"Beviamo acqua."

Translation:We drink water.

March 14, 2013

80 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pinkdejmon

beviamo acqua or beviamo l'acqua? and why? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NQM

both are correct, it's the same as "we drink water or we drink the water".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mauarus

he considered wrong when I answered "Beviamo l'acqua" EDIT: I guess "Biaviamo l'acqua" would mean "we drink THE water", while he asked for "we drink water", isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth360901

They marked it wrong the last time when I put acqua. They need some explanation. Very annoying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/redcamelia

Yup you figured it out right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spookiyu

In English, I would only say "We drink the water" if there was some specific water source in question. (e.g. "There is a glass of water on the table. What do you do?")

Is that the same in Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

Not quite. It's rather like in French: you prefix it with a definite article ("the") when you're talking about the abstract, the entirety or generality of something. E.g. to say "Cats are ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤" (as in all cats in general), you say "I gatti sono stronzi".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ishana92

but duo accepts both the water and water for l'acqua. Also, the water sounds weird to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

It does sound strange in English, because English doesn't prefix general/abstract concepts with "the". But even in English you can say "I drink the water", e.g. as a reply to a question like: "There is a glass of water on the table. What do you do?", because now "the" refers to that particular water.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ingrid749750

Ive been taught that "I drink the water" is equivalent to that I, as a person, drink water. Same as I would say "Mangio il formaggio" if I came over to your house, and you wondered if I could have cheese. Ommiting the definite article gives a different emphasize. If I meet you at a bar, and you already had ordered a beverage, I could ask you "Cosa bevi?" And you would answer me: "Bevo aqua".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aussie97

I love "beviamo" not for what it means, but it just sounds good! lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aussie97

I guess it just sounds very "Italiano"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maiconerd

Like "Andiamo", right ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DukeRood

Can this also mean, "Let's drink water!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney

I believe you can.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonN748207

It accepts it. Duolingo also accepted "Drink the water" (imperative in english) for "Bevete l'acqua"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nada49

What I am finding is that listening to the fine points is very important. She does not say " l'acqua" only "acqua". Important difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

This approach might fail you for some courses here: when there are audio glitches and moments of silence in the sound samples. I had this problem in the Indonesian course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kilosam

Where is the "we" here ? Why is my answer of drink water wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fernandoarg

In Italian is not necessary to write the subject pronouns because the verb has a particular form with each one (that fact does not happen in English). For example the verb ''parlare'' (to speak). Its conjugation in the present simple tense is as follows: Io parlo (I speak), Tu parli (you speak), Lui / Lei parla (he / she speaks), Noi parliamo (we speak), Voi parlate (you all speak), Loro parlano (they speak). As you can see if I write ''Parlo con la mia mamma'' (I speak with my mom), it involves the Italian subject pronoun ''io'' but I can omit it because the form ''parlo'' is just for that person. I am a native Spanish speaker and my language follows the same rule.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alayna570322

That is a great explanation and makes a lot of sense. Im wondering why, though, sometimes it asks for a pronoun and sometimes it doesnt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rose903891

Very helpful answer. However I didn't think you'd use la in your example of "la mia mamma" - can any native speakers confirm? Have seen in other exercises that family members don't need the article. Thx


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

I'm not a native speaker but for what it's worth I've heard the same: that in Italian you put the definite article before the possessive-adjective-followed-by-a-noun, eg "la mia casa" ("my house") but not when referring to family members, so I think it should be "mia mamma".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patricia554812

Wow... Excellent explanation. That time also apply to Spanish, I guess it's because Italian and Spanish share the same origen... Latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntonellaP654393

And so does French and Portuguese i can understand some because Italian French and Portuguese are sort of like spanish so yeaaah hope it also gave u a tip if u are planning on learning Spanish :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

True, Latin didn't make much use of subject pronouns as the inflexions on the verb made them unnecessary, and Italian and Spanish have followed their parent language. Strange that French should be so different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

Yeah, except in French they also have different conjugated forms of the verb for different persons, so the information about the person is also contained in the verb form, and yet they still require those personal pronouns :q (and all of that despite being lazy in other areas of the language, e.g. dropping so much in speech at the end of words unless they are forced to pronounce it). So this really explains nothing about why some languages allow to drop personal pronouns while others don't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InvisibleOwl

Why can't I say "we all drink water" instead of "We drink water"? is there a difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney

"We all" and "We" are not the same.

