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  5. "你叫李华。"

"你叫李华。"

Translation:You are Li Hua.

November 15, 2017

273 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lan-done

How are chinese names said? Is it Li Hua or Hua Li? (So happy to see chinese on Duolingo!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellis930361

If a Chinese person's first name is Hua and their last name is Li, you would say their name as "Li Hua."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewLam419316

A bit confusing to call them "First name" and "Last name". I would say that Chinese names are given as family name (Li) followed by given name (Hua).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raf9971

Family name first, given name second


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DamilareDa2

In think that if you say it in pinyin it is ni xing (surname)Ni jao (first name)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WindyWendi

"ni jiao" is usually followed by one's full name (family name + given name)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lolz112_DA

But hia firat name is Li, and his last name is Hua, Thats the bug of Duolingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellis930361

Nope. It's actually the other way around. Her name is Hua, surname Li, so in Chinese it's said as Li Hua.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielDaNi411942

Family names are always put before the first name in China.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrcia273184

Yeah in Hungarian too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erica.looooo

Li is a common LAST name, Hua is a first name. In Chinese, we do last name then first name


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GubungWoof

His surname (family name) is Li and his first name is Hua


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liam910758

Last names are given first.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RL_1992

Sorry I saw them upsidedown


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/engfabiom

in Chinese, great things come first... as family, grandparents then parents... countries then states then cities, family names than your name...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crispy48154

Thanks. That tip should make things easier for me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WindyWendi

Great explanation. I always wondered why Chinese (and Japanese) addresses are written large-to-small.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/serenity904111

Love this explanation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mqstical

In Chinese, in writing etc. The last name goes first then the first name. In America they probably go (like regular) First Name. Last Name. So in America it will be Li Hua. But since you're doing chinese I recommend you do it the chinese way (Last First) to get used to it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caleb829123

They dont call them first or last names. Its family, then given. Just saying!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erica.looooo

In America it would be Hua Li, since Li is a last name and Hua is a first name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celcel94

You don't call it last name and first name in chinese. You call it family name and given name. For example, my chinese name is from my family name, Xin, and my Given name, Tian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/94lester

They say surname first


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abhinandan691881

I think the surname is said first


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CLhRQz

Surname/Family name comes first.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALucyPhan

My mother is Vietmamese, my father is Chinese. Pleasure to know you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KhaiJun1

What do u mean???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexisTommy

In chinese the last name is pronounced first like Johnson, Bob. So it will be Li Hua


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shernicorn

If it says Hua Li in chinese that means the name is Hua Li cuz in China first names are last so it's like (example: Fai Zhang in english it would mean it's Zhang Fai in Chinese)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hazel374040

Last names come before first names. So it is Li Hua


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shreyansh01

Jiao means call/called the why call is incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZivaAshley

NO it's not Hua le.It is like Hua


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eBrA438815

да согласна с тобой.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jake865720

Li hau so it the last ne then frist name


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AfsaYounou

After li it said surname and after hua it said first name so its hua li


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celcel94

It would be Hua Li since Li is a surname.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeohau

The dictionary help for 你 says "you" or "your". In English, the sentence should be "you're", which is the conjunction of "you are".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverBens6

I guess in Chinese they just use "You" rather than "You are" - you still have to correct it to proper English when you translate it though so it becomes "You're/You are".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverBens6

They corrected it. It now says "Your" and "You're" so it means both.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mkmichael2

Not for me on Dec 1st 2017. It says you - your.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I think It's normal. It means "you" and "your", but in many Asian languages, the "to be" verb can be omitted when it's obvious.

