https://www.duolingo.com/daKanga

Arabic apps and resources

In light of the MARVELOUS news yesterday that Arabic for English speakers has entered the incubator, I thought it timely, while we wait for its expected release hopefully in the new year, for us as a community to share knowledge of resources that can assist in learning Arabic, and are free to use.

Link to the celebration post : Arabic for English speakers is now in the Incubator

I have initially posted it here, in the main Duolingo English forum, while we wait, very patiently, for this greatly looked forward to course to be developed. When the course is released to beta, most likely around Easter 2018, then I will move this post to the appropriate forum for English speakers to learn Arabic.

A resource I would like to share, that I have found most useful, is unfortunately only available on apple iBooks , through iTunes.
It is called "Let's Explore Arabic Alphabet, by Jawahar Khwaja and Shams Nelson.
It uses innovative teaching methods in a digital environment. And is actually developed and published by HADI (Human Assistance & Development International), located in Los Angeles.

And it is free :)
lets-explore-arabic-alphabet

Do others have recommendations of other apps and books ( including real books ) and internet resources, and dictionaries and grammar books, for English speakers ?

November 9, 2017

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Speir_

Thanks for the effort in making this, lindakanga! People who have no prior knowledge of Arabic will likely find this as a great assistance. :)

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/lushberry

You're a really nice user

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/daKanga
Mod
  • 134

Another great resources is available on facebook, at Duolingo Arabic Group
It has been set up by our very own modydj who is a Moderator and Contributor to the Spanish and French for Arabic Speakers courses here.

It is a closed group, so you will need to request to join. I also recommend resources that are properly managed such as this, to be of assistance in your learning journey.

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/dbriggs831

Thanks for sharing!

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/BeCreative__

Well I used memorise to learn the alphabet and I thought it was a decent source, but I think pairing it with writing is good.

Learning how to read phonetically with voweled kids books is a good way to start—I did a lot of this, and reading texts for me with no vowling became easier for me because I had spent time internalizing some of the patterns. I got some of these at my University Library, and maybe some library have things of this sort.

For people who get further along, FoosHaa kids shows on Netflix are good for exposure. I would say though, like even for me studying the language for a year, shows in dialect are still really hard for me to understand, even seperate words out.

I found this quite helpful:

https://arabic.desert-sky.net/verbs.html

I think building up a verb base in connection with understanding the root system, conjugation patterns, and MaSdr's along with other root formed words is good. This I found hepful for learning some verbs.

This chart is like godly—but I know of one error that was found in it, and like a lot of thing while learning arabic, I felt it was good to take things with a grain of salt very consistently because it is soo different from a lot of languages, and understanding how things work is a process (and not just like a quick explantation that 'oh! I finally get it.' There is a lot of stuff to learn). I recommend not memorizing the chart per say, but learning verbs that fit into the conjugation patterns; once I learned a few of these, I knew how to form other verbs in these forms. The thing I would say though is not everyone is walking around speaking FooSHaa, and learning this complicated stuff is exposure, absolutely, and it should help one with written material, but it is an error to think everyone talks like this. I found it quite a dissapointment, but for understanding structures within the root system, this is a good chart. I have my own explanations for part of it, and of course there are other resources, but not ones I know I would say are very useful.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2L9ts4qsjrqT1JzYXdXTXlHR0E/view

Or...

https://arabicportal.wikispaces.com/file/view/10%20Measures%20Chart%20-%20Malek.JPG/546976176/10%20Measures%20Chart%20-%20Malek.JPG

(I have a PDF too, or one can search 'Arabic Measure Chart' to find other versions...)

Other stuff—try to talk with people is a good idea to learn. Um, I found flash cards that incorporated grammar concepts like possessions, Idaafa, verb conjugations and forms, Masdr sentences, all integrated into ways one might want to speak to be very effective for building a usable vocabulary. This strategy was designed in large part taking into account how some of Duolingo works, while customizing it for myself to make it practical, and possible to learn new concepts by having them integrated in this stuff.

I know that was a lot to read if you got to this point, but those are some ideas to head in the direction of learning more about the language from my experience learning it.

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/daKanga
Mod
  • 134

Thank you EnzoKrensky , for this detailed and useful reference.

It is GREATLY appreciated !

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/BeCreative__

Happy to help!

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Hxvan
  • 1175

,':-(, So, Is the fuṣḥā(MSA) kids shows on netflix a free resource?, if it is not thank you anyway for sharing.

