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"June, 2013"

Translation:二〇一三年六月

November 16, 2017

61 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TreeReader

does the year always have to come first?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosephMauc

Yes, opposite of Europe, which is Day/month/Year, China uses Year/Month/Day America is just weird with month/day/year


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iwilleatyouall

For one thing, it means if the dates get sorted by a computer, it will put them in the correct order, even with a normal sort algorithm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CupofTuesday

Yeah Asia mostly does YYYYMMDD not DDMMYYYY or MMDDYYY


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulineWan8

In Thailand its DDMMYYYY


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aymusbond

In India it is DDMMYYYY


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

It is always biggest unit to smallest: year, month, day, day of week, part of day (morning/afternoon/evening), hour, minute


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pete9320

Yeah - that's what I was told in class.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yoruji

Yes, dates and times are from large to small (year, month, day)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveLommen

Yes. For dates, it is year, month, day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

It's biggest unit to smallest in China, both with dates/times and with names.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeyJo0

〇 is often used instead of 零, because the latter is just hell to write down constantly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JOrlando3

〇 is really only used in years like this or in a string of numbers. Otherwise, Kyle is right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Znc7k61r

No, 〇 is the only correct form. It is not recommended to mix 〇一二三四五六七八九 and 零壹贰叁肆伍陆柒捌玖. These are two sets of numbers and shouldn't be used together in modern standard Chinese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sahar-rabayev

I was wondering the same thing, maybe the word you wrote is "absolute zero" and the one that looks like an "o" is used for zeros as part of a number??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvgenFirst

How can I type this "circle" sign on the chinese keyboard?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

The circle is also pronounced líng. Type "ling" into a pinyin input system and it will be an option, although you may have to scroll a bit to get to it. The lack of audio must be a Duo mistake. There are actually several "lack of audio" mistakes throughout the course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/s_a_r_i_t_a

In X on Linux, compose u25ef or control-shift-u u25ef followed by a space gives ◯, though I'm not sure that is the correct character because I just switched to mouse click input for this problem. (U+25EF is the unicode.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JOrlando3

〇 is ling. On my keyboard, it came up in the fourth row down under number 4.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rhnhh

i would also like to know, have some lingots


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hei1long2

Why is 二零十三年,六月。wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AussieCrisp

Because the convention for reading years is reading each number individually followed by 年. Just as our convention (GENERALLY speaking) is to group our years in their tens - nineteen fifty-six for 1956; twenty thirteen for 2013. Hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuardianArcana

When you are talking about identifying numbers, like the date, a phone number, or an address, you list the numbers as is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JOrlando3

They don't say two zero thirteen for years (and neither do we in English). They always just list each digit - two zero one three for 2013 (twenty thirteen in English).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/terroristpeanut

Also because in modern Chinese we dont use 零 but 〇


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pete9320

Would that 0 really be used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DestinationVoid

I reallt wonder how comon it is. I've asked a 北京 person once and they said they've never seen it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JOrlando3

I've never seen it, but I checked the dictionary and it was there. Years are usually just written in Arabic numerals, but I don't know about in classical Chinese literature or something like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasKjr4

Not according to Chinese I've spoken with. No pronounciation makes for confusion. Would like an explanation from somebody more knowing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosephMauc

It should be líng, 零, which is zero


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom310636

The circle is always used in dates


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jing635360

Yes. For example, 二百三 means two hundred thirty, not two hundred three.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EduardoMar38021

What is the purpose of the 0


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TreeReader

for the zero in 2013


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the1best

to hold in the hundred's place. Probably.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShenShuLan

〇 is not pronounced in dates leading to confusion. Seesm to be a bug


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skcheng

No audio when selecting O


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MooN434

六月二O一三年 is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hei1long2

2013年,六月?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JOrlando3

except that they want 2013 in Chinese characters not Arabic numerals.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Znc7k61r

No comma allowed in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LorenzoCas449023

why the hell is this thing not accepting netiher 0 nor O as a zero when typing the chinese date...fix this bs


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JOrlando3

It's not a zero or an "o". It's a Chinese character.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iwilleatyouall

If it's not actually possible to type 〇 through the normal Mandarin typing methods, you should not penalise writing 零. Come on, Duolingo, do your job!


[deactivated user]

    What is 2020 called? 二〇二〇年?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yuxuan788907

    The zero is supposed to be 零 not whatever circle thingy that is. Im Chinese and im doing this n this is actually disappointing to see. People are being thought wrongly without knowing.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GavinRees5

    why wasnt 2013年六月 accepted?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GavinRees5

    I can't find the "ling" symbol on my Chinese keyboard pissing me the hell off


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dear314938

    Why didn't it accept 二零十三年六月 for June 2013?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meika582854

    The natural way to spell this is “2013年 6”。


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/invinculis

    What do you mean by "natural"? That would be arabic numerals.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vencatom

    no Chinese will write zero like 0!!! Sorry but it is wrong everywhere...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Locutus69

    WTF??? What was the $ amount Duolingo swallowed to affect the adaptation of "0" ? And as a silent/stealth character at that?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the1best

    They should accept "六月二〇一三年"!!!!!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ImJeongSeong

    No, months in Chinese and Asian calendars never go before year. It's always Year, Month, Day. If they accepted this answer, then you would not be learning the correct grammar.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RohanSoni8

    It is year first, then month, then day of the month.

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