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"Elle est jolie avec cette robe."

Translation:She is pretty in that dress.

1
5 years ago

139 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Rachopertrat

I don't think you would ever really hear this in English, you would probably say "She is pretty in that dress" or "she looks pretty in that dress".

129
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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In French, you can equally say both : elle est jolie dans/avec cette robe, but "to look lovely/pretty" does not directly translate to another verb than "être".

However, the French prefer "avec cette robe", because "dans cette robe" probably refers too directly to her body shape, rather than her overall looks.

154
Reply15 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NathanOverlock

People continue to say that on these boards that "since you can say such-and-such in French, you can translate it like that into English as well." This is simply not true; since the connotations in each language are different, the accepted English phrase needs to carry the same general meaning.

78
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

It does! The suggested translation is "She looks pretty in that dress."

22
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Renard_Urbain

Absolutely. "She is pretty with that dress" does not strictly mean that she is wearing the dress. It only implies a relationship between them. Cheese and wine are a reasonable example. You'd eat cheese with wine, but you would never put the cheese in the wine.

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohannaRhode

Thank you!

0
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mywifesnerd

Which is more commonly used?

18
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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"avec cette robe" - and in English "in this dress"

71
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sally410

It is really interesting when the two languages have a small but glaring non-match of expression. It seems to go way back to, say, a splinter off in Latin sometimes. Othertimes, maybe it is just like dialect.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peachy00Keen

I mean, English has Germanic roots, even though a lot of its words have been borrowed from romance languages. That difference in root languages might account for some of the discrepancies.

1
2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sky457559

"She is pretty in that dress" was accepted

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MThoriqMalano
MThoriqMalano
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Is there any way to distinct between "this/these" and "that/those" in ce/cet/cette/ces?

23
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Ce/cet/cette = this/that

Ces = these/those

Ce can also mean those/these if followed by sont and it means this/that if followed by est.

C'est ma robe = this/that/it is my dress

Ce sont mes robes = these/those/they are my dresses

164
Reply73 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reddlemans

Does French not distinguish between the different meanings of "this" and "that"?

9
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

If the French want to be specific and distinguish between "this" (something close by) and "that" (something far away), they can use the suffices -ci and -là respectively.

cette robe-là - "that dress"

cette robe-ci - "this dress"

Otherwise, as you have observed, they just use cette robe for either "this dress" or "that dress".

-ci comes from ici which means "here" and is also found in the demonstrative pronoun ceci (this). -là you may recognize is the word for "there", and is in the demonstrative pronoun cela.

Note that even though cela (that) is a marriage of

ce + *là* i.e. "that + there",

there is no accent on the "a" in cela. Needless to say, ceci (this) is a combo of ce + *ici* i.e. "this + here".

135
Reply52 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ASEQU

This is really helpful thank you!

7
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GehanThamo

Without tips and notes in the app version this was so hard. So thanks! This makes it more clear.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/___nebe

And how does one know which of Ce/Cet/Cette to use?

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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One can read the whole thread or the Tips&Notes in the lesson.

1
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KedarDeshp

Each of your above lines makes sense individually... But on a whole - hmm.. Still a lot to digest ! So we are saying Ce =this / that / these / those !!

I mean how do you keep track of that... or this or those....ah not again..

-5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Did the previous breakdown (repeated below) not clear that for you?

  • Ce if followed by sont = those/these

ce sont... = those/these/they are...

  • Ce if followed by est = this/that

c'est... = this/that/it is...

I cannot think of any other explanation simpler than that.

14
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oulise-uwu

'Jolie' also means beautiful, not only cute, but apparently Duolingo doesn't like my opinion.

9
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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elle est:

jolie = lovely or pretty

belle = beautiful

mignonne = cute

34
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ricaleyl

Can you explain the difference between beautiful and pretty in English? I would say they are the same.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blfbftg

This is the first time duolingo showed me jolie as "cute" ... I've seen lovely and beautiful, but this is new. A little frustrating to say I was wrong because I said "she looks pretty" as opposed to "cute"

-1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

You must have had something else wrong in your translation because the given and accepted main answer is "she is pretty in that dress". It is the answer displayed at the top. As far as I know "cute" is mignon in French.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SebastianB715208

this is annoying I said 'she is nice in that dress' and the correct answer it gave was 'it is nice with that dress'

2
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

I don't think either answer is correct. "With that dress" is grammatically incorrect. And saying someone is nice implies they have a good personality, which would have nothing to do with what he/she is wearing. You can say "she looks nice".... or "she is pretty....in that dress".