November 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/BeCreative__

A lot of people just have Netflix because—though it is a resource not all people know about. Go to youtube Hxvan. if you want a resource in that regard, though I was trying to be helpful with practical resources to actually learn the language. ¿Cómo esto te parece?

November 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Hxvan
  • 1175

Well, I give it green lights, but who asked the question, was expecting only free resources.

P.S.: please read my comment below and tell me your opinion about my reverse course methodology to learn Arabic.

November 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/daKanga
Mod
  • 134

I have just read about this post,
Arabic tinycards!

of decks of cards for Arabic are being made in Tinycards, by ARABIC_IS_COMING.

They welcome review of their work.

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Woof.

Thank you Lindakanga! :)

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/daKanga
Mod
  • 134

Also this discussion about Arabic resources:
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/20141317

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3

For those wanting to learn the alphabet, I think this Memrise course is set up in a way that's really useful: https://www.memrise.com/course/53083/how-to-read-arabic/

It's a lot more comprehensive than just letter names. It has them but focuses on what really matters: sounds.

http://arabicreadingcourse.com/ Not entirely free, but the part that is will probably be enough to get you really going in the above Memrise course if you're not familiar with some of the basic points of the alphabet (multiple forms of letters, the way vowels are or aren't written, etc).

For those with some grasp of IPA https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_alphabet will be an invaluable help in sorting out what all these unfamiliar sounds actually are. (And for those who lack a grasp of IPA, it might be something really worth looking into when embarking on a language with as many sounds pronounced as unfamiliarly as Arabic.)

November 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/wyqtor
  • 1619

The only reasonably good resource that works for me somewhat is the Memrise Arabic Course. Unfortunately, they disabled any typing for that particular course, so for the most part it is only a matter of selecting the correct translation. Also, there are no explanations about why this or that is said in some particular way. At the moment, the biggest source of confusion for me are all of those extra vowels that are being ”randomly” (from my perspective) added not only inside words (I get those, it is due to the Abjad nature of the writing system), but between words as well!

For instance: 'your telephone number' is رقم هاتفك, but it is pronounced something like 'raqmu hatifik'. Where did that additional 'u' come from, and are there any rules as to what vowels to add between words and when? I hope to see stuff like this clearly explained in the lesson notes for the upcoming course!

November 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas.Heiss

Check out the Memrise community where some programmer user script gods live: http://community.memrise.com

Despite I have not tested this particular Memrise Arabic course, I have great results with Cooljingle's user script "All typing" and "Auto correct" with my Portuguese course, user-created PT BR courses (e.g DuoLingo PT by MartinPen) and offical Memrise PT1-7 (BR) courses.

Once installed and you started the review session, you can find a new "all typing settings" point added to the left.
Here you can OVERWRITE the standard settings like "tapping, multiple-choice > 15 characters, etc.".

It may work different with courses like Arabic, Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Russian, where you have to use a different Non-Latin alphabet.

But Cooljingle has his own user script threads in the community forum, where you could probably ask for help / change requests or give further suggestions.

November 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/BeCreative__

Yeah, that is one of the issues of learning online. Your is confusing ❤❤❤❤ like that without explanations. And I am not saying learning in a class is unconfusing, but I understand how stuff like that is confusing.

November 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Woof.

Thanks Lindakanga!

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Maughanster_

Thank you, lindakanga!

November 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Hxvan
  • 1175

Here are the free resources, that I use to learn Arabic:

I learn it in this reverse course: https://www.duolingo.com/course/en/ar/Learn-English-Online

But before you do that I suggest these pages, in order to get basic knoledge. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet , https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_Standard_Arabic and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_phonology

To know the pronunciation of the words: here are good resources: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Wiktionary:Main_Page and https://es.forvo.com/

And finally to retain in the memory the words you learn, you can use the Flash Card Programme called Anki: https://apps.ankiweb.net/ which you will have to learn how to use it, but it worths.

By the way, here is the opinion of my favorite Esperanto youtuber, which uses Anki, giving tips on how to learn Esperanto, but those tips also work if you apply them to Arabic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tq_ad-CqBik

This video is also very interesting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HIVLfdRxdeI

November 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas.Heiss

Isn't Arabic already available on Mondly? https://blog.mondlylanguages.com/2016/05/24/arabic-language-lessons-everyone/

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/23524002/Mondly-languages-added-19-new-topics-to-their-tree

If you find a redeem code in one of the DuoLingo threads talking about Mondly or any other Internet blogs, you might be able to get a premium membership sponsered (only supported on their website for registering, not apps).

November 11, 2017
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