"V tom slovu byla láska."

Translation:There was love in that word.

November 5, 2017

20 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yewtwteiyty

Why not "There was love in the word"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Praha2017

Both, "the" and "that" can be used. Your answer has now been accepted as well, I suggested it to the mods a while ago and they gave me a positive response.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rLhHbegJ

this sentence doesn't make sense in English. I would never use it. (native speaker)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanHenke3

It is also strange in Czech. (native Czech speaker)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ollyfer

The problem is less about the sentence itself rather than what it purports semantically.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ollyfer

But as you can see, the frequency is comparably low, regardless of the metaphor chosen. And while there are indeed many possibilities to see love contained or present in anything, the question is whether the metaphor chosen was precedented and thereby defined, or grasped out of thin air and with a confusing sound to the recipients. And this is where this sentence hit me, although I know that it is hard to maintain variety with an obviously limited vocabulary at hand. I thus did not mean to put blame on any of you creators of the Czech course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

How about "As he was leaving, he only said a single word to me, but... there was love in that word. I knew his heart hadn't grown cold." - sounds perfectly plausible to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ollyfer

Yes, OK, this does sound plausible to me too, but you finally did what I mentioned in my comment—you interpreted the possibility to write such a sentence, as has been done with previous sentences that could have been included in this course and would sound less bizarre than this one. Such as “The night was veiled in dark blue after sunset”, as an example. The novelty of the sentence sparked my interest, one could say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZenaSarky

This is a weird sentence. I can't imagine many contexts outside of literary ones where such a sentence would be uttered.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

If you read this discussion, you'll find my comment with an example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZenaSarky

Yes, I did read and saw that. Nevertheless, I find that sentence very contrived. When I was doing the task, I knew the answer, grammatically speaking, but doubted myself because it's so weird semantically. Examples in language learning apps (especially at this level) should probably not be so unusual or marked that they make native speakers ask themselves, 'What the hell does that mean?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

It's really hard to come up with sentences that are meaningful, logical, natural as well as useful all in one bundle given the limited vocabulary especially at this level.

Believe you me, you can find weirder sentences than this one in every language course, I've tried quite a few. Also, I find this sentence (at least in Czech) meaningful and only very slightly unusual/poetic (I'm not the author of it).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZenaSarky

Well, DuoLingo certainly has some weird ones, like 'where are you going with that nuclear waste?' (in informal Czech) or 'Are those spiders successful'? I take your point, but it wouldn't take that much imagination (or a basic corpus tool) to find more likely combinations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

It's fun and it has two major advantages:

  • People actually learn more from unusual sentences, it makes them think rather than just switch to autopilot. And they tend to remember more from them. Of course, it wouldn't work if all sentences were unusual.
  • Awareness of Duolingo spreads. I've seen a lot of screenshots on social media where people laugh at the strange sentences. The Hungarian course, of example, is famous for its flying kindergarten teachers even among people who don't learn Hungarian.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

One of my personal favorites is "Where are the useful sentences?" :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pollyhs

"V tom slovu byla láska." Why not Love was in that word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Although we often allow many possible permutations this sounds to me like it is saying something different. It is saying where love was. Láska byla v tom slovu. However, we do accept this Czech answer so I will leave this for others, who are better in English, to be resolved.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pollyhs

Thanks- don't worry. It means the same thing,. Its just a more dramatic way of saying it. More poetic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

I am not against this translation. I am just not the right person to be adding it. Someone else will have to judge the reports in the system.

Learn Czech in just 5 minutes a day. For free.