1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Korean
  4. >
  5. "마신 물"

"마신 "

Translation:Water that was drunk

November 16, 2017

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raemation

Is this past tense? Could we also say 마시는 물? Whenever I review this I keep writing "drinking water" on my first guess


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/notjustmarko

adding ~는 makes it present tense. ~(으)ㄴ is past and (으)ㄹ makes it future.

마시는 물 - drinking water 마신 물 - water that was drunk 마실 물 - water that will be drunk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nleconte

Often in similar grammar patterns, 는 relates to present tense, ㄴ to past tense and 을 to future tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wintertriangles

Yes it's past tense. 마시는 물 is water that you are drinking now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaneanKim

Yes 마신 물 is past tense!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TikaShier

I put 'drunken water' like that even makes sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mm
  • 777

What you mean is drunk water, as opposed to drunken water which is water that has had too much alcohol...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TikaShier

I'm looking at this in 2019...Lel so embarassed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BUis2

마신 물 means the water that was drunk. 마시는 물 means the water is drinkable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

I'm getting 마실 수있는 물 for water that is drinkable . . .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

식수 = drinking/potable water

비 식수 = non potable water


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mcnbns

Go home, water


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikavlas

This is more of an english question, but why is it drunk and not drank? Are both drank and drunk acceptable past tenses for drink?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TikaShier

ok, so if you tried looking at this in an "intelligent" way, you would notice you can use both drank and drunk for the sentence: "I drank water." It would also be correct if you replaced drank with drunk in the sentence: "I drunk water."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

Drunk is a participle like drinking, and so needs a verb after a subject. You can't say "I drunk water" any more than you can say "I drinking water". It's "I've/'d drunk water" and "I am/was drinking water" and so on. A lot of Americans I've encountered think drunk means you've had too much alcohol likely because it has a separate dictionary entry saying so. Drunk, though, is also the past participle listed under the verb drink ...

I'm getting (술)취한 for (dizzy/having trouble walking) drunk/drunken, 음주 for drunk as in drunk driving meaning having drunk alcohol (술 마셨다), 취하게 한 (like had been got drunk?) for inebriated, under-the-influence-of-alcohol gets 알코올(/술)의 영향(을 받아)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mcnbns

"Drunk" is the past participle. ("I have drunk some juice.") "Drank" is the simple past. ("I drank some juice.")

The past participle is what you use to make a verb into an adjective. ("He chose poorly" vs. "He is the chosen one." Another example: "They broke the game." vs. "The game is broken.")

We don't think about it because lots of times the past participle and simple past form of a verb are identical. Above, I used examples that aren't, but: "I finished my homework" vs. "I have finished my homework" vs. "Finished assignments should be handed in tomorrow." "Finished" looks identical in both cases but isn't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

Yes. Many people still used "drank" as past participle to avoid the confusion between drunk and drunken (intoxicated).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldMath4

"Water drunk" is water that was drunk, no matter what DL says about it. "Water drunk is water unwasted." But actually, 마신 물 does not mean "Water that was drunk" in the passive, it means water someone (you? I?) drank.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Official_Peela

can't you just say "water was drunk?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

Water was drunk = 물이 마셔졌다 (<-- past tense of the passive verb 마셔지다, to be drunk)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baelasi

Water that drank too much!

Learn Korean in just 5 minutes a day. For free.