"Call me Ming Zhang."

Translation:叫我张明。

1 year ago

121 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ArundeepRa
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Why does Zhang ( 张 ) coming first in the sentence . Instead it should be 明 张 ( Ming Zhang ) not the reverse Zhang Ming ( 张 明 ) as given here. Can someone explain ?? Thanks in advance.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ululare
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the order of family name and first name differs in chinese from English. If you are called Tyrion Lannister, you'd say "jiào wo Lannister Tyrion"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LazyEinstein
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This is a good explanation. Beware when answering. Ensure you are putting the name in the correct order for the target language of the answer. Family name then first for Mandarin and First then last in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
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Or, less confusingly, "given name" instead of "first name".

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fleuriefirst1

but in the practices before this one we had tgo do in the other order

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
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Yep the course is in beta and unfinished and full of inconsistencies, not just in the order of names. It will keep changing until they get it right.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RW8472
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Then the English question is wrong (it should have the names reversed)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/uroshu
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Not really, because in English the right order is FIRST NAME + LAST NAME, but in Chinese, it's the other way around (LAST NAME + FIRST NAME). The way you suggest would be wrong from the English point of view. But, I understand it was a bit misleading and I made the same mistake because I didn't know that the order was different in Chinese and that we have to reverse it. Now we know, right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
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It's best to avoid "first name" and "last name" in this context. Use "given name" and "surname" instead.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stanley659618

Yes, but how does one know Ming isn't the first name vs the last. Same for Zhang.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
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Because of how common they are. The same way we know "Mike" is a given name and "Smith" a surname in English.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOrlando3
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Except that Zhang can be a given name in Chinese. Ming (as in the Ming dynasty) can also be a surname.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cpaylor2010
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Does it matter if its Jiao Wo or Wo Jiao? Is one more formal?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ekrem_G
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Jiao wo ... = call me .. Wo jiao ... = I am called ...

Both forms are correct.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/starrylee2

Jiao wo means Call me Wo jiao means I call .....

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karuna8063

I would like to understand this too. I was correct for Wo jiao, but at the top it says Jiao wo. Is there a difference?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ManalMabrook

yes...wo jiao is i call (myself) and jiao wo means call me...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grosseryga

I don't get it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/starrylee2

Jiao wo = Call me Wo jiao = I call .....

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grosseryga

No

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quickabi1
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I'd say that that makes perfect sense, but when translating the same sentences to English it offers both the last name first and the first name first as acceptable answers. I wonder why it's different in this one?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pahichilla

Zhang (张) is a common surname in China. In Chinese pronunciation and writing, the surname goes first, followed by the birth name. When translated in English-speaking countries, it is arranged as first (birth) name, then the surname.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOrlando3
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Except not the way this sentence is structured. If you translate 叫我张明 to English, you would still say "Call me Zhang Ming" because what you want the person to call you is the same. For example, speaking to a foreigner in China, you wouldn't change your name around for them, you'd still want them to call you by your surname first. The fact that in a western country, the name order would be changed to Ming Zhang doesn't matter here.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pbhj9
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Agreed. If a Chinese speaker asks my name and I say "Bob Jones" I wouldn't expect them to then call me "Jones Bob".

If I ask a Chinese speaker (in Chinese) "what should I call you" and they say "Zhang Ming", would they expect me to call them "Ming Zhang" when speaking English?

The whole idea of translating names seems contradictory.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CheDeBarna

Exactly this. Even grammatically speaking, the direct object of 叫我 is an immutable expression, you can't just shuffle around it's components.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mandarinco1

I think it is because it is easier to translate 'Ming Zhang' instead of 'Zhang Ming'.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Unnie19
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In Chinese the surname always come first before the given name. As you progressively get closer to the person you'd drop the surname and call them by the given name, kind like honorifics I guess. Chinese is just a complicated mess in general ;-;

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CvonD1
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In Chinese, the last name is written ahead of the given name. On Duolingo, you're going to lose that battle, because the question is being asked in English: we are supposed to write it in Chinese and therefore swap the order of the two words. I wrote it twice the same way today, got one fail by using their little cards, and one pass when I typed exactly the same thing but using pinyin/simplified on my keyboard. I am surprised that, with the number of upvotes you received, no one had time to explain it. At least, Duolingo should have an explanation flag somewhere. But... it's Duolingo Chinese, so, no, no explanations... Check Pandanese to learn radicals at pandanese.com, or Ninchanese for very solid learning!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amadigeoff

