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  5. "我有时差,现在很累。"

"我有时差,现在很累。"

Translation:I have jet lag, I am tired now.

November 17, 2017

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jpearse

"I'm jet lagged and am now very tired." should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ant.H

Is it correct with "very"? I tought that 我很累 just means "I'm tired".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hedwigechouette

"i've got jet lag. I'm very tired now" was rejected but I think it's ok. The correct solution on the exercise under my answer was given as "I've a jet lag" with "a" underlined. This is wrong/unnatural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karoliina765050

I got 'I've jet lag' as correction to 'I'm jet-lagged' and that's even worse. I could probably swallow 'I have a jet lag', but 'I've jet lag' is just awful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnsark

Please report it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karoliina765050

The problem with this course is that we keep reporting problems and nothing happens. The phrase 'I am jet-lagged' has been reported countless times for 7 months and still nobody has fixed it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hq4

时差 has the wrong tone in the prompt.

差 = tone 4, but in 时差, 差 = tone 1.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wgss.ca

"I have jet lag, now I am tired" should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gabchan

I have jet lag, i am now tired!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamtintraders

Their suggested answer: "I've jet lag..." I defy any native english speaker to come up with that one! And "SO I am tired now"... In the Chinese I've been learning 现在很累 is simply "I am tired now". The causal effect of the jetlag on their jetlag might be implied but it's not stated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ronios

The male voice pronounces 差 like "chuā".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nanase4367

"I have jet lag, I am now tired." should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BigFather3

"i have jet lag, permanently." should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devikirei

有 does mean "have" but "I have jet lag" sounds odd to English speakers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julestheman

很 不是 very 嗎?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/varigby

Tired/very tired 都可以


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TofutheBold

It can also function like 是but for noun+adj instead of noun+noun in a simple sentence.

For example, He is a student 他是學生

He is tall 他很高

But if you want to emphasize his height, you can say

He is very tall 他非常高


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

Yes it is. Very is used even when it is not quite so. In fact, we must use it here in this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rkirsling

Rarely does it actually mean "very". It's mostly just part of the grammar of adjectives.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wgss.ca

No it does mean very but not that stong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dTanMan

I actually encounter 很 as "very" more often than otherwise. If i needed to say "i'm tired" i'd say 我累了 and not 我很累.

I'm guessing that location probably has a lot to do with this nuance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

Location: Duolingoverse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/film4thefu

It is used a lot where we wouldn't use 'very' in English, almost as we'd use the verb 'to be' with an adjective


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

很 is also a filler word because the sentence would not be grammatically correct without an adverb there. 很 literally means "very," but it is also the generic filler adverb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7qRV2

Time lag should be excepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karoliina765050

Never heard the phrase 'time lag'... nor the word 'excepted'.

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