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"我们在哪个站下车?"

Translation:At which stop do we get off?

November 17, 2017

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jocke190028

'At which station do we get off'...shouldnt it be accepted? I know they are mentioning the vehicle in the sentence, but still....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwinWisse

exactly, many of the english sentences are just awkward.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiKenun

The course is still beta (2017-11-20). Just report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jonah217779

'At which' is grammatically correct, therefore should be correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phillbo

Clearly you've understood the Chinese just fine. I think it sounds a bit unnatural in English having the "at" at the start of the sentence rather than the end, but I agree I think it's a valid answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveLommen

Er... to me it sounds awkward to have the "at" at the end of the sentence rather than at the start!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IceAly

It's less colloquial, but most people are taught not to end sentences in prepositions, so Jocke190028's answer is grammatically correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dave168907

That is one thing up with which I will not put.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElijahKFoster

At which point does this sentence stop sounding natural to you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patcyw

it should be accepted!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexZhang815693

GUINNESS WORLD RECORD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilyAlcee

I think it's because that's an unnatural way to say it. You wouldn't say that in English, this app translates to natural English sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kcmurphy

Both are perfectly natural and grammatically correct ways of saying it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveLommen

That is actually better English than the model answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveLommen

That is better than the model answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pinicius_olipeix

That is an English error. You can't finish sentences with "off". I use a "Two and a Half Men" episode to remember this. Jake's teacher says something like "You don't flip people off, you flip off people"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TydalM.

This is a Chinese, not an English course. But it seems like a lot of people think it is (especially native English speakers).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Umbravena

I believe "What station are we getting off at?" should also be accepted. It means the same thing and as a native Mandarin speaker, this is what I would translate it into.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WMDistraction

I translated this as "Where do we get off?" since that is exactly how I'd ask that on a bus or metro...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew-Lin

我們在哪個站下車?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryRynsbu

I agree this is the way you'd really say it in English: "What stop (station) do we get off at?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaiXi_Tracy

I put "at" at the beginning of the sentence as well . It does sound at bit awkward but I was always taught never to end a sentence with a preposition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Winston298006

站 means both "station" and "stop," i.e., "bus stop."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/codewritertom

Chinese-English / English-Chinese translation is not as precise as French to English, or English to Spanish. Add in Duolingo's inherent weirdness, and there will be issues. Tough it out as best as you can.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pogosticksteve

Whoever says you cant end a sentence with a preposition is full of it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bear250381

"At which stop do we alight?" was marked as incorrect, although it is correct. One alights trains and buses in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouisePerd1

"Station" should be accepted as the type of vehicle is not mentioned.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Master719482

finally, a question with a correctly structured English answer.. LMAO


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mohamed710700

The voice is very bad


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinkOwO

In my head i translated it to "Do we get off at that stop?" Is it correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/codewritertom

"At which station do we get off?" is marked as wrong. The owl must have stumbled and smacked its poor head on the pavement this morning....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m.edrez

"Which station do we alight at" should also be accepted!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hobbszzz

Can we say disembark instead of get off?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

I would use disembark for a ship and maybe a plane, but not a bus. I suppose it's technically fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephanusG1

I think (dis)embark is only for ships and planes, but you could say 'alight'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelHe8

Ya some are REALLY awkward.❓❓❓


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ola296508

Stop should be accepted aswell as station


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celticfiddleguy

"Stop" was accepted for me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TonyLouis

Why is 站 pronounced differently when read independently?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

You picked on the clearest one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iphisucks

i keep confusing english prepositions so i get sentences like this wrong :'''''(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexanderNg

"Which bus stop do we alight?" Is wrong? Hmmm...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chetlin

You are missing "at".

Asian transit systems do like using "alight" in their English announcements from my experience :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elaine564

"We get off at which station?" sounds formal and stiff, but ending a sentence in a preposition is like fingernails on a chalkboard!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ninj4

The correct word for "get off" is to alight.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dave168907

Dismount, disembark?

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