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  5. "不客气!"

"不客气!"

Translation:You are welcome!

November 17, 2017

76 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barnes_Crystal

"You're welcome" is not a typo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

The reason "you're welcome" is counted as a typo is that Duolingo removes punctuation before it assesses answers, and it counts the apostrophe at the beginning and end of words (but not in the middle) as punctuation. Since the word bank presents " 're" as its own word, Duolingo interprets it as "re" without an apostrophe, but then compares it to the sentence in its database, and decides "Oh wait, where's the apostrophe!" It's nothing our Chinese contributors can do anything about. It's an error in the system.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spydrouge

Is it possible for you/us/anyone to leave a bug report somewhere for Duolingo engineers to eventually tackle?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

Unfortunately no, not that I know of. This is an issue not unique to this course, although it may cause more problems here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

The most useful reply. Have a Lingot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Igor242724

They can just accept youre as a correct answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Natalia983613

Wait, so 不客气 means you are welcome of "hey, yes, you are welcome here" or like "hey, thank you"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamOoi85

It means you are welcome (after someone have thanked you)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wadafik

How about "no problem"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellis930361

Yes, it is used for that also.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cyberiagirl

Oh good, that was what I said and I was surprised when it was marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ghiblilover149

It is now accepted, July 2020 :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul834534

Sometimes you can also hear people saying 没事 mei2shi4


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul834534

没关系 mei2guan1xi


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AuxYo

No no problem is a diferent thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClassiDuo

Out of context, this could also be "not polite!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aldebran

Literally: “don't be (so) polite”. And it's also use like ''no, thanks''.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ethereal_dream

Thanks for literal translation, the duo translation of characters didn't make sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikeyjkk

If you are using Android you should install Pleco and enable the screen reader service. It made much more sense when i realised 客气 together form a different meaning to their individual characters.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackElfrink

Someone in another topic explained it as "no need for formalities". That helps me understand why "not polite" is the literal translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbMacK

Out of context it can also be 'no guest air' ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

That is kinda 不用客气, used to tell people not to be so formal e.g. when they visit your home, like "make yourselves at home".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhL7jn1gj98

不客气 = Not guest air ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

Literally by character 不=no, 客=guest, 气=air/ energy 客气=Polite. This is a compound word (the "energy of guests", or the way guests act, is politeness) 不客气 = You're welcome (someone is thanking you, ie being polite and formal, and you are saying literally, "don't be polite", meaning "you don't need to thank me/you don't need to be formal about this/relax". This is similar to the origin of our own English phrase "you're welcome." Someone is thanking you, and the appropriate response is "You're welcome," short for "You are welcome (to the thing you're thanking me for.)" The root meaning of both the Chinese and English versions is essentially saying "oh you don't need to thank me."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

Best explanation :> Seriously, someone should go through all those threads, gather all such useful information and put in one place, because all those seeds of wisdom are getting lost in the chaff.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PardeepSingh08

If you will translate word to word it will slow down your language learning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xandy1908

This could also mean "no worries" or "don't worry about it"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michisjourdi

They marked me wrong for putting "no worries"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobyBartels

They marked me correct for that now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DraganaIgn

I live in China and for "xie xie" I always get answer "bu yong xie" Never heard about this form of "you are welcome" I'm confused now...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

Both are fine, 不用谢 or 不用 is colloquial. It is in line with the belief that one must be humble (谦虚, qian1 xu1). Some other examples are when someone compliments you, you, for example, can say: 哪里哪里 or 夸奖了 (kua jiang le).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristianG680402

"You're Welcome!" is not a typo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SooperMikey

You're is not a typo for you are


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RohanSoni8

It accepted my "No worries".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stilltati

It told me that the answer "You're welcome" was correct but that I had a typo and it should have been "You are" instead of "you're". Not a big deal but something to consider changing to be correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spydrouge

Why on earth do you give me access to " 're " and then tell me "You're welcome" has a typo and should be changed to "You are welcome?"

Literally this means "No politeness!" or "Don't be so polite." It's a Chinese expression and I understand why you have to teach it, and that it's hard to account for all the translations it could possibly have in English but... still, there's a lot of people not using the word bank who'd like to have words with you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

What's a word bank?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanRasm

Little words in blocks you can click on to type them in.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

What blocks? I don't have any blocks. I always just type in all the words myself. Am I missing something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wmir

I only now figured out that you also could type something in.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elnaphtali

Says there's a typo in "You're welcome"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jenia91847

In Russian, this phrase means fart.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BernardoSa426827

In portuguese it is even worse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

In Polish: "Here, have a bun." :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kerry204114

You're is not a typo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rachel829302

"You're welcome" is DEFINITELY not a typo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/px003

These phrases would be a lot easier to learn if the given translations were more literal. How are we supposed to get a feel for the words when the given translations have no connection to the characters it shows.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

Well, perhaps we can self-help as active learners. A quick bit of work with a dictionary suggests maybe “[I’m] not angry with [you] the customer”. Any thoughts?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

Well, considering that the mascot for this website is a PARROT, I wouldn't expect anything more than PARROTING phrases here :g


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

Should have gone to Specsavers!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnSoroka2

No problem should work as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

Actually in British English this could only ever be said “you’re welcome”; I don’t think I’ve ever heard “you are welcome”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

@SimonSprin - when you hear someone who is not holding up placards of the words they speak, how do you make out they said "You're" or "You are"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

In British English when a person is speaking they would normally elide the two words: “you’re”. If they are not elided, for example for emphasis, the speaker has to leave a gap between the two words “you are.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

@Simon - Precisely my point. So the above sentence is correct - "You are welcome". When someone reads it then you'll hear "You're welcome" anyway. :-) Unless if they are emphasizing something in which case you'll hear "You - are - welcome", still maintaining the correctness of the written sentence. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dave168907

Same for American English. "You are welcome" is never heard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Railane834343

Welcome is a correct answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

Maybe on a doormat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gerry980328

It was a typo, not the wrong word. It was a mistyping.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stupedfatidiot

I wrote your welcome why is it wrong. Now i have to practice stuped "greetings 2" to get helth and start this all over.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

“Your” is a possessive pronoun; inappropriate here. So in this case I’m sorry to say that you’re obliged to do your exercise again. With all respect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

You may also consider going through the English course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meek222996

Sometimes when i have put in you're welcome it says the correct way is no worries. I am confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HappyBuu

How about: "Don´t be polite!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lacklustre

You're welcome is just a contraction


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PardeepSingh08

Maybe it's more like no problem than You're welcome


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HomeLS1

Hi, honestly i I don't get it, could some explain me what is a typo and why the answer is "you are welcome"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asahel819796

bu ke qi should be you are not welcome


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eanorel2

I think "Not at all" should be accepted too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cloudsdale4ever

I haven't heard this expression for decades.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/martinswee

Why is "your welcome" not accepted but the correct answer is "you are welcome"!!! Cmon, Duolingo, get some proper QC on your languages. It's hard enough to learn a new language and this app is often teaching you wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nes15789

Error !!! Reporter

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