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  5. "Přišel o dva zuby."

"Přišel o dva zuby."

Translation:He has lost two teeth.

November 6, 2017

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatharinaM882088

The word "Přijít" seems to be a very strange word. There are so many different meanings, depending on the preposition used with it, and also many phrases, when I look up the word in a dictionary. I try to understand, how a word with the meaning of "to come" can geht the meaning of " to lose", when used together with "o".

In German we have some some similiar constructions with "kommen": "Ums Leben kommen", oder "Um sein ganzes Geld kommen", here used in the meaning of "to lose". But we would not say it like that in connection with teeths.

Is "přijít o" used only for special phrases or is it the usual word for "to lose something" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

The word "to come" seems to be a very strange word. There are so many different meanings, depending on the preposition used with it, and also many phrases, when I look up the word in a dictionary. I try to understand, how a word with the meaning of "přijít" can geht the meaning of "objevit se", when used together with "up".

Consider all these https://www.engvid.com/23-come-phrasal-verbs/ and then ask, is it worth to search any logic in it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lyn581999

Prosím, proč je "Přišel o dva zuby" a ne jenom "Přišel dva zuby"? Děkuji!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zygro

Because without the "o" preposition, it's a different verb. "Prijít o (něco)" means "to lose (something)", while just "Přijít" means "to come". Thus, "Přišel dva zuby" would mean "he came two teeth", which you can see is wrong.

Think of it as something similar to English verbs "to like" and "to be like". They have completely different meanings, despite having only one short word difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosephMcCa775682

Why can't one write - He lost 2 teeth.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ollyfer

Because all numbers until eleven should be written out as words. And on Duolingo, you just write out all numbers, you are hardly ever asked to write four-digit numbers or numbers of more digits. Come on, it's just three letters.

(Yes I saw that you finished the Czech tree)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

Duolingo may have improved its handling of digits.

"He lost 2 teeth" tests "green," which means that it should have been accepted. By contrast, "He lost 4 teeth" tests "red," which means it would have been rejected.

But we have no report for "He lost 2 teeth," so we can't see exactly what you wrote, which means we can't tell you why what you wrote was rejected. Please ALWAYS use the Report button, even if you comment.

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