1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Japanese
  4. >
  5. "The sky will be clear tomorr…

"The sky will be clear tomorrow."

Translation:明日は空が晴れます。

October 25, 2017

50 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattNewell99

shouldn't it be あしたはそらがはれです ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BunteBlumen

in this case "はれ" is part of the verb はれる (dictionary form) / はれます (polite form), meaning "to clear up"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andi_kan

Thanks. Although I understand the explanation, I just wonder how long it will stick in my memory =S


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YanagiPablo

Well, はれ as a noun is also derived from the verb...

The question is why sometimes it is a verbal form and other times a nominal one...

I am not fluent in Japanese, but I wonder if it isn't similar of how it works in Spanish. In Spanish you have "despejar" and "despejado" that work like 晴れる and 晴れ (well actually "despejado" Is an adjective, but that isn't the point).

When talking about the current state of the sky we say "el cielo está despejado", which is quite word for word 空が晴れです. And when talking about an evolving process (instead of the final result) we use the verb "mañana el cielo se despejará" which is word for word 明日、空が晴れる.

So, is this some similarity in this, or did I saw false parallelisms?

(TyrantRcさんもスペイン語が出来るから、その意見はおもしろいでしょう)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronCappra

but isnt the answer he suggested correct too? meaning the way the sky will be instead of the action it will perform?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Person373018

In that case, I would imagine the proper english trnaslation would be "the sky will clear (up) tomorrow".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James151779

I understand that the translation matches the English. However, it seems in previous versions the time has simply been a standalone at the front of the sentence. So would あしたそらははれます。be correct? And if so, how do we tell which Duo wants? [Duo counted the above as incorrect.]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam681255

Someone correct me if I'm wrong but I feel like 明日の空は晴れます is more correct .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Confefe

I guess that would mean tomorrow's sky rather than the sky tomorrow


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SerenellaC7

i also thought the japanese would say something like 明日の空 even if it makes little sense in english, following the same patter of 明日の天気


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephenARobson

は = as for tomorrow, the sky will be clear の = as for tomorrow's sky, it will be clear

Pretty similar.


[deactivated user]

    私は日本人です。「空が晴れる」なんて言い方はしません。空が晴れイコール「天気がいい」です。


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian401692

    My Japanese wife commented that this phrase is a bit stupid - not normal Japanese to even say "sora" ... simply ashita wa haremasu...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nopinopa

    I wonder, why ます?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UnapologeticNerd

    I had to look this up to verify, but 晴れる(hareru) is an actual verb "to be sunny/clear." It's a class 2 where ru->masu so it is correct. However I've never heard it used this way. In my experience I've also not heard people refer to JUST the sky, usually just the weather in general.

    Example: 明日の天気ははれだと思います。Or 明日の天気ははれでしょう。


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardF.5

    Maybe pilots look to the sky .


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gerrostey

    「あしたそらがはれます」 was marked wrong on 2/2/2019. Do we really need the particle は after あした?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gerrostey

    Still marked wrong without the は on 2019/02/14.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChadProper

    My understanding is if you forgo the は then you put a comma. Could be wrong but that's what I've noticed.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kazu136745

    こんな日本語は普通使わない。「明日は晴れます」が普通


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tamakko.chan

    空が晴れ渡るでしょう。 みたいな使い方をしますよね。


    [deactivated user]

      明日は空が晴れます。


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

      I kept getting this marked wrong thinking it was because I'd used kanji rather than hiragana, but in fact it was because I was using はれです rather than はれます。 Why would はれです be ok when speaking of a day, but wrong when speaking of the sky?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Animiles

      I entered 明日は空が晴れています. I'm pretty sure that this means something, but what exactly?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jolle760724

      Wouldn't "the sky will clear up tomorrow" be a more accurate English translation? Not a native English speaker, but I feel like it sounds more natural in English too.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

      Sounds reasonable to me, did you try it?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sihaz

      Why does it have to be ga rather than wa?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teamme5

      Here we're talking about the weather tomorrow. hence, bringing a new topic to talk about.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SweetGoblin

      Isn't that sunny?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liam315

      Not quite. Duolingo is translates it as sunny because it's the adjective we would more commonly use in English, but "clear weather" is a more accurate translation for 晴れ(はれ). Therefore if this is the polite form of the verb 晴れる(はれる)the translation "to clear up" makes sense.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angel_campoverde

      Either all has to be in Kanji, or all in Hiragana, it does not accept:

      明日はそれが晴れます


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mysti783250

      Bit late, but... you wrote 'それ' instead of 'そら' there. Dunno if that was the issue when you put the answer or just a typo here.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stu998188

      I think a better starting sentence in this case would be, "The sky will clear tomorrow." Using the verb form 晴れる, I think, is for a change of condition in the sky.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epiram

      明日の空は晴れです


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanniVV

      Where the hell did the ます come from


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaClara168182

      Guys, I don't get it.... Apparently 明日 can be read either as Asu or Ashita. Is there a difference? I've always heard Ashita, but is Asu more used? More formal?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattShnoop

      Yes, あす is more formal.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Solo_Leveling

      we all strive to build on a foundation that not only allows us to understand what is said to us in Japanese, but to respond in a way to forbid misunderstanding. words have meaning, context has consequences, and Mario...don't give up... even if your princess is in another castle. ^,.,^


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Set171183

      When is it ok to put the honorific お before 空 and when is it not ?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.qW7NdO

      Why we have ga after sky ?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomy466697

      普通は、「空が晴れます」とはいいません。「晴れます」で十分です。


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SLY.Fet

      Very strange to see this used as a verb after several 曇り exercises...


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkWilliams123

      What is wrong with 明日は空が晴れています? Is it that the ています ending indicates a continuing state, so more like "tomorrow the sky is being clear"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChadProper

      I don't know how accurate this is but: 明日は空が晴れます -> The sky will be clear tomorrow. 明日は空が晴れています -> The sky is clear tomorrow.

      It's almost like adding the -てい makes it strictly present tense which doesn't work since we're talking about the future (tomorrow).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jorgedro

      I entered 明日が空は晴れます. Can someone tell me why is that? Couldn't that be either way based on context?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jorgedro

      Why is that wrong*


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

      は marks the overall topic of the conversation. This is contextual information already known to the speaker. This stresses what comes after it as new information so it is most natural to place it at the beginning of your sentence.
      が marks new important information and the do-er or be-er of an action.
      The temporal noun 明日 is not the subject doing the action, just the contextual time for when the action happens so は makes the most sense.
      空 then is the subject が that is doing the action/state of "will be clear"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

      That would mean "as for the sky, tomorrow is clear".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BMGX4H

      Ohhh so 晴れ can be both a noun and a verb

      Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.