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"Es ist kalt, nimm meine Jacke."

Translation:It is cold, take my jacket.

November 8, 2017

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ariel.j.bi

Would it make sense to use a semicolon here to separate the phrases?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

At least in English, I agree that that would be better.

German seems to be a bit more tolerant of what would be called comma splices in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KMosuzu

But in English it should have some conjunction to connect two sentences. It is cold. Take my jacket. is preferable, I believe. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emil240380

W H O L E S O M E


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/William582165

I thought that if the vowel changed in the du conjugation you change it back in the imperative which would give 'nehm' instead of 'nimm'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/William582165

Nevermind, this answered my question:

'My assumption that Nimm is taken from Nehman'

Correct, apart from the spelling mistake -- the infinitive is nehmen, with the -en ending that's typical of infinitives (not -an).

ich nehme du nimmst er/sie/es nimmt wir nehmen ihr nehmt sie nehmen The endings (-e -st -t -en -t -en) are completely regular, and the vowel change -e- to -i- is also found in many verbs (e.g. geben: du gibst); the shortening from long -eh- to short -i- (which is indicated by a doubled -mm- after it) is irregular, however.

The command forms are nimm! nehmt! nehmen Sie! and are regularly formed from the corresponding statement forms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I thought that if the vowel changed in the du conjugation you change it back in the imperative

True for a > ä and au > äu.

I think that e > i and e > ie usually keep that changed vowel: gib! sieh! nimm! hilf! iss!

(Also, such e > i verbs don't have an optional second form in the imperative with -e; you can't say gibe!, for example.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/veganpanda

Why can't it be "It is cold, use my jacket"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MDaniels87

Because "nimm" is from nehmen, to take. "Use" would be something "Benutze meine Jacke", but you'd probably say something more like "Wear me jacket" which would be "Trage meine Jacke."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margalit1

why is "Es ist kalt" correct? In my german class we learned we had to say "mir ist kalt" if we wanted to say that it is cold in turms of weather and I always assumed "Es ist kalt" was in turms of an object but I geuss you would not say "mir ist kalt" if you are giving the jacket to someone else. So mabye is this situation you are assumeing the person reciving the jacket is about to go outside and "Es" is the replacement for outside.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

mir ist kalt means "I am (feeling) cold"

es ist kalt means "it is cold" (as in the weather in general)

Here, the speaker is not talking about their own subjective temperature, but about the temperature of the air, presumably that of the air outside.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Denise526954

So in using gendered pronouns, how do we decide which is appropriate? Does it work like Es ist kalt (the weather) Sie ist kalt (the air) Er ist kalt (the wind)? Or is that too confusing??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

es in this expression doesn't refer to anything in particular; it's just a dummy subject because there has to be some kind of subject.

it's like the "it" in "it's raining". You can't replace it with anything; it doesn't stand for anything; it's just there because the sentence needs something in the subject position.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oemerich

Your examples are 100% correct given you speak about those specific things which are cold.

Most of the time you would refer to the weather in general or to the situation in a room, where you would both times use the neuter pronoun 'es' just like in English 'it's cold (in here/outside).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margalit1

But don't say "Ich bin kalt" because you just shouldn't


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dizz

Unless you're emotionless?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oemerich

That's rather much insight. Normally people judge others to be cold/emotionless. ;)

Technically you're absolutely correct though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jrgen792736

Wenn es ihm selber kalt ist, erwartet er Dankbarkeit vom Gegenüber. Das geht gar nicht. Zumindestens sagt man es nicht.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UBoiii

Why not "Have my jacket"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shahzaib893074

Can someone translate these swntences based on my assumption that Nimm is taken from Nehman I take You take He/she/it take You (all) take We take


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

my assumption that Nimm is taken from Nehman

Correct, apart from the spelling mistake -- the infinitive is nehmen, with the -en ending that's typical of infinitives (not -an).

  • ich nehme
  • du nimmst
  • er/sie/es nimmt
  • wir nehmen
  • ihr nehmt
  • sie nehmen

The endings (-e -st -t -en -t -en) are completely regular, and the vowel change -e- to -i- is also found in many verbs (e.g. geben: du gibst); the shortening from long -eh- to short -i- (which is indicated by a doubled -mm- after it) is irregular, however.

The command forms are nimm! nehmt! nehmen Sie! and are regularly formed from the corresponding statement forms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StayHomeAstronut

It is cold; take my jacket.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UnitedEurope

"It is cold, use my jacket" is wrong. Why?

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