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  5. "You are happy."

"You are happy."

Translation:你很高兴。

November 16, 2017

84 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Bon_

What is the difference between 我很高兴 and 我高兴?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazyEinstein

You wouldn't say 我高兴?It's a set phrase with 很。(Cred: Mr.Elia)

Since 是 is not used with adjectives, 很 is used in replacement.

"Tips and notes

When we want to describe something we don’t use the verb “to be”, we have to put something else before an adjective. The most common word used to do this is 很 hěn, which literally means very. It goes between the subject (who or what we are describing) and the adjective (what we are describing it as). Since 很 is used so often like this, it oftentimes doesn’t mean “very”, just a link between a noun and an adjective."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zarainia

I don't know, I'm a native speaker and while I'm not sure if I've ever said "你高兴", I definitely don't consider "很" to be meaningless, and "你很高兴" isn't a good translation for "You are happy".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/s9iPQMX3

What would you consider to be a better translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bonnie528462

I remember my Chinese teacher explaining to me once that Chinese sounds very awkward with an odd number of syllables in a sentence or phrase, so sometimes another word is added in to even it out even if it's not really needed for clarity. So in this case, 'hen' seems unnecessary to us but the sentence sounds awkward without it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jenny611574

but why when chinese people asks Are you happy? they say 你高兴吗 in that case they dont use 很.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nar781477

Because it's a question and not a statement(describing something) is what im thinking. Just like you don't say "ni hen hao ma?" You say ni hao ma? (You good?, how are you?) So im guessing saying someone is good should logically be, "ni hen hao".

The statement "you are happy" is "ni hen gao xing", for that reason. The question form is "ni gao xing ma", and not "ni hen gao xing ma". In that case, you might be asking: "are you very happy?". I'm not a pro at Mandarin so just double check to be sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pabu-45

Idk but i would guess its because of it being a question not a phrase


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jigglymind

maybe thats just the slang way of saying it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuvekshaN

Thanks! This is very helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/febBmG

That is not right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maskador

你很学霸。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YJKIM707400

我很高兴 means "I am very happy" and 我高兴 means "I am happy". But, normally, using 我很高兴 instead of 我高兴.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xiacristina

我很高兴 is "I am very happy" and 我高兴 is "I am happy"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aviva328416

the difference is i am happy and i happy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BriannaHar146045

I know right i dont understand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/googols

很 is used when the adjective is without any adverb? Sorry the source is Japanese but I put it :http://calend-okinawa.com/culture2/chinese/henzhongwen.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KendalConr

Thanks! As someone who can read Japanese, that was a helpful read. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KendalConr

私は日本語が読めますので、役に立ちました。ありがとうございました!

中国語も英語も(スペイン語も)頑張ってらっしゃいますね。☺️


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ENYACHUAHM

No difference, is same things


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoorPaarKraat

I think the first means "I am very happy" and the latter "I am happy". Duolingo's software seems a bit picky about when it views both as correct, though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lene_Marlin

THERE IS A ''VERY'' IN THAT SENTENCE


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xiacristina

IT SAID TO TRANSLATE "You are happy" INTO CHINESE BUT THEN THE TRANSLATION IS 你很高兴, WHICH IS "You are very happy". SO YES, THERE IS A "VERY" IN THE TRANSLATION BUT THERE SHOULDN'T BE BECAUSE THE SENTENCE IS "You are happy"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RebeccaJ56

When talking with my teacher, she said that 很 didn't mean very in the same context as it does in English. In English, 'very' is used as a word for emphasis, whereas in Chinese, it doesn't have the same effect and acts more as a filler word i guess?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GloriaWang12

Okay Thanks you for letting me know!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_notasdf

It is I am very happy and I am happy. I feel there is an error here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrewcarroll

Other prompts accept 我高兴 as an appropriate translation for "I am happy". If 你很高兴 is grammatically preferable to 你高兴 , then that should be made more obvious. Why is the lack of 很 acceptable in a 我 statement but not a 你 statement?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/capriciousnerd

This exactly. Since the accepted answer for the 我 statement was 我高興 (I use traditional, since that's what I'm more familiar with), there should be a much clearer explanation as to why 你很高興 is the correct answer and 你高興 isn't. (I know that I've often heard 很 used in the manner explained in an earlier post, in front of adjectives. But the lack of a grammar explanation makes it frustrating when one slightly different option is accepted while the other isn't.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nevin711542

The real 'very' before an intensity modifier of feeling (eg happy) is actually 'fei chang' not 'hen'. Hen is consistently 'very/really' for a verb (eg hen xi huan) but for a modifier/compliment for feeling it is a 'be' verb filler - accept it cause it ain't changin for us!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kahrlee

