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  5. "만나서 반갑습니다, 고맙습니다!"

"만나서 반갑습니다, 고맙습니다!"

Translation:Nice to meet you, thank you!

October 30, 2017

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tommy97263

I feel that it's more natural in English to say, "Thank you, nice to meet you!" The orders of the words should not really matter in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joshua7373

I agree. Nice to meet you, thanks is rather odd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XxSiennaCxX

They have. Different word order


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xNOMx

It's a dialogue of two people


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0hrstoepsel

Yeah you should report it:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XxSiennaCxX

There word order is different


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrantPeppe

Is 고맙습니다 more formal or informal? Under what circumstances would you use it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talon192

There is a longer answer, but in short: yes. Anything with "습니다" is formal.

However, 고맙습니다 (pure Korean) is currently slightly less formal than 감사합니다 (Chinese-derived). Lots of Korean is derived from Chinese characters called 한자 in Korean (similar to Kanji in Japanese).

With recent generations, 고맙다 is replacing 감사하다 because Koreans want to speak pure Korean. Given enough time, I expect 고맙습니다 to be the standard.

Don't address great-grandma with 고맙습니다, but for the most part if you speak to someone younger than 50 years old-- they will appreciate it and instantly know you understand the modern culture.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dauid2

This is a very insightful comment. 고맙습니다.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/er284298

Lol are you copy and pasting this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anto8478

고맙습니다 is formal. Every verb with ㅂ니다 at the end is formal. Yoi can use 고맙습니다 with people who you don't know. 감사합니다 Is other form to say thank you but this one is more formal than 고맙습니다. I hope you can understand, I don't speak english but I'm trying:'v


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/birenglass

Yes its more formal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XxSiennaCxX

It is more formal, it’s pronounced,”gamsahamida”. The informal ver. Is ,”gomawo”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

meet(만나)+and so(서) to be glad(반갑)+nida(습니다), to be thankful(고맙)+nida(습니다) ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reveluvluvluv

mannaseo bangabseubnida, gomabseubnida


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XxSiennaCxX

It’s ‘bangawhyo, gamsahamida’ the speaker is wrong. Trust me I use 5 different sources and everyone but this one says it’s well.... that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SammieMoek

In alot of languages English sentences are reversed. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talon192

I typed "I'm pleased to meet you" which should also be an acceptable answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SunBern

Not a rhetorical question: In what situation would someone say "Thank you, nice to meet you!"? Or for that matter "Nice to meet you, thank you!"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XxSiennaCxX

They have a different word order


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xNOMx

It's two people talking, to help show dialogue


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bMEK3

고맙습니다,감사합니다 ->Thank you 고마워 -> Thanks 대단히 감사합니다 ->Thank you very much


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GABRIELHAL729020

It makes more sense to say "Nice to meet you and thank you for what you have done" but that is way more complex.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/surbhi32083

This language is really very difficult to speak.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yasmn.bkh

Are korean people speak fast this much? Im feel nervous now


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MOARMY12

Is there any way to slow down the speaker? I don't know how to say it because it is going too fast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tania260852

I'm confused! In Korean do you say both words for nice to meet you all the time in a sentence, or do you have to say both words (만나서 and 반갑습니다) or have I completely lost the plot?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Physis_

I just found this comment in a forum about the korean language, i think is made by a native. It goes like this : ''만나다 = meet 반갑다 = be glad/nice Therefore, 만나서 반갑습니다 = Nice/glad to meet you.

You can say both of them when you first meet someone, the someone will know it implies '만나서' even if you say only 반갑습니다. But if I say any of those to my friend, the friend will think I must be crazy.''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/converse0person

I thought 감사합니다 or 고마워요 was thank you. And why do you need to say nice to meet you twice in the same sentence?? I’m so confused rn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryGlover

고맙습니다 is thank you and just a bit less formal than 감사합니다. 고마워요 is informal but still polite, you say this one to friends. And you are not saying nice to meet you twice, 만나서 is meet, 반갑습니다 is being glad, so together they form nice to meet you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clarissa_Rosex

Thank you that was confusing me too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaehoon700428

문법 너무 안맞음


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RubenEmblem

where's gamsahabnida?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Javvszx

Anyone who wants to be my study buddy?☺


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuanpeNarro

I wrote Nice to meet you, thanks you and it was not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/birenglass

This is reversed?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XxSiennaCxX

Different word order


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VanessaBod2

If you've only just met them, wouldn't it make more sense to say kamsahamnida (more polite)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aman954825

I did it right but it say wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XxSiennaCxX

The first word is attually pronounced, ‘bangawhyoh’. The speaker, in this case, really isn’t right. I’ve checked on many pages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryGlover

No, that would be incorrect. What you wrote is an entirely different form of the word, which would be written as 반가워요, which is not what is being shown in the lesson, the lesson has 반갑습니다, pronounced ban gap seub ni da

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