"La femme de mon oncle est ma tante."

Translation:My uncle's wife is my aunt.

6 years ago

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Zebila

Auntie should be accepted?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thesilkworm

I agree - auntie and aunt are used more or less interchangeably in the UK, in my experience.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xakk
Plus
  • 25
  • 14
  • 10
  • 403

I have only heard, 'auntie' used as an endearing term, and I'm from the U.S. Generally, 'aunt.' is more widely accepted as the common term, whereas it seems to me, 'auntie' has the more personal connotation. The translation makes sense to me, as I've heard, 'tantine,' as a direct interpretation of the more endearing word.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brains-BeautyLOL

Just to add for cultural sake, here in Canada, the word "auntie" is typically reserved solely for the youngest family members or used as an endearing term/nickname. For example: Should an adult refer to or present their aunt as "This is auntie Tina", one might assume they were being immature intentionally or were, well.... let's say not wanting to appeal to the adults or the educated in the room. Once one becomes of age, they use "aunt" and only "aunt", typically. Whereas "auntIE" is the equivalent of using "momma" instead of "mom" or "mother". Or "daddy" rather than "dad", "father" and so forth.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laetitia_Lalila

No, because the sentence is not written in familiar language. If it were: "La femme de mon oncle est ma tantine.", only then your translation would be correct.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TomWatson2

In the UK, nobody would ever say Aunt.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbaldwin

Of course we do. Perhaps not as a title when addressing someone but you might certainly say "she is my aunt".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RebeccaHillary
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

No 'we' don't - not every Brit uses 'aunt'. Not a single person in my family has ever used it, and they'd be looked at funny if they did. Perhaps it's a North/South thing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gavier
Mod
  • 25
  • 14
  • 7
  • 4

Possibly regional but "aunt" is perfectly normal where I live (south of England). Auntie is just more familiar.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
Mod
  • 25
  • 1594

Be aware that while many UK English speakers use "auntie" or "aunty" in place of "aunt", this presumes a co-opting of "tante" = "aunt". The Oxford French Dictionary describes the familiar terms "aunty" and "auntie" as "child language" which corresponds to the French, la tantine/tatan/tatie/tata. Duolingo understands that large numbers of English-speakers use the more familiar term every day but also wants learners to know that there is a difference between the standard "tante" and the informal "tantine/tatan/tatie/tata".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

Right! The point is not that people don't use "auntie" or "aunty" regularly in English (even to the exclusion of "aunt"), but that, when they do do, they are using the equivalent of « tantine » not « tante ». Or to put it another way, if they see a French sentence with « tante », they should come to terms with the fact that it's French that doesn't correspond to their preferred way of speaking in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LovingLinguist

Lol I think people are overthinking it. "Auntie" isn't a nickname solely given by children, my Mum still calls her aunt "Auntie Margaret"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gavier
Mod
  • 25
  • 14
  • 7
  • 4

You're right of course, it's just that there are those here who are making sweeping statements implying that Aunt is NEVER said in UK English etc. It's not difficult - Aunt = Tante, Auntie = Tantine or Tatie. Use the one appropriate to the situation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirzaka
  • 21
  • 14
  • 9

why not - the woman of my uncle is my aunt?????

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/twiztedfate

USUALLY it means wife if it's a possessive before the noun, and woman if it's an article before the noun. But of course it's not always the case. Sometimes you just got to go off of context . You would never say "the woman of my uncle is my aunt" it's just not correct. so in this case because of context you need the put "the wife" it's still possessive in a way just not the way most people are used to the whole "Ma femme" or "Sa Femme".

"De mon oncle" makes it "of my uncle", which turns it into a possessive sentence. therefore it would be The wife not the woman.

