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  5. "六千零七十块。"

"六千零七十块。"

Translation:6070 yuan.

November 18, 2017

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marchionesselle

Isn't 〇 usually used for 零, or did I mishear my teacher. I don't know why my English text suddenly looks like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew-Lin

A rule of thumb: If the number is just read out, like room numbers, phone numbers, years, etc., both 零 and 〇 are available. If the number represents a real value, like prices, measurements, then you'd better just use 零. This means that 零 is the safest word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ericspanner

Chinese input has "whole" 全形 or "half" 半形, it can be changed by using spacebar + shift.

全形 A B C D 半形ABCD

全形letters can be seen but may not be understood as letters by machines.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jmb0507

块 should be accepted to any kind of currency, not just Yuan. It technically means "piece" and it's usually used to refer to money.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trutheality

Is the 0 necessary? (E.g. seven thousand and sixty in English skips the 0)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve86340

Unfortunately yes, but the 十 isn't, almost how we read a decimal, 一千零七(十) is like saying 1.07 thousand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MalBrood

一千零七 would be 1007.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve86340

For 1007, we say 一千零零七, with 'ling' twice. One of my favourite Chinese songs is called "2002 的第一场雪" by 刀郎 (First Snowfall of 2002), and it's pronounced 二零零二年的。。。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baharem

If zero is necessary for the missing hundreds, is it not necessary for the units too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chetlin

Nope, it's not. As another example 3303 is 三千三百零三 and 3330 is 三千三百三十.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamH77559

It would be more useful if the numbers used at this point in the exercise were different from those used earlier in the exercise, and different from those used in the Tips. Otherwise, it just becomes a question of memory rather than understanding and applying the grammar point. This applies to most Duolingo exercises, which are too repetitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/codewritertom

This is wrong. 六千零七十块 = 6070 KUAI, which is an accepted and very common English translation (at least on the mainland). 6070 YUAN should be 六千零七十元.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salihua

kuai is the equivalent of using "bucks" in English for dollars - If you are using the character 块 then that is the intended word... if you want to have it tranlated as yuan, then use the character 元。Both are legitimate names for the currency. What is maddening is that on some items the database contains both forms. A simple search and replace would make that a standard. Frankly, I think that if you use kuai it should be translated as kuai, and if yuan is used....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wbeeman

What is "ling" (zero) in this construction?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kurzeme

a placeholder meaning there are no "hundreds" in this number


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabricator1

6070 are numerals (used in many languages) six thousand seventy yuan is the correct translation into English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessicaPer136520

Can someone answer the question so many if us have asked? Grammatically speaking, is it necessary to include the place holder zero in the number 6070 in Chinese? Thanks in advance!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick27140

Yes it is necessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chetlin

For an example why, consider the numbers 560 and 506. It turns out that 五百六 is short for 五百六十 and both of these mean 560. So, in order to say 506 instead, you have to put the 零 in there: 五百零六. If you forget it, you get 五百六 which is 560.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salihua

this time KUAI was accepted as an answer. Please make this a consistent rule in the database.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RixMorales

Doesn't 块 literally mean "piece"? So "6070 pieces" should be accepted, right?

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