In chinese the surname comes first then the other name

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ILOVETEDDY1

Yea

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/5REe3

I agree,why are the words switch?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CheDeBarna

They don't. The answer is wrong. It could be a possible answer if the sentence was 我叫, "My name is". Then you could possible say that you can flip the surname and name if you are 100% which is which. But the sentence doesn't say that, it says "Call me" so and so. So no switching. It's just wrong and they need to fix it.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itsjernerthern

Because in Chinese, the formal way to say a name is Last name, then first name.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOrlando3
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It's not formal. It's always unless you're close to the person and just use their given name.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mohan67679

Same here

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/asddasqwerty123

Same for me

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeyarraEdw

In Chinese, it's said in reverse.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kyle808768

Also inconsistent between translations, some require reversal of name order while other exercises on here don't. I don't believe changing name order is appropriate in a Chinese to English context. I've yet to meet a native speaker who would change the order of their name just because they are speaking to a foreigner. Please address this duolingo!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LazyEinstein
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Please report this. It is a noted issue that needs to be addressed. Reporting will put it to the top of the list.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOrlando3
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I don't change my name order when I speak Chinese unless I'm using my Chinese name, which is surname first then given name.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RW8472
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Agreed! This is what's tripping me up to.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aelfwyne

it should take either direction. As far as tge excuse that "english does it backwards", i know many Chinese and many if them refuse to reverse their name even when working in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FOU56Woj

There are two issues, 1) Chinese name order and 2) how to translate from English to Chinese. Yes Chinese family-names are usually said first. But if someone tells us in English: "Call me Ming Zhang" we should believe that is what they want to be called, and translate into Chinese with that same name order. Maybe in another context (like translating a novel) we'd do it differently and reverse family name and given name. Meanwhile this phrase is out of context and does not tell us which name is which, so it is best to read it as this person is really called "Ming Zhang" and leave it at that.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leillia
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If they want me to call them Ming Zhang then I will call them Ming Zhang and not Zhang Ming. How am I supposed to even know which one is the surname??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
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The same way you know "eat" is a verb and "car" is a noun. You learn them.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOrlando3
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Both of those names can be given names and surnames, so it is not possible to do more than guess in this case.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RW8472
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Again with this name stuff? And it's not consistent. Duolingo needs to address this.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Unknown569831

Chinese first names normally follow the two character convention. However, there are some with one character names like Ming (明). I believe the confusion happens due to many Chinese individuals having two characters as their first name and we do not reverse said two character first name.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sa967St
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I don't think Duo showed the tones for Ming Zhang. Am I correct in saying it's first tone then second tone (zhāng míng)?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KX3.
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Yes.

Actually, if you're not sure of the pronunciation or meaning, just copy and and google search it using the formula "(word)+意义". You're welcome to copy that too.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nuree.Lc

And again with the reverse thing !

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Funkbelly

I do see the logic of what Duolingo is going for here, but this is more confusing than anything. We say "Mao Zedong" and not "Zedong Mao", after all.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oskar724417

I agree I failed only on that

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DivideHanBy3

To get this straight, in English, we call each other by first then last. In China, however, we say the last name then first. It's more formal that way, and also more respectful. people don't usually single you out as an outsider if you can get it straight. (I'm Asian. Just by the picture, you can tell.) It should be accepted either way, though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ykkyca

I agree with all of you BUT both Ming and Zhang can be last names and names. There isn't a way to tell.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carachew

A Chinese speaker would not normally introduce their Chinese name with First name + Last name (i.e. Ming Zhang) even when translated to English.

We would introduce ourselves with Last name + First name (i.e. Zhang Ming) first; then we would further explain that Zhang is the Last name & Ming is the First name.