For example, you and your buddy are in a group of ten people. Only you and your buddy are drinking water; everyone else is drinking beer. The waiter comes to your table and says, "More beer?" You would reply, "We're drinking water," (indicating you and your buddy). You would not say, "We are all drinking water," because the other eight people are not drinking water.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

But this is a shortcoming of the English language in which there's no clear distinction between singular "you" and plural "you". Well, unless you're a Southerner, then you just say "y'all" for the plural, problem solved ;) But yeah, DuoLingo better accept the "you all" for those who want to emphasize that they meant the plural form, it's better for learning. (And we're not here to learn English, are we? We're here to learn Italian :q )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thoughtdiva

I think that would be "beviamo l'acqua tutti noi" or similar - there is a difference just as there is in English -emphasising the "all".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mdsolis1

How would you say, let's drink water


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thoughtdiva

"Let's drink" is also "beviamo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bill2254

Don't all Italian nouns require an article


[deactivated user]

    I answered "We buy water" and it wasn't correct, although it says drink / buy in the description of the meaning when you tap on the word.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thoughtdiva

    You can't rely on the hints - they are often wrong and can't account for all contexts anyway. You can report this - beviamo never means "we buy" (unless it is part of some obscure idiom I don't know about).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielDayot

    This or with "Noi" before "beviamo"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntonellaP654393

    I typed in accidentally 'beviamo acquaa" and it did not count as a typo why?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

    Because DuoLingo doesn't have a brain :q


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wendymonet

    Why isn‘t it “Noi beviamo acqua“? Why did they leave out “we“ at the beginning?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/redcamelia

    because that's what the different verb terminations are for. So the "-iamo" implies that the verb is being used for the first person at plural aka "noi"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bgscharnhorst

    By saying "beviamo acqua," the assumption is "noi"...why not "they," as in "loro beviamo acqua?" This is what I thought the answer was.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janneine

    They conjugates to ono as in Bevono acqua... not iamo.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Botlin

    Would be good if the english sentences are given more often and the user has to spell the words letter by letter .


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErinAldrich

    Is there a way to remember that "beviamo" is for "we drink"? I always mix up the pronouns with these words.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

    Well, there is, if you're Polish, because in Polish, verbs in first person plural have an ending "-my" which is similar to the Italian "-mo". And this should work quite similar way in other Romance languages (based on Latin) – they often have that "m" sound in first person forms. But for English, I don't have any idea. Hmm… Perhaps you could connect that "m" sound with "Me and My friend" or something?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poppy108041

    I got it right and it said ibgot it wrong it then showed the answer and it said exactly what i put.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alan388134

    Me too. How did you get past that point or didn't you?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alan388134

    I typed "We drink water" but it repatedly tells me I got it wrong, it should be "We drink water". ???????


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bill2254

    don't all nouns require an article


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagieChris

    that's water I wrote and it was incorrect ????


    [deactivated user]

      the answer given was 'let us drink water' how come???


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharon989189

      Thats what i said y just spelled it wrong


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Silvia569487

      There seems to be a problem with the audios, the last part of the sentence is not always clear


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kieran350679

      I had reached Abs. Ob1 at level 4. Something happened and I lost all the work that I had done. Now I have to start back at basic level 1 again. Please explain why this happened. Kieran.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mickeyx11

      "Acqua" is not clear in this sentence


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

      Use a water filter :)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShanaThurs

      Why would it be "beviamo acqua" instead of "noi beviamo acqua"? Or is it considered the same thing in either case and used the same way?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

      You can omit subject pronouns in Italian unless there would be ambiguity (eg "beve" might need "lui" or "lei" before it), or you may need the subject pronoun for emphasis.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kobe459015

      Y'all really put "Waiter" next to water


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/haskjdfsask

      Why are articles mandatory in Italian, except for this sentence?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike384572

      I'm confused. When do we use "the," such as acqua vs. l'acqua. Maybe more better, when do we not use "the."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vrednaya_zhopka

      я вообще блин из России


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dancass3

      how would you say "drinking water"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thoughtdiva

      Do you mean drinking as an adjective (ie "water for drinking"?) - if so, I think it might be "l'acqua da bere" or something like that. If you mean the gerund (eg "we are drinking water"), this can be the same phrase in Italian "Beviamo l'acqua". However, for an action CURRENTLY IN PROGRESS, the Italians would use the present continuous: "Stiamo bevendo l'acqua" = "we are drinking water" (at this moment).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

      "We are drinking water" is not a gerund. In this sentence, "are drinking" is a verb phrase in which "drinking" is present (continuous) participle. Gerunds are nouns, e.g. as in your previous sentence: "Water for drinking" (for what?), or as in "Drinking is my favourite part of life".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobC5

      How do you say 'I drink water'? Wasnt it also 'beviamo'?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DukeRood

      Nope. I drink water is, "Io bevo acqua" or "bevo acqua."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NORH788959

      I said : we all drink water ....


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nonna602151

      Does anuone else hear "bewiamo" when he speaks? Is that dialectical?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AsmitaJadh7

      In which I am going to get these books


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshHoldin

      Right i said we all drink water an lost a life. Thats what i call an inside job


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/almarios969326

      Hi tkanks for helping


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NevaehStaf1

      I tapped italian and it came Maltese


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilviaCina3

      If I want to leave during a lesson it will not save my progress so I have to stay the whole lesson ,but then I froget it and do another lesson and then in the middle of it I remember and the cycle goes on !


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilviaCina3

      Yeah so I almost give up,even though I I want to learn Italiano


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/julia662507

      The microphone doesnt work for me

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