"The boy cannot read anymore."

Translation:Le garçon ne peut plus lire.

November 12, 2017

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LadyOra

What is the reason we don't need 'pas' here?

November 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ripcurlgirl

Because ne peut pas = cannot,
whereas ne peut plus = cannot anymore / can no more

The plus replaces the pas in this structure and implies that the boy can read but can read no more. ne ... pas indicates he cannot read.

November 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/nicholas_ashley

Ripcurlgirl

The English sentence is ambiguous as it could mean:

the boy cannot read anymore (because he is very tired)

the boy can no longer read (because he had an accident and is now blind)

I assume the French sentence is also ambiguous.

November 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ripcurlgirl

Thanks Nicholas. I realise the sentence context contains ambiguity but the translation is the same.

November 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/FJSoekahar

Ripcurlgirl, How about "NE PEUT PLUS PAS LIRE"

November 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RogerWorrall

Le garçon ne sait plus lire was marked wrong. We use savoir when talking about swimming so why not reading?

December 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/LeonardHer14

"Le garçon ne sait plus lire" would to me translate to him loosing the Knowledge of how to read, but i call it correct.

Since: il peut lire le livre= he can read the book

Il sait lire=he knows how to read

When talking about an ability i've leart to use savoir

February 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ChefeBispo

I disagree. The usual meaning of "Johnny can't read" in English is that Johnny never learned how to read, not that it would be a physical impossibility. Similarly, unless context dictates otherwise (e.g., he's just had a traumatic brain injury), "he can't read anymore" implies he's forgotten how to read.

February 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Patrick-Oz

I put "Le garçon ne lit plus" which I saw as the boy is literally not reading anymore. I was marked wrong. They want "Le garçon ne peut plus lire" which means not only that he is NOT reading anymore but that he CANNOT read anymore.

January 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/pimtine

What about "Le garçon ne sait plus lire" as in "the boy doesn't know how to read anymore"?

December 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TimaVolvov

Why is there plus after cannot?

December 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/yangzi

What would be the difference in meaning if it said "Le garçon ne peut lire plus"? Google Translate said "The boy cannot read more" as opposed to "The boy cannot read anymore"?

January 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mehgothack

i wrote exactly like that and it said it was wrong, the correct solution just puts up the same thing

February 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/cigobela

I guess it also means "The boy cannot read more." The sentence in the exercise means he cannot read anymore (because he is blind now). But on the other hand, cannot read more can mean that his eyes hurt or he needs some rest.

What I mean is that Duolingo says the sentence means something temporary, but it can also mean something permanent.

November 24, 2018
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