They include a normal dictionary, that define the words, not the way to build the sentence in the language you study.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lomochibi

That's because depending on context ni/你 can also indicate possession by itself. E.g. 你爸爸 ni baba - your dad.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RW8472
  • 1213

"Your" and "You're" mean completely different things ;) They cannot be interchanged.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GhappynowappT

Why the downvotes? "Your bent" = your inclination, and "you're bent" = you're corrupt. Relating that to my practice here - if I'm right, it should be ni3 de = your and ni3 shi4 = you're, which are of course different sounds and characters. A mistake in one language will lead to a mistake in the other. My point is that the earlier post is correct, "you're" and "your" are still not interchangeable, and the downvotes are unwarranted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Your name is... And you are called... should both works. As they mean the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sae885321

Contraction, not conjunction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RL_1992

That's not a conjunction, sorry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew-Lin

I am not sure if this is a common sense for foreign people, but just a reminder for those who don't know: In Chinese, the first name is followed by the surname. Traditional Chinese first name is mostly one character, some are two. And the first name can be one character or two, both are usual (the two-character-surname is more common). Since individual characters can have their own meaning, Chinese people usually use some characters representing positive meaning to name their children.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/icallmyselfLee

"First" and "last" names are really confusing.

It's FAMILY name, then GIVEN name, in China, Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Hungary, and small pockets in other countries.

Fun fact: the concept of a last/family name of lineage did not exist in most of Europe until some time around the Renaissance, which was directly caused by Chinese trade of ideas (and pasta) to Italy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David442942

Do you mean the first name follows the surname? So the pattern would be (Surname) (Firstname)?

I have wondered about Chinese people using some characters representing positive meaning to name their children. I have heard of this but I haven't "seen" an example of it. Could you provide an example?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ericspanner

Yes. Surname + Firstname.

Twists Li Hua into a girl's name and add Mei between it, you get Li Meihua 李美華. 美華 can be understand as good / beautiful ages. Also 華 to some extent can be referred to 花, a beautiful flower then.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RW8472
  • 1213

Thanks... Here is where (in my opinion) the course breaks, and I cannot use it. The throw names out like we are supposed to know the difference between first names and last names. Many of us don't. In the course they should note what type of names they are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PholaX

They tell you if you made a mistake, so you can learn.. on your mistakes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zesul

I hear "Li" being pronounced with a voiced post-alveolar stop (/d/) rather than an alveolar lateral approximant (/l/). :/ Is that how "l" is pronounced in rapid speech?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RW8472
  • 1213

I cannot hear a "Li" or "Di". It would be nice if the audio was better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrsatJuraj

When I put mouse to see name it is said just Li can you improve that please to be written Hua Li :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevinguy19

Each name is represented by a separate character.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arlen_Alexander

李 on its own is pronounced "Li" but in the whole sentence recording it sounds like "di". Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellis930361

It's the way they speak, what you could call their accent. Li is the pinyin form of the word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arlen_Alexander

Would you say that i can trust the Duolingo sentence pronunciation overall?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crispy48154

If you have Google Translate, type the word into it to hear another person pronounce the words. It helps a bit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

The recording isn't always accurate especially for characters which have more than one pronunciation or characters that have different pronunciations depending on the characters before and/or after them, so I usually turn it off.
Here 李华 is pronounced Li3 Hua2. There are no changes at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulBird10

Good question, I put 你叫李华 in google translate and it keeps Li as Li, need a native speaker to answer this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nahe2x

If you hover it says "your". not "youʻre". However the answer (which I got wrong) said "youʻre"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's called grammar. If you take a dictionary, and try to translate all the world in the order you find them, you will get only nonsense, in any languages. Many Asian languages omit the "to be" verb, where European languages use it. It's different grammar construction.

