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  5. "부모는 자식이 있어요."

"부모는 자식이 있어요."

Translation:The parents have children.

November 5, 2017

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrejStas

I was told that in a real-life conversation you should say 부모님 instead of 부모.

~님 is used when giving respect to someone and calling parents without it would be rude.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SvedishPlumber

I believe you're correct, that is how i learned it as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaygreen27

yep. you're right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PanpanXo

Probably not necessary here as it is a broad statement


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FirdausJuzup

Not necessarily. This is a general statement that's not aimed at any person in particular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmunaVinograd

Can't it be translated to "parents are children"? I know it doesn't make sense, but still...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pbylool

the use of 있어요 means 'to have'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tina344732

How would you say "parents are children"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taytannies

Well i guess its "부모님은 자식이에요"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruno902532

I was always confused until I explored through various posts the difference between these 4 verbs: 1) 이다 (to be) vs opposite 아니다 (not to be) 2) 있다 (to exist) vs opposite 없다 (not to exist)

Depending on circumstances All 1&2 may at time be used as the English "to (not) be", but 이다 rather "to be (something)" while 있다 "to be (somewhere)" in addition to "to exist"

But only 2) may correspond (at times) to "to (not) have". I think that 이다/아니다 is more about intrinsic qualities, right? How a native/confirmed can correct or complement me! See https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/%EC%9D%B4%EB%8B%A4 and https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/%EC%9E%88%EB%8B%A4 and https://hinative.com/en-US/questions/1266818


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hanzo_Ergo

I think the ending would have to be 입니다 to mean that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/altf2junkie

Is the "the" implied? If so, what implies it, and if not, where does is it indicated in the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/William-KoDe

Not only is it not implied, it doesn't even make sense. ALL parents have children, not merely certain definitely specified parents. So the only natural translation of this phrase is "parents have children".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neonpinkeu

는 is not always a general statement. It can simply emphasize something potentially in contrast to other options.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nleconte

Right :)

Went a bit fast on that one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nleconte

You can't know without context.

So, if one alternative is missing, don't forget to flag it so they can add it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ejcasey

Agree - left correction 12/24/17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewEpp5

I like "offspring" as a translation of that word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talychaengie

'The parents have a child' wrong? What?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaSweetiePie

Is it more common for koreans to say "my mom and dad" versus "my parents"? Because I have only heard them say "my mom and dad."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterChoi89

자식 is child, 자식들 is chidren.. -_-)a duilingo ok?!!

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