Hope it helps

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

Precisely. What matters is that there is a possessive expressed (though not with a possessive adjective), which pushes the meaning to "wife."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
Mod
  • 25
  • 1594

Whenever you have a family reference, you interpret it as "wife", not "woman". More importantly, the syntax of "the wife of my uncle is my aunt" is not idiomatic (natural) in English at all. It is a common joke among English-speakers studying French to say "the wife of my uncle is my aunt" to mirror the French "La femme de mon oncle est ma tante", but English almost never uses that structure. We say "My uncle's wife is my aunt."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IRSYADIPA
  • 20
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 3

It's so easy for Indonesians since Tante is till Tante in Indonesian

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Norwegian123

Same in norwegian

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samashy14

Why is La femme= Wife instead of The woman??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

"la femme de X " means that she is married with X.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bkilinc

You all are learning French, not analyzing Uk or US English. It is tiring to read all that "but this is not like this in Uk, not like this in US" stuff while looking for something useful. You are so lucky to learn another language using your mother tongue. Be happy and study :)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankenstein724
  • 17
  • 14
  • 12
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2

I mean, but it’s relevant to know the different ways something can be translated back into the mother tongue.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaborBihary
  • 23
  • 21
  • 18
  • 16
  • 12
  • 8
  • 423

I heard "et" instead of "est". They sound the same and the text makes sense either way even if it is not a complete sentence with "et".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanCosta6
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

The uncle's wife is my aunt. Where is the mistake?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

Whose uncle?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanCosta6
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Okay, I understand it. Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/benncm

Auntie is more popular than Aunt in the UK. Posh people say Aunt and everyone else says Auntie.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gavier
Mod
  • 25
  • 14
  • 7
  • 4

It's really much more about the situation. I might call my aunt "Auntie" when addressing her but If I was speaking to other adults outside my family I would refer to her as my aunt. Auntie would seem childish to me in the latter situation. Maybe I am posh though? ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/benncm

I would find it strange to go from calling my auntie 'auntie' to 'aunt'. I think it would change the dynamic of our relationship. I like maintaining the same dynamic by sticking to the one usage for life.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gavier
Mod
  • 25
  • 14
  • 7
  • 4

Well of course, and why would you? :-)

The problem here though (as I see it) is that certain people (not pointing any fingers) seem to be confusing two different questions.

The first question, as posed by Duolingo is essentially "what English word equates to the French word 'Tante'?"

The answer to this is Aunt.

The second question is "How do you like to address your aunt?". The answer to this will vary but will probably be 'aunt' or 'auntie'

This is fine but the two questions are unrelated.

Aunt = Tante

Auntie = Tantine/Tatie/Tata

That's it. "Tante" does NOT equal "Auntie". No more than "mère" is equal to "mum" or "mummy".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

By "posh" do I have to assume you mean anyone speaking proper English?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alleigh25
  • 16
  • 13
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

No, one can speak proper English without being "posh." Posh means upper class (or trying to seem upper class), and posh speech is a particular combination of accent and vocabulary, in addition to generally correct grammar. It comes across as more formal and sometimes a bit affected.

As an American, we don't use the word much, and almost exclusively to describe the most blatantly posh of British people (common among older actors), but the closest thing we have here is the classic "Boston Brahmin" accent, which is nearly dead. Both convey that the speaker is from a wealthy family and was probably educated at an exclusive private (public, in the UK) or boarding school.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

That's exactly what I thought, hence my question to benncm, just in case I was unaware of a recent change of meaning. ;-)

Note that the French for "posh" is "snob".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gavier
Mod
  • 25
  • 14
  • 7
  • 4

It's interesting to note that 'snob' is both a noun and and adjective in french. "Mère est un peu snob!" = "Mother is a bit of a snob/is a bit snobbish"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Frank682031

Why not "my wife's uncle is my aunt"? It does sound weird in english, but how else would we know the difference without reading enlish contex

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gavier
Mod
  • 25
  • 14
  • 7
  • 4

That would be "l'oncle de ma femme" not "la femme de mon oncle".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

And "l'oncle de ma femme" is a man.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicLiam
  • 20
  • 19
  • 18
  • 11
  • 183

Because you have two genders for the same person - they are your wife's uncle but your aunt.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluthulhu

NO!?!?!? REALLY!?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

Your aunt could also be your mother's sister, though!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bettyfarmer

uncle's means uncle is, therefore uncles wife is correct not uncle's wife. incorrect use of apostrophie

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gavier
Mod
  • 25
  • 14
  • 7
  • 4

"Uncle's" can mean "uncle is" OR it can mean "belonging to uncle". This is the correct way to form the possessive in English. However, "uncles wife" with no apostrophe does not mean anything.

http://www.edufind.com/english-grammar/forming-possessive/

2 years ago
Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.