The dictionary translation for this word is "you" and "your", they're right, the rest is grammar construction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverBens6

I guess in Chinese they just use "You" rather than "You are" - you still have to correct it to proper English when you translate it though so it becomes "You're/You are".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iyoossaev

叫 can be also treated as a verb "to be named", just like in French, Polish, Russian, German, Spanish…


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverBens6

It now says both "Your" and "You're/You are" so it means both. They corrected it :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinSvolle

No, it doesn't. I just got a "you" or "your" and no other options.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SynamR

I L❤VE Duolingo it help me learn languages in a fun way like Chinese, Russan, Japanese and other stuff I learned a lot of languages and i still have so i want to give Duolingo this many stars 10000000000000000000000stars and more

Thank u

❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverBens6

I think I'm starting to understand it now. "You are called Hua Li" worked for me so this is what I'm learning:

你 - Ni - You are

叫 - Jiao - Called/Call

李 - Hua (first name)

华 - Li (surname).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikCLO

The thing is that Chinese do not require the verb "to be" to complete the sentence, so literal translation doesn't really work here. In that case: 你 - Ni - You 叫 - Called/call / Named/name 李 - Li (surname/family name) 华 - Hua (first name/given name)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/temacube

Don’t forget the tones - they are critical


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wolffangthewolf

你 (Ni) can also mean "you" sometimes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/animelady64

Isnt that what ni means all the time ❓


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lolz112_DA

No, the first name is 李(Li) ,and the last name is 華(Hua). But in Western countries, you always put last name in front of first name, i guess thats the bug of Duolingo. BTW, I am a native Chinese speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazyEinstein

Your post is confusing. Western countries always used First then Last name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellis930361

Chinese is spoken mainly in China (not a western country). We say it (last) then (first) in Chinese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

And Taiwan and where Chinese-speakers are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

We don't agree as to which is first and which is last. Family name then given name in Chinese and family name goes last in Western countries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YSdQ1Ztw

How would you say, "You called Hua Li."

Would that not also be

Ní jiao Li Hua. (你叫李华)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexander577428

I'm not very good at picking up the tones (just started) - can anyone provide pinyin for this? Thanks in advance! : )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie-Loui152096

I could not translate this as in the first previous name lesson there was no previous indication of the English equivalent of the Chinese characters! Not fair!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie-Loui152096

Am revising my own comment after I finally realized that clicking on light bulb I get some explanations. And that when a Chinese sentence has to be translated, you can click on each character to see the translation!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikCLO

The literal translation would be "You are called Li Hua" but that would sound awkward to most native English speakers, which is why, for education purposes, it should be translated as "You're name is Hua Li". To add some perspective, let's take the question "¿Cuántos años tienes?" In Spanish. The literal translation would be "How many years do you have?" Which wouldn't make sense at all if English is your mother language. In that case, I'm sure Duolingo would opt for the way more comfortable "How old are you?". Each language has its own set of rules, even if the linguists find common ground to study and to teach them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

You're right. Languages have different grammar and word order. I don't understand why people wan to have the same way to say something, the same word order, in every languages.

In French it's literally "I call myself + name". That's absurd in English, you have to put it in the right English order, and put "My name is". But you won't have I = my, call = name, and myself = is. The word are simply not in the same order, because the grammar is different.

Same thing here. (1)You - (2)are called - (3)name.

There is no more reason to include the "are" in the (1) than in the (2)

If someone speaks French, the Chinese construction here is closer from French than from English

(1)Tu - (2) t'appelles - (3) name

The "are" is nowhere in the French sentence... Remember that the English "are" is, most of the time, NOT translated in the other languages. It's only a form of immediate present, it has 0 meaning by itself!

English would say more naturally: my name is...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Careful "you're" means "you are", so it is "Your name is Hua Li."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

What's the meaning of "Hua" and "Li" ? (I know they are names)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanThurlow1

Hua is flower and Li is plum.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jordanchfung311

How can I explain this?

