""

Translation:Zero

November 16, 2017

96 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zinthak

Curious, a 15 stroke character to represent essentially ''nothing'' lol.

November 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It doesn't surprise me, as in Asian philosophies, "emptiness" is a complex concept.

December 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eric810050

An interesting aside, the Hebrew word for "emptiness" is the same word for "vanity". So in the English translation of the Christian Bible, when Solomon goes on and on about "vanity" (vanity of vanities), he could have been saying "emptiness of emptiness"...which seems to put an Asian type philosophy onto the whole deal. Also, ideas in mathematics of the infinitesimal (so small, that it might as well be zero) are very complex and seem to be the same as what AloeSoothe describes as the evolution of this Chinese character for zero.

April 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yvan479759

:O

February 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Songve

I think "emptiness" is incorrect. "Spaciousness" seems a better translation of what they are referring to. Nothingness in Zen is a delusion.

June 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celina592592

Ya.

July 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AloeSoothe

“零”[ling 2] appeared long time ago in ancient Chinese.
It is a two-layer structure character that composed of the variant of“雨” [yu 3] (rain) and“令” [ling 4] (command/lead) meaning the drizzles before a storm. It happens when the dark clouds come, they only deliver a little raindrop. Soon the nimbus moves away capriciously, and the expected downpour doesn’t happen at all.

That “not at all” seems to touch the rim of “zero”. Yet indeed, at first “零” didn’t mean "nothing", but“bits and pieces/odds and ends/trivial/not much” instead.

“零头”[ling 2, tou 2] (bits + residual= the extra part of a figure besides an integer that ends with one or more zeros)

Eg: The “零头” of “5007.49” is “7.49”, with the integer being 5000.

The “零头” of “1234” could be “234” or “34”. So, the integer you see is 1000 or 1200, depends on how you perceive the figures.

When you go shopping and bargaining at a Chinese retailer, try making a counteroffer “美女/帅哥!Let’s remove the 零头” and persuade the shopkeeper to reduce the price from 125 yuan to 100 yuan.

Another example: “一百零八”[yi 4 (change tone from 1 to 4 as followed by a tone 1/2/3 character), bai 3, ling 2, ba 1] (a hundred and eight -- 108) meaning besides 100, there is a bit more (eight more). As here, 8 is the “零头” and 100 is the integer.

As the Arabic numerals were introduced, people matched“零”with “0”. And from then on, “零”has the meaning of zero.

Two Chinese characters could represent zero.

“零” is one of them, and “〇” is the other. In the Chinese number system, they have different usages.

“零” is for numerals in general/measurement.

Eg: “九百零九”[jiu 2(change tone from 3 to 2 as followed by a tone 3 character), bai 3, ling 2, jiu 3] (nine hundred and ninety-nine -- 909)

PS: For legal documents and bank cheques, people use“零” as it has more strokes and is harder to be falsified.

“〇” is specific for page number or year/serial numbers.

Eg: “二〇一八年” [er 4, ling 2, yi 1, ba 1, nian 2] (Year 2018)

PS: “〇” is a Daoism character. Its variant forms “中”[zhong 1] (central/middle) with a vertical“一” [yi 1] (one). “中” means “允执厥中” [yun 3, zhi 2, jue 2, Zhong 1] (integrity/honestly, keeping promises/observing rules, those, justice/fairness), which is an idea of governance. That’s another meaning of “中”in“中国”[zhong 1, guo 2] (China/central empire) besides “center/ middle”.

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karuna8063

Thank you so much. I learn so much from a little history and understanding the depth of meaning, and how the meaning became associated with the character. Wonderful specifics. Very much appreciated.

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/allie1001

Look it up and make sure it's true

December 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarriottPlayer

It's especially curious when all numbers 1 thru 10 are four or so strokes at most. But from my past studies, I can't say "0" is ever used all that often.

November 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazyEinstein

I have seen it in words such as 零钱 (língqián) change and 零食 (língshí) snack.

November 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew-Lin

Because 零 originally means "trivial" as in the examples you have given. :)

November 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Change as a money. So literally "trivial money", and snack = "trivial food". Is there a link between "zero" and "trivial"?

December 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElMeuNom

Zero is a very small number, so I guess that's where the connection is.

August 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caleb829123

Very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very tiny, as there is nothing

August 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MauroEzequ6

13 strokes

December 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Citronnier1

13 strokes actually. You probably counted some curvy stroke as more than one.

January 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MBH3691

I counted 13 as well

May 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manuel_Lujan

Fortunatelly, it has an alternative symbol: 〇.

August 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guierrmo2

Exactly my thoughts! I put a lot of thought into memorizing the structure and then to find out on the next screen it means nothing...

May 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OTraverso

They are using the "0" digit too... :-)

May 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pye20

零 • Líng • Zero • 0

July 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xx1212

"Zero" is a historically recent concept. That is why it has a more complex character.

November 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mathcore

i like how they don't teach you anything except how to make sounds in this course, then pop quiz you on what those sounds mean.

November 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverBens6

Hover over the character and it will give you the translation.

November 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karuna8063

You can't hover on most of these exercises. There is no translation. You can only hover when they get to sentences towards the end of the lesson.

December 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scoreperfect

Good to know, thank you!

November 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philipp964998

How do you hover on mobile?

December 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BerA.DC

Tap on it

January 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeanneordarc

You press down on it.

December 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChocolateMew2

Is this from traditional Chinese, or simplified?

November 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soyunpenguino

Both traditional and simplified Chinese write zero the same way.

November 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElMeuNom

This course teaches simplified (at least, it has so far), but as someone already mentioned, this character is the same in both.

August 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kapos

What about 〇?

