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"Un campesino cansado"

Translation:A tired peasant

April 7, 2014

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyoTa.SA

What is the difference between ''granjero'' and ''campesino''? Thanks in advance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eey91

Being a "granjero" means that farmer is your profession. Being a "campesino" just means that you live in the countryside


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyoTa.SA

Many thanks for your great explanation:-) Muchas Gracias


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donJhonK

I think that peasant is archaic in English. Campesino and peón should be read as farmworker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaelzion

Yes. We don't have "peasants" in the true sense anymore and the word has negative connotations now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce768614

Actually, we do, but we don't like to admit it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barrett718

Does "campesino" have the same negative connotation as "peasant"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judykeswick774

Yes the word "farmworker" should be accepted!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jackelly3

Wouldn’t farm worker be translated granjero?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuhailBanister

Agree re "campesino" (in many Spanish classes it has been assigned the meaning of "farmer") but "peón" is related to "pawn" in chess, i.e., lowest on the food chain--so it isn't likely that the latter word can be rehabilitated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Federico433593

I totally agree! In modern day usage the term is also derogatory (in UK English) and I always feel uncomfortable using it. However, I do use it in DL to be marked correct!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robertasmi12

It seems somewhat disrespectful to farmers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael189866

It really is time DL dropped the word ''peasant''. Are they teaching Spanish speakers that the English word to use is ''peasant''? They could end up being sued by people with broken noses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bRyYEFLL

Campesino also means farmer!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnB50197

In California, campesino is a farm worker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/icemule1

"A tired countryman" not accepted as of Aug 27 2018. Reported


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheEmood

that's me, the tired peasant


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sparkle1027

Im an English speaker and (at least where i live) "peasant" is an offensive word, that is never used! I understand that the direct translation of "campesino" is "peasant" but I'm curious how offensive or frequently used it actually is in Spanish??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuhailBanister

There is one exception that proves the rule vis-à-vis offensiveness. During the Spanish Civil War of 1936-39, Valentín González González was a colonel on the republican side and a rojo in every sense of the word. He provided a lot of material for Stalin's noise machine under his nom de guerre "El campesino." His choice was regarded as a gesture of defiance against the fascists, rich churchmen, large landowners and capitalists who allegedly despised and disregarded him because of his lowly origins. Ironically, his family weren't peasants, but miners.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndresKaz1045U

esta bien la tradutcion literal pero aki es mas usado un campesino mamado, mexicans abstenerse to coment xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SraWiggersdeOtte

Can't campesono mean country folk? I live on a farmstead and would rather refer to myself or my neighbor as farmboy or farmgirl.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davyboy57

Farmhand anyone?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vlg1616

What about "a tired villager"? Is that an acceptable translation?

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