You are just asking why is "a" "a"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlivaAndrea

i do not like to much this chinese version


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lani_Zeppi

I got it wrong because I didn't put "you're, but 你 translate to you in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It translates to "you" or "your" but in Chinese the verb "to be" and its conjugations are not needed so we have to add it in where needed in English. "You are called Hua Li." or "Your name is Hua Li."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elisabeth3210

I think it would have been even better if duolingo could also teach how the characters are actually written, like stroke order. :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJcreation

Ni and jiao have similar meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CristyanSR

你是李华 -> Nǐ shì lǐ huá -> You are Li Hua。// 你叫李华 -> Nǐ jiào lǐ huá -> Your name is Li Hua。// I think it would be correct. Fix this。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hedi770625

The problem is that the man say Li Hua and then when I write li hua they told me that I am wrong I'm a little bit confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roro972634

You have to write it in a capital letter like Hi How are you. Did you understand i hope you do


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erica.looooo

Isn't "You are called Li Hua" your name is Li Hua"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

In English we would put "Hua" first and then "Li.", but otherwise both forms should be allowed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElChampion6

In the question before this question the translator said Zhang Ming and the chinese character was also Zhang Ming and I gave my translation answer as Zhang Ming too and I got it correct. So why is this Li Hua, question the answer is Hua Li instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Duolingo is allowing both word orders. I put "Hua Li" order and they told me that another correct answer was with Chinese name order with family name first. Sometimes you might want to say someone's name the way they would.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joana908538

During the lesson i wasn't thought the meaning of the characters before the sentence translation. This is making it hard for me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joana908538

I'm having a problem.. during the lesson the characters weren't explained before the test on translating the sentence so I'm finding it hard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VngHiuChan

I think "You called Hua Li"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

"You are called Hua Li." or "Your name is Hua Li." is correct for English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PCOS723715

What is the little dot at the end mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandomAfi

你好!The dot that is empty in the middle symbolizes the end of a sentence just like the period in English that represents the end of a sentence.<<


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/azbball

Beginner in Chinese, so kinda lost, but I took some notes and I hope this helps (someone more experienced, please correct me if I'm wrong)...

你叫 (Ni Cho) - Your Name Is/You Are

我叫 (Cho Wo) - My Name Is/I Am

i know the sounding is incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heylookaginger3

Just advice. Nothing really wrong. Should also give the option to say "You are called Hua Li". Accidentally clicked on "call" because I thought it said "called".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarthaBrad5

It seems like steps are skipped. I was clueless on this one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XavierRodriguez

In duolingo says as translation: you are called Hua Li, instead of your name is. And duolingo is saying that first can be Hua as a first name and Li second as a surname, and "your name is Hua Li" was OK after all to duolingo because I wrote that and they said correct but here is another translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/L73Rber

This is too confusing, witch is the name?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

"Hua" is the given name and "Li" is the family name. Chinese puts the family name first.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Itz_Shannyn

This is freaking hard ya''ll know. .(for me) Cuz like I am English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pearl69933

Same though i am chinese but i dont know how to write or read. I am mostly english now☺


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abim18942

I said you are hua li and it was wong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Capitalize names please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/namgyalthily

im confused, in chinese ni can be interpreted as you or youre?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Uka507871

you are called hua li


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stupedfatidiot

how do you write my name in chinese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_leafdrops_

asian languages be like: -consistency? what's that? -what's the letter 'l'? (minus chinese) -last name THEN first name -last names are either really easy or really hard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrnThHiNin

it is really hard, i can't understand it well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatiKRK1

I belive it will be simpler to translate it just as "Your name is Li Hua".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

That's 你的名字是李华。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sikeryali

Name order can be memorized but what about poor voice here? Li is pronounced as di


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gino790380

If you are asked to repeat Li Hua, why should you answer Hua Li? It makes no sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Some people are asked to translate to English. Many exercises for this sentence come here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diana536668

What is the diferent in chinese between: You are Lin Hua and you are called Lin Huan ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Spelling : "You are Hua Li." and "Your name is Hua Li." and "You are called Hua Li." should all be accepted and Duolingo allows Chinese name order also in the English sentence for "Li Hua".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hermes732007

I would like to know if these the way to ask what's your name?, In chinese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrinityARMY

the names are confusing me i put the names backwards


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amritshrof

I don't understand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SandraPand11

This is very confusing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chzsr.zsr