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EricTPage

Me too. I put "She is nice with that dress" and it corrected " It is nice with that dress." Arghh

0
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VVenderlyn

Doesn't avec means with?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

It does, but I am not sure what you are trying to get at since the fact that prepositions don't translate directly from one language to another has already been discussed in previous posts.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RodrigoDavis

She is beautiful IN that dress... but for an English speaker, even "with" would make sense, wouldn't it ?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Not to my ears. "With" makes it sound as if she is accompanying it, or vice versa, rather than wearing it.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RodrigoDavis

Of course - "she looks beautiful carrying a dress" :) Depending on the woman, she would look beautiful even carrying a dead cat.

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RustyMaypole
RustyMaypole
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I think "with that dress on" is the most usual idiom.

-2
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

I beg to disagree. "In that dress" is the more natural way to say this and more common: http://bit.ly/2CameXT

0
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carmina_banana
carmina_banana
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Ok, duolingo: I used nice instead of pretty, but why do you tell me this?:

You used the wrong word. It is nice with this dress.

Since when do we translate elle as it?

1
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Since words like "doll" (une poupée) were determined to be feminine.

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/solehah
solehah
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"she is pretty with that ROBE" is an answer, too? why?

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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To be frank with you, I still have not understood what a "robe" is in English (other than bath robe).

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

Watch Harry Potter, that's what robes are!

8
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shandisoocan

The "dresses" a church choir wears are often called choir robes. I think the thing a minister or priest wear over their clothes are sometimes clerical robes.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mathildabee

also, what a judge wears when he is sitting on the bench is called a "robe".

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/solehah
solehah
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Googled it. So "robe" does exist in English. Pardon my lack of vocabulary. Should google before I ask next time

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yemijoshua

there are choir robes as well...

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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In English, the term "robe" refers to the long outer garment worn by a judge, a priest, or students who are participating in a graduation ceremony.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smeylie

robe means Dress in english hope it help

-5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Thank you, but to me, "a robe" is a ceremonial garment or the gown of a lawyer or a terry bath "coat".

Which a dress is not, particularly in simple sentences like this one.

23
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuFarge

As an English speaker, I only know of robe to be ceremonial, as you said; or, a robe can be a terry bath cover up.

7
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KATEJ15

They can now also be very colourful and look like silk. Usually these are simple, floaty garments worn at home or perhaps on holiday, by the swimming pool etc.

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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BLPK
BLPK
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To my sense robe in English designates the shape of the garment, something that lies over the shoulders and is open in front though it can be tied closed with a belt. In effect this means something we commonly wear as a bathrobe or in some ceremony like an academic robe worn only on special occasions like graduation. It is different from a "cape" which ties around the neck and hangs mostly in back.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard
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The Oxford dictionary agrees with you. It would be very odd to call a woman's "dress" a "robe."

In the general sense of dress, one could say "His/her ceremonial dress included a long blue robe."

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nourdineoutis

hello sitesurf can you give me some explanation about "de" and "du" because i always mixed them when i write a clause if you answer use exemples thanks

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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I'm afraid your question is too broad and not related to the sentence here. Please ask such questions on the sentence discussion thread of the sentence you have a problem with. Thanks.

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6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carlosdelo10

Hi Sitesurf.

Robes are the long garments make-believe mages use, they are pretty much dresses in english too!

-2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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I know what a "robe" is, and it is not a dress for everyday life.

What you refer to is not "une robe" but "une toge", "une robe longue", "une robe du soir", "une robe de chambre", "une robe d'avocat"...

2
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sherinsunil

Oh thanks

-1
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/filipa.aguiar

a robe (english) is a peignor (french), at least according to google translate.

-1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiquidBlade

Is there a difference between "she is pretty" and "she looks pretty" in this translation? I feel like I should be using a specific word if I'm trying to say "looks/appears".

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SourireCache

Yes, the verb for 'looks/appears/seems' would be sembler.

So to say "She looks pretty": Elle semble jolie, I think. c:

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiquidBlade

Alright then, so similar to English, I'm able to say "she looks pretty" in the same way that I can equally say "she is pretty"... besides connotations that looks pretty is present tense, thus is not saying that she is pretty in general.

-1
Reply4 years ago