I am a native speaker of Chinese and I was confused of the "very" in the translation. I realized that whenever I am stating that someone is happy, I would say in translation of English, you are very happy. Saying "you are happy" in Chinese sounds like a question of "Are you happy?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xiacristina

很 means very, but the sentence is "You are happy", and not "You are VERY happy", therefore this answer should be accepted and the answer is technically wrong...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angelstring

很 is normally used to mean 'is'/'are' when linking a noun and an adjective. it can SOMETIMES mean very, but 'you are happy' is a correct translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cazime

I got this from another website, according to Tang Ho:

高 = highly; 兴= delighted

高兴 = happy; glad; delighted

Describes an emotional state of being delighted

|

开= open; 心 = heart

开心 = happy; joyful

Metaphorically describes an effect of being happy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/200774.

is hen necessary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Woof.

Is this literally a Chinese greeting?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellis930361

Not really a greeting, but it's used. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IztrqrVV

adding the 很 would emphasize it, so the translation should be you are very happy. so this is wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarlRyanC.

It can also be translated as 你很开心 (你很開心)。Both 开心 (開心) and 高兴 (高興) are accepted, as they both mean happy or enjoyment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pr0skis

The system's correct answer translates into You are VERY happy.

Either fix the solution or just add "very" in front of happy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amyhasnolife

为什么“你是高兴”是不好?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarlRyanC.

Because 高兴 (高興) is an adjective, so it must be preceded by 很 not 是。是 is usually for nouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elinew98

Why isn't "开兴" correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GMQM7

Since there is no such word in Chinese...only 开心 or 高兴


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellis930361

There has to be a subject


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartijnH.

Where is the word "are" or "is"? It's all new for me so I am a little confused haha.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephleest

Review Greeting 2 tips: "When we want to describe something we don’t use the verb “to be”, we have to put something else before an adjective. The most common word used to do this is 很 hěn, which literally means very. "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverBens6

Thank you. So "很 hěn very" is used instead of "Am/Are/All are" etc? That makes sense now :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nes15789

我高兴 it is incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OscarBillW

你很高兴 should be translated as ''You are very happy'' since 很 means ''very.'' ''You are happy'' would be '你高兴'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarlRyanC.

Not really. 很 does not always mean "very". Sometimes, it is used as precedent of an adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bootbun

Hen is 'very' but there is no 'very' in that sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angelstring

it can sometimes mean very, but usually means 'is' / 'are'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaMic2018

很 means very and it's not necessary to express happiness.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RicardoEsp509059

the word hen means "very" so the answer would be "you are very happy". Am I right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WoojinJang2

English users, do you use this sentence? "You are happy." or "You are sad."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lims41

Why does 很 always have to be included?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lex730640

So what is the difference between 开心 and 高兴?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paugam795024

pourquoi toujours mettre : ni hen gao xin Ni gao xin ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Palmeee

the translation says "you are very happy" cause it has the caracter "hen" and the question is to write You are happy, not very happy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TailsPH01

Why is not acceptable 我高兴? What does 很 means in this context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GloriaWang12

what is the difference between you are happy?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrnGiaBo310095

What is the difference between 你高兴and 你很高兴?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GryTea

很 means "very." Sometimes, people exaggerate things and use 很 without actually meaning it, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sneha604058

你很开心。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aviva328416

they took out the timed practice


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PurpleBurple

Any native speakers here? Do people normally say 你很高兴 instead of 你高兴? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PurpleBurple

Do people not say 你高兴 instead of 你很高兴?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gino790380

Why leave out the word--hen--meaning "very"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kittycheshire7

你高兴 is not necessary wrong though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sakota3

This translates to "you very happy" not the example it gives, its wrong can someone fix this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephenXVII

Doesn't 'ni hen gao xing mean' you are very happy? Instead of you are happy? It marks me wrong if I put you are happy. All help is appreciated


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AugustusMTG

我高兴。 = I am happy. 我很高兴。= I am very happy. so both translation should be accepted as correct by Duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AugustusMTG

This Chinese section contains the most confusing "Chn to Eng" translations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jewzip
  • 1007

Why is hen3=very omitted in the translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AileenGuan

很=very. 你很高兴 would be 'You are VERY happy.' So the translation for 'You are happy.' should just be ‘你高兴。’which is acceptable in Chinese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xiacristina

THANK YOU, FINALLY SOMEONE UNDERSTANDS


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angelstring

no, 很 is usually used to link nouns and adjectives. it CAN ALSO mean very, but usually it doesn't. "you are happy" is correct

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