Я один тут русский чтоле


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clau195646

What is the reason the translation "You are Hua Li" is wrong for this sentence and the translation "you are called Hua Li" is the right one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marli331664

I've got this question right tgree times but it keeps saying I'm wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kit-Wah

"Li Hua" should also be accepted as answer. I made this mistake now twice, and it totally depends on the perspective whether you say "Hua Li" or "Li Hua."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

English name order is usual in English sentences, but Duolingo is allowing it now for you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimeonVict

我笨的手机 keeps auto correcting Li to Lisa or Like.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueSteveMCandRB

I did it for a test sorry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amaris631284

When was this taught to me? Am I supposed to use my health guessing??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1Y0x4

앞이 성이네요


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fransiscaaaaa

IT SAYS YOU CALL ME LI HUA WHAT THE HECK


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicoleSanA14

Your and you are basically the samw


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celcel94

Problem is that they say you are, when it should be your name is... Also they make beginners confused with the Li hua being family name first or given name first. Family name comes last, but here they say the family name first when they speak, which is correct but allow both when writing. It's confusing for most and unconventional.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

The other alternate translation is "You are called Hua Li." which does use "you are", so for tiles you can always make a correct translation even if it is not the one you were thinking of.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasEro

This question needs to be reviewed. The answer in English is "You are Hua Li" not "You are Li Hua"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaylorJPar

I'm not confused about this sentence, but learning to spell chinese names with english characters seems unproductive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulREmery

I have had the system correct me both ways. It seems arbitrary which are forward/reversed or allowed/wrong. :-/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiorKasten

Not sure if it's a bug but for my ears it's not at all what I am getting from the sentence voice recording.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan3599

So confused, I can't put "your name is Li Hua"?? Its really the same thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coca1308

the speaker didnt work so i could hear the instructions


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ava849267

Im glad i got this one right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan279689

Confused on this translation to English .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Taylor547745

This is wrong, the translation should be "your name is Li Hua". "You are Li Hua" is "你是梨花”.....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruniac

Gee! I can't help but hear 张 in the place of the 2nd character here. Did anyone have the same problem? I was so sure :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruniac

Gee! I can't help but hear 张 and duokingo says it's 叫. Is that really right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_hgh
  • 433

I have a hard time reading chinese characters! I mean how do we supposed to learn the pronounciation of chinese characters?! I'm totaly clueless


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ben510602

It judges me by capital letters


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatricioAl725899

It would be helpful if the pinyin is written below every character in sentence and/or in sliding tip when clicking words, since writing/char learning by memory is nearly impossible to learn for Non-Chinese, without pinyin to sustain familiarity with 5 tones (āáǎàa) and r, zh, x, sh, ch, q sounds, would be almost guessing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Unicorngamer141

kinda having trouble with the names??? Can u translate them?????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandomAfi

你叫李华-ni jiao li hua means your name is Li Hua but if i say 我叫李华-wo jiao li hua that means my name is Li Hua.姓-Xing means last name so if xing is infront of a name than that automatically means that name is a last name the duolingo example names so far are li,li hua,zhang,zhang ming,ming,wang. I hope that helped you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brahmi42173

As we are learning Chinese for the first please give the meaning of that particular name or thing.whatever it is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael22829

It should be "you are called" rather than "you are". 叫 means "to call" or "to shout", it doesn't mean "to be".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dwiva.d

its hard too speak up


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Loving_inch

Is the little circle at the end a dot?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

That is what they use to end their sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanMa16489

Think correct answer should be "Your name is..." Or "you are called". "You are (Name)" can be different than "You are a fish" or "you are sad"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sabirabanu1

This is confusing the slang is difficult


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benjaminmo299995

what does that mean lolz \

'""'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.FDPfEu

Please English words MA do Chinese words


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.o01YoT

How to start learning names for a biggner


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gelareh173723

Why "your name is" was wrong answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.dohMAC

In my family I first to learn Chinese hua li


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jason978238

You might update microphone time sated words right act like i didnt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