November 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeanneordarc

It’s the same as the difference between 0 and ‘zero’, just between the digit and the word. (I assume that’s what you’re asking about)

December 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, but they also write: 〇 一 二 三 四

So, they are numbers (figures), but they can also be words at the same time? I don't know if they have a clear border, as we have, between the word and the figure (eight/8)

December 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jordanchfung311

No, I don't agree!

Chinese usually write 零,一,二,三,四 or 零,壹,貳,參,肆

January 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/muizzsiddique

Are the latter characters actually 0-4?

June 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scoreperfect

Hold it - when did they teach 零 means "Zero" ? Note to Duo Lingo: Teach then test - not the other way around! haha. They do this all the time. You need to first "get it wrong" to be taught it. Oh, sure, that makes sense...

November 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverBens6

Umm... actually you can just hover over the character in the sentence to get the translation. Hope that helps.

November 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karuna8063

except that is no sound so you can't connect the sound with the character AND the meaning all together. frustrating.

December 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scoreperfect

Will try that next time, thank you!

November 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/buhdahto

'Nought' (not naught) is the more commonly-used term for 'zero' in the United Kingdom. All Brits understand 'zero,' but use 'nought.'

November 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndersBorje

What about nil and oh?

December 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikeyjkk

They are used as well, less formal though. More common to hear than read.

April 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZahraJahro

i dont get why there is two type of writing?

December 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karuna8063

Do you mean the Simplified and Traditional script? If so, they are just two ways that the Chinese language has evolved over the years. There are many more scripts for Chinese that were used even earlier than the Traditional but only scholars, historians and calligraphy painters tend to use them. The traditional script has been used for a long time. When the Communist Party came into power they wanted to make it easier for people to read and write Chinese so they simplified some of the characters. Therefore there are now people alive who use one or the other or both.

December 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeanneordarc

Like Karuna said, there are historical reasons for it. However, this course and most other Mandarin courses teach simplified characters only.

December 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverBens6

What do you mean by two types of writing?

December 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Traditional and simplified.

December 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeri893412

They still use traditional characters in Taiwan

January 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jordanchfung311

Not only Taiwan! But also Hong Kong, Macau and some southeast cities.

January 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/weirdnerdykid123

i put 00000000000000,0000000000000000000000000000000000 and it worked XD

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hedwig321297

Does anybody know where I could learn how to write the different strokes in a character? If I understand correct it matters which stroke comes first and the amount of strokes in them. Thanks!

November 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.Ace.

Not sure if I can link to other sites, but there's a useful one I use called "mdbg" that I use. Bit annoying to figure out at first, but first search the pinyin (if you also add the tone number it helps limit the results), then hover over the arrows for your character, click the first button to break down all the characters, hover over it again and you'll see a button with a paint brush and it will animate writing the strokes in order.

If you play around further with the options, you can also have them break down the components/radicals in the character if you want to go more in depth (only helpful some of the time since the meaning is sometimes irrelevant if it's the phonetic component)

January 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/weirdnerdykid123

you might want to try some apps on your phome or ipad( if you have one)

November 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karuna8063

My local library has some Chinese calligraphy books that show this.

November 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elguerreroavila

Litterally, it goes 一二三四五六七八九十。。。 But zero is 零, i mean, so simple numbers begin with a so complex number! \(◎o◎)/

April 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zara376408

I'm learning soo much Thanks doulingo

June 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zara376408

The numbers are tricky to

June 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Anyone knows how this character is made? What are the roots and their meanings?

December 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AWSMDEWD

Is it possible to write this in Mandarin as just the number 0, like that? This goes for other numbers too (1, 2, 3...)

December 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FonzieSquirrel

Coincidentally a completely different character than the Japanese "borrowed"

July 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muzamalsal

ling mean zero how i foucus?

September 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverQuee677478

Lian yu in english is purgatory.

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmetHamam3

Lin

November 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/weirdnerdykid123

huh?

November 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pickapou

Y

December 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cheddar500

You didn't tell me this meant zero yet...

January 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sonic968462

It said I typed in English, but I typed the Chinese symbol

January 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dani.dyba

Hi

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zara376408

Hi

June 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dani.dyba

Hi

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dani.dyba

Alguem br?

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dani.dyba

Alguem br

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rhinotheking64

i got it now

February 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UjjwalAndK

All are l'ing i am onley first

February 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SushiWoshi

In this question it said i had typed in english and not chinese

March 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karuna8063

If you did type in Chinese, then you need to report it as an error. OR if the question asked you to type in English but you got that message, then also report it as an error.

March 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ieatbeans1

Reeee

March 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GreenNadin

Stop being ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ annoying

March 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Preston563690

How was I supposed to know

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Preston563690

I learned this easily

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean725768

I thought you could also put 0 and they would understand

April 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karuna8063

Read the discussion and you will see other options.

April 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MBH3691

How do you write Chinese characters on a phone?

May 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zara376408

You can't

June 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KMAC783

my dad now's some chase

May 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beyaruni

I never want to write it again omg what a fkin letter xDD

May 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joshua420931

Ye O boi !

June 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joshua420931

Ye o boi = eBay

June 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G0n12

This mean zero or nothing

June 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicolinaA1

It genuinely annoys me that when first presented with something completely new with zero foundation to go off, I have to guess what word or number it should be. Later on it's a good tactic to test if you understand how the language you are learning is built but when completely new it's freaking annoying because I'm just guessing not actually learning anything. Language isn't a gambling thing.

June 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stupedfatidiot

How would you write lets say 581 in chineese? you use all the symbols? Five hundred Eight ten????? all of the symbols you use? can somebody tell me?

July 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celina592592

I like the turtle sound..

July 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben611106

I accidentally typed 9 (next to the 0) an get it right

August 7, 2019
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