"I eat chocolate."

Translation:Io mangio cioccolato.

March 14, 2013

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/italikaren

are the "cc" in cioccolato and the "cch" in zucchero pronounced the same?

March 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

Yes. E and i make c 'soft', so they're pronounced like English "chay" and "chee". The h prevents this, so Italian che and chi are pronounced "kay" and "kee". (The double 'c' is just that, doubled, so it's "chok-kolato" and "zuk-kero".)

April 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/melens

Molto importante.

May 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/elisacesaj

Yes

June 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/faaryn

School would be so complicated in Italy. The sentences and words in the Italian language are so long. It is so worth it though.

May 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JonidaBinjaku

the exercise corrected me when i used "cioccolata" instead of "cioccolato" but in fact you can use them both.

November 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Mohammad856484

So, I guess that "Io mangio un cioccolato" is the same as "mangio un cioccolato"

October 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

Yes--like Spanish, Italian is a "pro-drop" or "null subject" language, meaning you can skip the pronoun when it's obvious from the conjugation of the verb.

July 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dmmaus

Yum!!

April 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ibryesn

When do you use 'al cioccolato' vs 'il cioccolato'?

September 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

'al' is a contraction of 'a' + 'il'.
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/a#Italian - 'a' is the preposition for 'in, at, to', and is used to 'Indicate the direct object', especially for emphasis.

September 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sojournerbliss

So is true you might say- al cioccolato -to say something is made of chocolate or something is in the chocolate?

September 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/GilCardena2

Is the "i" in "mangio" silent?

July 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

Not exactly, though it's subtle. More important here is its effect on the 'g'--without the 'i', this word would sound like the fruit 'mango'. As with 'c' (see my earlier comment, above), 'i' "softens" the 'g'—instead of the hard 'g' like English 'go', you get something closer to English "Joe" or "Geo".

July 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/jax280895

Why do they use mangio instead of mangia

July 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

It's the difference between "I eat" and "he* eats".

* (or she, they, it, etc.)

July 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/sahar279227

I don't know what verbs to use with he she ,they and... can someone help plz

August 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

What in the world does this have to do with the section on the arts?

November 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Gabe6842

Why cant you use un and have to use il?

December 20, 2016
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