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  5. "Ti voglio."

"Ti voglio."

Translation:I want you.

March 14, 2013

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daviddpianist

Oh baby. ;) Duolingo turning up the heat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Odium1002

I just came here to see if someone commented on that. Thank you for making me laugh and writing it in the first post :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jacob_sangi

I need some water. Voglio suo acqua duo!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jae633849

Sono lusingata, Duo, ma non voglio farlo con un gufetto.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HavardF

After consulting an Italian friend, I've figured out that "Ti voglio" means "I want you" in a kind of sexual way, while "Ti voglio bene" means "I love you" or "I care about you" in a friendly/familiar way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lloydo3000

Hai ragione. "Ti voglio [tanta] bene" literally means "I want the best for you" and is used often. My friends have told me "Ti amo" is a lot more serious, when you might marry this person!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/atlasakin

Yes. You can even check the song called Caruso. I think it was about the romantic/familiar love Enrico Caruso has for her daughter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schatzie14

You Italian students are soooo much fun, Duo at it's Best, in the french course was no hot blood flowing, only brain juice dripping


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dumark53

Didn't expect they meant this translation. Usually one hears "ti voglio bene." More like "I wish you the best," "I wish you well."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LK1012

I just went here to read the comments lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caterinabella

If Uncle Sam were Italian, he'd say this!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellis930361

Just what I thought! ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielG443646

Couldn't I say Voglio tu?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AidennQueen

You could say "Voglio te" for emphasis. (see tonic pronouns)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Libellule808

I want you the right way But I want you to want me too Want you to want me, baby Just like I want you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/funnyiloveitaly2

This seems a case where literal translation and actual usage can differ. Interesting to consider that on this view love = wanting!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frALBERTAZZI

If someone knows spanish this is pretty much like "te quiero"- ti voglio, which is a bit like i love you but in a more casual way :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouMimzy1

This will be used.....a lot.....thank you for teaching me this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sunshinesaway

That was...forward. I wonder if that has ever worked for someone


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MishamMehadi

Duolingo getting thirsty


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blomeley

I think this phrase is usually used like i love you, but more between family members rather than lovers. is that right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/squaredomino

What?! Surely not...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blomeley

Yeah, its even in a book that I'm reading now. The parents often say to their child "Ti voglio molto", while lovers used "Ti ama". So I think the english translation would be "I love you", since "I want you" in english normally refers to the more sexual side of love...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muttley_

Your sentences needs some fine-tuning: "Ti voglio molto bene" (="I love you") and "Ti amo" (="I'm in love with you"). "Ti ama" means "He/she loves you" :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schatzie14

Thanks gor your " fine tuning"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schatzie14

Sorry, I always mistype thanks for your.....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrFreshey

Well, let's hope so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Undina

Seems like something you wouldn't want to mess up, huh?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominikKur6

Questo ho usato tantissimo,hehehe ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anautchronistic

Luglio col bene che ti voglio!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Generaliss1

This is the Voice of Italy!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Libellule808

I want youuuuuu....I want you so bad...I want you so bad that it's driving me mad, it's driving me mad...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Libellule808

Beatles? Anyone?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VenksIzod

Maybe Savage Garden's would make a good lesson:

"Ooh I want you, I don't know if I need you but Ooh I'd die to find out"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kastonas

:D Yup, this is the first thing that came to my mind, too :D Can't stop singing now :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I-AM-THE-STAR

I just love these lovely sentences filled with love and passion(cause I'm in deep love) ;~D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saoirse977884

Got damn DUO! What a cheeky little owl


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VenksIzod

Irama in "Nera" uses "Ti vorrei". That would translate to I'd want you, but the English lyrics translations say "I want you". but it was nice to understand "Lo vedi quanto ti vorrei"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariannaLe772386

Honestly, I'm confused again. In previous discussion someone explained that ti means to you. If that's so, this phrase doesn't make sense.

Also, if this is used for friends and family, then I'm curious how do you say it with the meaning it has in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muttley_

As in the English 'I love you' and 'I tell you', ti may mean 'to you' or 'you' depending on the verb.
'to you' when the verb is intransitive (ie needs a preposition). Ti parlo = parlo a te.
'you' when the verb is transitive (ie doesn't need a preposition when answering the question 'who/what'). Ex. Ti amo = amo te

I'm not sure about the second part of your comment. What is "this"? Ti is the pronoun for tu which is used when you are talking to/with one person you are in familiar terms with.
If that was a group of people, you'd need to use voi.
If it was a person you are not familiar with or a person you have respect for, then you'd use Lei'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VenksIzod

Ti is Tu (you) as an object, and when used that way it has to be before the verb. The I (or Io) is implicit because voglio is conjugated in the first person singular).

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