It should not be automatically assumed under the English context & formation of names.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leillia
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I still find it kind of funny that they say "Call me Zhang Ming" so we're supposed to say 'okay' and then do the exact opposite of that. I mean, I know the surname comes first in Chinese but if they are literally telling us to call them something then maybe we should call them that lol. I just find it odd.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
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The translating is an exercise, it's not part of the conversation we're having with him.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/apagenia
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This is an annoying trick question. Very confusing and the logic does not seem to be valid. 张明 is Zhang Ming in English and not Ming Zhang just as 毛泽东 is Mao Zedong and not Zedong Mao. You never see Zedong Mao in English, nor Jinping Xi etc etc. I know it has been said many times, but figured adding another voice to this can't hurt.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
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Of course you never see Chan Jackie or Li Jet in English either.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KX3.
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That's because those are "Christian" or "English" names so they come first before the "Chinese" names, e.g. Amy Lee (family name) Xiu Hui (given names).

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/apagenia
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Yeah. Or Lee Bruce. Because that's not their names.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOrlando3
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It is in certain contexts. For example, a Chinese student who studies in America will be called by their first name only and when teachers see rosters and things or call names out loud, they will use given name then surname. However, in terms of this sentence - yeah, no.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CameronSne5

The problem is the 'given name comes first' rule in English is usually only applicable to westerners. In English we often refer to Chinese people surname first in respect of their culture. Also, I know 张 is a common surname but it does on occasion appear as a given name, doesn't it? It's not all kosher, this question.

It's also unnecessary. The teaching of which one is first name and last name is already being done in other questions with the symbols 姓 and 名.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dukala

So if I'm getting this right, 叫我张明 is "call me ming zhang" and 我叫张明 is "i'm called ming zhang". Is that correct?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOrlando3
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Almost - you just (like Duolingo) have the names backward. What you wrote was "Call me Zhang Ming" and "I am called Zhang Ming." (surname then given name)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CheDeBarna

The answer is wrong, regardless of whatever contrived explanations smartasses want to come up with to look like they are very clever. Full stop. It's infuriating. Just fix it.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/07196

God ❤❤❤❤❤❤ this name order always confuses me. As long as you learn Chinese I think you should follow Chinese rule. If it says Ming Zhang in Chinese learning course then please, he is Ming Zhang and no one else.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DKKvv1

Tripped out.I am chinese and this is absolutely wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Meizhen10

THAT'S WHAT I SAY AS WELL. JUST BECAUSE WESTERNERS REVERSE THEIR NAMES IS NO REASON TO ASSUME THAT EVERYONE'S "CORRECT" NAMES ARE REVERSED AS WELL. That kind of cultural bias pisses me off!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esmeralda224399

Me too

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nehrmann84
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Recommendation to DuoLingo team: Preserve traditional name order--i.e. xìng (surname) followed by míng (personal name). Particularly when using Mandarin Chinese, it is already the standard for most English-speaking media (ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_name#Chinese_names_in_English ). Reversing just causes confusion. Particularly because (I imagine) most DuoLingo learners don't yet have enough cultural familiarity to distinguish which names are typically personal versus familial.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Meizhen10

Wrong! He could have been speaking with a native Chinese - so that he WOULD say Call me Zhang Ming. WHY WOULD YOU TRANSLATE A CHINESE SPEAKER TO HAVE WESTERN CULTURAL PREDILECTIONS TO REVERSE THE NAMES. HE IS SPEAKING C H I N E S E.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rich992347

Why do they have me translating words they haven't shown me yet? How am i supposed to know what it means the very first time I see it? Please teach me the word first!!!!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rich992347

Teach me a word before you ask me to translate it

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOrlando3
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It is unclear whether the English sentence is literally transliterating the name (what the person should be called) or using English naming structure (given name then surname). It is the latter, but you have no way of knowing that when completing the question.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tre84062

I have put, 叫我明张 and got it wrong. Do you have to put the surname first? Thank you

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esmeralda224399

Ok that ❤❤❤❤ is ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ unfair

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talkpissin
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am i to understand that /i am ming zhang/, /i am called ming zhang/, and /call me ming zhang/ are all literally equivalent under translation?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOrlando3
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no, though the meaning is the same, mostly. 我是张明 - I am Zhang Ming. 我叫张明 - I am called Zhang Ming. 叫我张明 - Call me Zhang Ming. (this meaning is different - it's still giving the name, but it's an imperative sentence rather than a declarative sentence, though it would look more like a command if written 叫我张明吧)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Asahel819796

