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  5. "학생은 한국 사람입니다."

"학생은 한국 사람입니다."

Translation:The student is a Korean person.

October 25, 2017

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katie483232

I wrote the student is korean and it wasnt accepted. I understand that person was written however it was a correct translation of the phrase. So should is not count


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbbyCanaco

same thoughts though....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ale4292000

It really should count...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xMira_

I wrote "Korean student." I'm confused...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngeCI
  • 1511

It would be “한국 학생”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fbr_brazil

The recommended translation is not idiomatic English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Murakel

It sounds clunky when you say it out loud, but written out it feels to me more like legalese. The phrase "Korean person" could be used in a legal document to specify an individual of Korean nationality. Not natural spoken English, but grammatically correct if overly specific.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erik_Sadul

I think this is a common way of saying someone's nationality (i.e. The student is Korean). The 사람 part isn't necessarily translated directly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tasha37857

Is there any way to tell what word Korea modifies? Based on the other sentences I wrote "The Korean student is a person" but I got it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/L33shy_moo

The adjective comes [before] the noun, don't worry lmao, I said the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rocky119191

I think if you wanted to say the korean student is a person, you would need to connect the topic with the subject by using a particle or put korea in front of student. In this sentence, there is no particle therefor we can attach the noun to the following verb? this is is a guess of course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatheusPr2106

So, 학생은 한국입니다 could be translated to "The student is korean" or that's why the 사람 is there ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarlaBangtan

I wrote 'The student is from Korea.' Is it grammatically incorrect or is it Duolingo's error?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Murakel

The literal translation is "The student is a Korea-person"; while your translation conveys the same meaning it's not precisely the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BangtansKo

Thats wrong bcs 한국 사람 [hangug salam/saram] means a Koean person


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fraser436222

"He is Korean" exactly means "he is a Korean person."

Except "he is a Korean person" is very strange in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan547271

I just completed this with an answer of "korean student" to be met with an incorrect answer....... what. the. ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna181296

I wrote the student is korean but it said the student is a Korean person so if thats the case then is doulingo being super formal or something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Levi2512

I thought the translation was "the Korean student is a person" and confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Druckles

So I'm trying to understand this construction. Working from what I know (학생은 사람입니다 = the student is a person), does 한국 (Korea) modify 사람 (person) here? Does this break down to:

[student] [korean person][is]?

Can I do something similar like:

학생 영국 사람입니다?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wintertriangles

Yes you can do that (but in writing it looks weird without particles, even if in speaking it is possible!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dipti977415

I worte "The student is a korean person"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_jorussx

I wrote “The student is a Korean citizen” and got it wrong. What a dumb dumb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GohJiaHui1

"The student is a person from Korea." Is also correct right? :'D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diego542348

I wrote korean student


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvilTwinEllie

I forgot "person" at the end. Im never gonna get this lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaAr256390

I wrote "The student is Korean" and it isn't accepted. Isn't it just the same? "Korean" means "a citizen of Korea," so why would it need to add "person" in the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TolaKhoun

What is wrong here? Korean and Korean person. I wrote the student is Korea.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chaeyoung405516

hehe what the heal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngeCI
  • 1511

Should “the student is (a) Korean” be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arniel422096

It confuse me so much


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.DRCLkd

This is very confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LesChristiansen

What is a Korean person?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benseac

A person who is Korean.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BangtansKo

Someone who is from Korea


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LesChristiansen

Redudant or possibly racist definition.

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