"Ñuho jaeho azantys sȳz issa."

Translation:My god's knight is good.

10/23/2017, 5:51:14 PM

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LastStarkgaryen
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Can jaes ever be interpreted as lord, in the religious sense? Or is it strictly "god?"

10/23/2017, 5:51:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/StephieRice
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Yes, if you use "lord" as a synonym of "god" then they are synonymous.

6/7/2018, 5:13:41 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/FarLander471

I'm pretty sure not. In this language, "god," or "deity" translates to jaes.
Master and lord both have the same meaning. You could call a king "a lord of a country," so, I think not.

5/31/2018, 12:56:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/StephieRice
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Deciding what to translate is based on meaning, here when they said "lord in a religious sense" then we know they are specifically excluding a political lord.

It's kinda like them asking if they can translate something as "bat", specifically pointing out that they mean the winged animal and you told them no because "bat" can mean a piece of wood or metal formed into a specific shape and used to hit a ball in sports.

6/7/2018, 5:17:02 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/BrunoSenra

Fully agree with Stephie but also just would like to point out that while "(the) Lord" in a religious sense is tied to RL religions, in Westeros (or the other places we know from the Lands of Ice and Fire), one would likely say "The Lord of the Light", "Lord Rh'llor", or some other title depending on which entity we're referring to. It's similar to why just "God" isn't accepted in most exercises (it's not really used by Westerosi/Essosi/etc. people that way, as far as we know).

7/9/2018, 9:08:28 AM
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