Why does jiao come first?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOrlando3
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It's a command. You could also say 你叫我张明 or 你可以叫我张明, but the "you" is unnecessary unless you're standing in front of several people and only telling one of them, specifically, that they can or should call you by that name.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielDaNi411942

This is confusing. First name last name is switched

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DrKrogh
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Okay, from what I've gathered from this discussion. The last two signs are reversed because that last names comes first in chinese. But it doesn't say that anywhere! You just naturally have to know this which is idiotic

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jealeah

I put the right tansition but i got it wrong i under stand this but name is the hardest out of all i mean i have good history with knowing chinese and i dont just get why i got that wrong and it flustates me.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdwalker13

Jesus, this is confusing, no Chinese person in the history of time would say call me ming zhang but then their name is Zhang ming.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
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Maybe only Chinese naturalized in English-speaking countries but who kept their Chinese name. Such as the Chinese Indonesian-born Singaporean and Australian radio presenter Lee Lin Chin (陳麗玲). But I guess from the sounds of it here that it's too rare for it to belong in this course.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Lin_Chin

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewPark192222

Its backwards

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Bii_
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I Have learned and i can't understand anything. I am so noob! Dude!!!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esmeralda224399

Ok that ❤❤❤❤ is ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ unfair

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esmeralda224399

Ikr

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rosssetastone

this is too hard

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crisp_by_Yosi

That is exactly what I've typed.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sophie137757

I cant remember which name is the surname and which is the first name

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
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Zhang is a super common Chinese surname, like Smith or Brown or Jones in English.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheBillyBobjoe

To chinese culture, you put the last name first. That what I remember at least.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/charlotte754129

Don't understand Chinese

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/willyktt

The answer is incorrect. it should be 明 张 ( Ming Zhang ) not the reverse Zhang Ming ( 张 明 )

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RisaKoizum5

Why in english : Ming Zhang or Zhang Ming, all OK, but in chinese, we only use Zhang Ming????

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOrlando3
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Because in Chinese you never call someone by their given name and then their surname. It's always surname first then given name unless you are very familiar with someone, in which case you can just use their given name.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ben672558

The audio and the characters don't seem to match. The audio says Ming Zhang, the characters say Zhang Ming. (yes, I know the Chinese order is last name first)

When reading and transcribing Chinese, is it customary to reverse the names every time? For example, If "Peter Parker" was Chinese and someone said "Peter Parker takes photos of Spiderman". Would we have to write "Parker Peter takes photos of Spiderman" ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOrlando3
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For transliterated names, no. Chinese newspapers and things use transliterations with given name then surname naming order. Westerners are usually called by however they introduce themselves. The only time westerners are really called by surname then given name is by people who only speak Chinese and don't know that we do it differently. (yes, I've fallen in to the Chinese trap of calling everyone who isn't Chinese a westerner.)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evangeline973340

What is the symbol for call ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
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11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/uuaynr

I think these modules should give the option of listening to the sentence (regardless of whether one is correct or wrong) after submitting an answer. It would also be good if we could listen to the character sounds simply by hovering the mouse over them rather than only hearing them when left-clicking to put them into the sentence line.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Piktoll
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This is just stupid. We don't swap names for Chinese

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarStars_18

How do you do the Chinese period?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOrlando3
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Type a period while using a Chinese keyboard.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DorisAdoma

I think i type the right word since it gives me the sound of the character but it keeps on telling me that im using the wrong words. ops.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenzythebi

I love this guys .

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grosseryga

Get married

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grosseryga

So hard to saying it in Chinese

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magickit

It can't be the other way around? I answered it with the ming Zhang like ming Zhang not Zhang ming...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LillyChhim

This is confuseing

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LillyChhim

I really dont get it like this is confusing pls help me

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xxgrxcexx

UMMMMM UNCORRECT

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1CandyCain

Why are we not learning these....especially before testing. Its a guessing game.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/umairsyed1

I am edgy

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hiromi912402

Chang Ming should be correct answer. I think it's wong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOrlando3
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Chang is Wade-Giles transliteration, which isn't used in the mainland or by most western scholars anymore. You'll really only see it in Taiwan, I think. It's Zhang.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/travis367476

this is how u do the chiness pirod .

1 year ago
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