What are you trying to say? It seems to have something to do with the microphone, so try reading here: https://support.duolingo.com/hc/en-us/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&query=microphone&commit=Search


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bimojohan

Is a really necessary to use word "jiao" in every middel sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dhairyaash

What is meant by li hua


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fastij

Я одна тут русская?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beata841031

Sorry I am from poland


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie912943

I pronounced it correctly but your audio is not accepting it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lenzythebi

The coolest is that this is so easy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haylex641

Ok so a Chinese persons first name would be the last name and the last name would be the first name, basically they are switched and they are oppisite. Gotta keep that in mind!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FaithTam

its confusing..why is it there is an added word "are" yet it doesnt appear on the meaning itself?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben30138

I don't want to learn Chinese characters. Better to have an option to only learn to speak. Most people are not intetested to read Chinese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AsitGanguly

In voice over of the Chinese sentence, I hear "dee" sound for 'Li'. Is it a mistake or it has some explanation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ovinius

Both You're name is Hua Li and You are called Hua Li should be acceptable answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike112317

I did it right the first time


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asahel819796

Chinese names are surname first and first name last Landon933667


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seb852394

Sounded like the dude was saying ni jiao di hua. Hard to get the right thing if the l sounds like a d


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth877468

Can you have tansaltion before you have is do the word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arthur574331

Wrgghj bcc grdd , bc cchargeback x:-S:-S:-o:-o:-S:’(:-S:’(<3<3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tony746522

I know little bit Chinese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shahid715441

Its sounds D when pronuncing Li why it is


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emma781666

IT ONLY SAID TO SAY "JIAO LI HUA" NOT "NI JIAO LI HUA"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vashu457700

Anyone uses wechat & want to improve his/her chinese then send me request on. Wechat id ' love_you_vashu ' . We will learn toghether...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roninomadv

Stupid li hua lesson. Fix it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RuthSalced1

Pliufejhgv hai no rnmm no entiendo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hiimkos

I only got this for saying LOL dolls so I'm waiting for him to leave me and Miss leaving comment and see inside actually works


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruby216441

Hey Landon do you go to Chinook trail elementary and your in Mrs. Kirkes student?? Anyway I am Ruby.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DamilareDa2

I dont understand chinese names


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bill949306

This is ❤❤❤❤❤❤.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlinSantos

OMG. WHAT IS THIS LANGUAGE. SO HARD. LOVE IT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leejieung

"你叫李华." = "Tu t'appells Li Hua." : is that right??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GhappynowappT

"Tu t'appelles Li Hua" - I think that's right, "you call yourself Li Hua." The point I see here is that "Your name" and "you are" and "you call yourself" are all about the same idea, but shaped differently in different languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shweta983414

It's you called hua li


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Capy430178

You are called.... i don't understand that idea at all. If we're supposed yo translate it directly how are we supposed to magically know "are" should be there? And that's geamatically incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kimbo937909

I wrote "You are Li Hua" and got it wrong even when thats the correct translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sarahY656418

It is both (Polyglot Morty


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shweta983414

Its you called hua li


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FdsTre1

Fudg d fghtv ycbh gxgc fhd gx g fct f đh c t d c y d gxcg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stupedfatidiot

How do you write my name in chineese can someone tell me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stupedfatidiot

how do you write my name in chinese? can someone tell me????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stergi3

English character transliteration could be useful. I don't know if it is the best method though to learn how to read Chinese. Characters


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NatureSheriff_7

If you're referring to the use of Hànyǔ Pīnyīn, then yes, that would be useful for learners to learn how to pronounce/read Chinese characters.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soomi909553

You didn't make us learn these


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bluebeaty56

this is totally unaccetabel i don know how to chinwese than u vewy mush


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/isaiah721077

We think we should write Li Hua,so that's why they write it surname and first nam3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soei8

망할 갑자기 고난이도로군..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sammy555174

I DO NOT KNOW CHINESE

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