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https://www.duolingo.com/nathanbash

What is the difference between Castellano and Español?

Does the definition of Castellano vary from country to country.

4 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/quefaselbotch

castellano is the Spanish national landguage (official) is from castilla there are two castillas, castilla la nueva and castilla la vieja, la nueva is Madrid Toledo ciudad real Cuenca and Guadalajara, and la vieja, is leon Zamora Salamanca Valladolid and Palencia all this regions speak the castillian language, and the rest of spain apart from Catalunya, Galicia and las Vascongadas, wich are different languages, the rest of the contry speak Spanish with some accents ,of there own reagion , so castellano and espanol is no much different, but at the end they are all as espanol

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nathanbash

Thank you! Is castellano spoken in south america and central america?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skutir

It used to be the official language of the Philippines, not sure how much it is used now or how much it overlaps with Filipino. I don't think there's a practical difference between Castellano and Spanish; there are other languages in Spain but when people say "Spanish" they mean Castellano. I don't think outside of Spain anybody calls it Castellano.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tmarvin
tmarvin
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Castellano is the more common term in South America, actually: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Castellano-Espa%C3%B1ol-en.png

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skutir

Oh! I give you a lingot since I was wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OnesimusUnbound

I'm a Filipino and I can confirm that Spanish loanwords fill every dialects in the Philippines.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quefaselbotch

yes in central America and south America they will speck Spanish (castellano) but all the different country's like Cuba, Mejico, Colombia, Chile, and so on, they all have their own, variations ,different accents ,and some times, different meanings compare to the Spanish language from the castellano (spain), Don't know why, perhaps every country they like to put their own stamp.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Aranese, co-official in Catalonia.[7] It is spoken mainly in the Pyrenean comarca of the Aran Valley (Val d'Aran), in north-western Catalonia. It is a variety of Gascon, which in turn is a variety of the Occitan language. Basque, co-official in the Basque Country and northern Navarre (see Basque and mixed zones). Basque is the only non-Romance language with an official status in mainland Spain. Catalan, co-official in Catalonia, the Balearic Islands and, as a distinct variant (Valencian), in the Valencian Community. It is recognised—but not official—in Aragon (La Franja). Furthermore, it is also spoken without official recognition in the municipality of Carche, Murcia. Galician, co-official in Galicia. It is also spoken without official recognition in the adjacent western parts of the Principality of Asturias and Castile and León. Spanish is official throughout the country; the rest of these languages have co-official status in their respective communities, and (except Aranese) are widespread enough to have daily newspapers and significant book publishing and media presence in those communities. In the cases of Catalan and Galician, they are the main languages used by the Catalan and Galician regional governments and local administrations. A number of citizens in these areas consider their regional language as their primary language and Spanish as secondary.

The vernacular languages of Spain (simplified) Spanish official; spoken all over the country Catalan/Valencian, co-official Basque, co-official Galician, co-official Aranese, co-official (dialect of Occitan) Asturian and Leonese, recognised Aragonese, recognised Extremaduran, unofficial Fala, unofficial In addition to these, there are a number of seriously endangered and recognised minority languages:

Aragonese, recognised—but not official—in Aragon. Asturian, recognised—but not official—in Asturias. Leonese, recognised—but not official—in Castile and León. Spoken in the provinces of León and Zamora.

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Spain

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejoPF
AlejoPF
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As far as I know in the RAE prefers español instead castellano. But in Spain: Catalan, Basque, Galician and other languages are spoken, and these are Spanish languages (i.e languages from Spain) as well. So, the people who speak these other languages prefer castellano instead español.

In movies' dubbing, castellano dubbing is for Spain, while latino dubbing in for latin america.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quefaselbotch

This a political matter, and castellano is the national speaking language in Spain, the other languages are not Spanish languages ,are languages from Spain, if you look the Spanish history they were the fenicios then the ibericos fighting, now we still fighting for our independence the vascos want their independence they try to separate from the rest of Spain because they have their own culture, they have organisations like ETA equally to the Irish IRA they don't want to be part of Spain neither are the Catalans we have got different cultures, bur having say that they are languages from Spain not Spanish languages

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejoPF
AlejoPF
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I know it has a strong political connotation, I had not realized the difference between "Spanish languages" and "languages from Spain", you're right separating those meanings. I think those meanings are used by two sides as an argument of their thinking (spanish languages vs. languages from spain). Am I right?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quefaselbotch

you are absolutely right, it is not just the language, the culture goes with it as well, just because you hold a Spanish passport, this doesn't mean you dance flamenco or you love bullfighting as a Spanish image give to the that culture, there are fifty two region's and they all different in a way, in the outside world we are all Spaniards, but that's only in the outside world, the same as United Kingdom ,there are Irish, Scottish, wells and English , they are all British, in the outside ,but they are very different in the inside.

4 years ago