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  5. "I'm sorry. It's okay."

"I'm sorry. It's okay."

Translation:죄송합니다. 괜찮습니다.

October 26, 2017

53 Comments


[deactivated user]

    What is the difference between "Mianhae" and "Mianhabnida"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bryan603784

    Politeness level. 미안해 Doesn't have a politeness particle like 요 on the end, so i think it would be considered Banmal (casual language). 미안합니다 Is Jondenmal (formal language).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liv4life1

    I belive Mianhabnida is more formal than mianhae.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Loki_Dedu

    미안해요 also means sorry


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alphasofiaa

    Yes. I tried to answer this out of curiosity if Duolingo will accept it but I was wrong


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sanjana0901

    why is mianhae wrong for saying i'm sorry?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slycordinator

    It's not, but duolingo doesn't use informal styles. It won't accept 미안해, but it probably accepts 미안해요, which is more polite.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eeegold

    It doesn't accept anything but high formal, unfortunately :-/


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scottman18

    It does not accept 미안해요. It is looking for matching articles, so if the second ends with -ㅂ니다, the first must also. eg. 미안해요. 괜찬습니다. Is incorrect. 미안합니다. 괜찬습니다. Should be accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nefertarip

    미안해 is also sorry, i guest


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oubliette_

    Can '괜찮습니다' also be translated as "I'm okay"? I don't see how these phrases denote a difference between I/it


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ceratius

    Yes, it can, depending on context. But it's more used after someone, for example, bumped into you and says sorry (similar to this sentence here). But 괜찮아요 is a very versatile expression.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xNOMx

    Actually, 괜차나 is "I'm okay"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ceratius

    First of all, it's 괜찮아[요]. Second of all, it's not always "I". Korean is a context-dependant language. It can mean everything from "I am okay" aaaall the way down to "They're okay". It just depends on the context of the situation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/veneerworl

    Why "choesunghabnida" is the right answer and not "mianhaeyo" ??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slycordinator

    It might be if you mixed formality levels of the two sentences.

    As far as I know, by now it accepts: "미안합니다. 괜찮습니다." "미안해요. 괜찮아요."

    But I believe it doesn't accept: "미안해요. 괜찮습니다."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HuntingHawk1415

    Although that's technically correct because you're using the correct words, you're mixing both levels of formality, so your grammar is incorrect.

    미안해 is the "declarative present informal low" form of the informal word for sorry

    죄송합니다 is the "declarative present formal high" form of the formal word for sorry


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RayCoward

    Adding the 요 at the end makes it formal does it not?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lackbittern

    No, it makes it polite, but not formal.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Priam905041

    Yes, but this exchange would be two people talking. So if there's a status difference between the speakers, there would be two different levels of formality


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabiola_Mac

    No, it's not an exchange, it's the same person saying both things.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam255707

    Seems like spliting hairs to me as I would never hear a Korean correct me on this. Point taken.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sere1na

    same happened w/ me. i was so confused!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ceratius

    죄송아요. 괜찮아요. should be accepted, right?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slycordinator

    죄송아요 is not correct.

    It's "죄송합니다" or "죄송해요".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomyIsAFrie

    I don't know but I'm pretty sure on this speech level we have to use formal ending "습니다" with "스" dropping after a vowel and that's why it could've considered your answer wrong


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Treal19

    It's confusing and a little frustrating that 괜찮아요 is not accepted. Is there a way for questions to ask for specific formalities (ex. -습니다, -요) when users are using the keyboard function? Or can questions be changed to include both polite and formal writings as correct answers?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slycordinator

    By the way, it's accepted now. If you find something that's correct that they mark as incorrect, you can click on the "report" button and tell them that your answer should've been accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WeiWei68441

    How do you difference 입니다 and 습니다?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Taeyeong10

    Miamhaeyo is the same thing??????


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ICYCLESTICK

    what's the difference between: -습니다 and -합니다


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zaheema099

    Gwaen-chanh-seub-ni-da,why does the second syllable have more than three alphabets (ch,a,n and h)?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slycordinator

    There are many words in which the bottom has two consonants. That's simply the way those words are spelled


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomIves3

    미안함니다 means sorry aswell!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slycordinator

    The confusion you might've had is that when the batchim (bottom of a syllable block) is ㅂ and the next letter begins with ㄴ, people pronounce it with the sound of ㅁ.

    미안합니다 can sound like 미안함니다.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KairiFroehlich

    It would be "미안합니다" You just spelled it wrong is all.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ghala12320

    why does there have to be "ㅎ" after the "ㄴ"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KairiFroehlich

    It's dictionary form is "괜찮아다" meaning that this verb will always have a "ㅎ" after "ㄴ" If you are asking why it was formed that way when Hangul was made. My best guess is that the verb's pronunciation at the time was more breathy in-between the "ㄴ" and "ㅏ" than it would be pronounced if you left the "ㅎ" out. Either way, its the way its spelled so you CAN leave it out...it would just be spelled wrong :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ceratius

    Small correction: dictionary form is 괜찮다, without 아. 아 is added in normal conjugation, but not in polite conjugation:

    괜찮아

    괜찮아요

    괜찮습니다 << No 아


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Min_Blessing

    Is there a difference is 괜찮습니다 and 괜찮하요 (if I've spelt out correctly) out of it just formality?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slycordinator

    The difference is formality levels; there are many different levels of it in Korean hierarchy...

    Although, it's "괜찮아요".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CrimsonFig

    The nature of the app for the language is formal sayings. Hence the more polite and extended versions of phrases some already heard


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anamallory

    Why "it's okay" is so hard to write


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesAle9

    This one is too ambiguous to be difinitive.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lunarflyby

    What's the difference between 죄송하다 and 미안하다?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slycordinator

    죄송하다 implies more respect. Ex: 미안해 is the informal conjugation and is used often with friends. 죄송해 makes no sense (even if it's correct conjugation), because it mixes showing respect together with extreme informality.

    Literally 죄송하다 is "罪悚"하다. 罪 means crime/sin and 悚 means regret.

    And 미안하다 is "未安"하다. 未 apparently means "not yet" and 安 means peaceful/tranquil/quiet


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/veneerworl

    That's pretty awesome fact.!! Kamsabnida


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itsnimm

    Polite form is JE-SONG-HIMNIDA


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slycordinator

    That's formal, although it's "habnida" or "hamnida".

    Simply being polite could be "죄송해요" (je/jwe-song-hae-yo).

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