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  5. "我的公司不让我请假。"

"我的公司不让我请假。"

Translation:My company does not allow me to take leave.

November 18, 2017

53 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/codewritertom

"My company won't let me take time off" is also a correct answer, please add to your database.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JPSeaton

Their lack of flexibility is historic. When we are complaining we should leave dates how about posting to make it clear how historic it is, perhaps shaming them. But it's free. December 18th 2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephanusG1

That's illegal in "socialist" China.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ree413612

Why should it be allowed? Everyone is already united as workers!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amboahaolo

"My company doesn't let me take a day off" should be accepted too (in my opinion).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fatsquirre2

一天假 means a day off, 假/期 is like, vacation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jrspence

My company does not allow me to take time off


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/psqu6jbd

My company won't let me take leave - this translation looks fine to me, please add to your database


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sagadabeans

It needs an indefinite article - "take a leave"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephen_zissou

"take leave" is fine to my ears


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iwilleatyouall

It really does not need an indefinite article because "leave" is an uncountable verb. You don't take a water. You don't take a money. You don't take a leave. You take water, take money, take leave.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xiong949324

No, that would be incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

How about "My company doesn't allow days off"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahDeLaF

I said "My company doesn't allow time off." and when I asked 2 native speakers: "yes that sounds just fine to me." and "acceptable translation" were the verdicts. SCORE


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pjtpjt

"Milton Waddams : [muttering] I could set the building on fire"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fatsquirre2

Why doesn't vacation work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

No, that's a different concept.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

Should accept "won't let me" as well as "doesn't let me".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dave168907

In my dialect of English (western USA), "to take leave" means "to say goodbye and depart". "To take a leave" means "to be absent from military duty". We would never use these expressions for taking time off of work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chingu240798

In my dialect (Indian English), it works fine. It is interesting how quickly languages evolve into dialects.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S.Mo
  • 319

"My work does not allow..." should be accepted. In English, it is quite common to speak of one's work when meaning one's employer or company.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iKaribou

the main english sentence "My work doesn't allow me take take days off." is wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmitSharma664515

I feel qīngjià here is meant to sound as "a request to take a leave"

If we are going with qīngjià as "a holiday", the sentence should be "The company does not accept my request to take a leave"

I might be wrong. Corrections will be appreciated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustusRobi3

"My company won't allow me to take leav" is arguably more idiomatic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wbeeman

There are a dozen ways to properly translate this sentence. Duo rigidly insists on this on very narrow translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TonyBerjaya

Too bad to work in this company.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sora942232

"My company did not allow me to take leave" was rejected. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tonya716399

Cos it's not in past tense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinFulha

Sounds like someone at DuoLingo doesn't like their vacation allowance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MsAWhit

How about "won't let me take a vacation?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/allioops1

Also add "request vacation"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndriesKir

What should be the tone on "jia"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celticfiddleguy

Here it's jià; part of 请假 - to ask for leave/ time off. It can also be jiǎ with several different meanings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dagummace

My office doesn't let me take time off


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Staylaughing

It seems to me that "firm" should also work for "company"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XinqiaoZha1

假 was pronounced jiă instead of jià


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NadavYehon

Take a leave not take leave


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PonyFreckles

Here in the UK we definitely say 'take leave' or 'take some leave' but never 'take a leave'. I'm curious though, as I note that both the commenters saying 'a' is required have South Asian names - is 'take a leave' how it's said in Indian English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeiFeiRalf

"take leave" is completely acceptable in English. Not as common as "take holiday" but still common enough.

There is another meaning, e.g. "taking leave of your senses" which is sometimes shortened to "take leave" but that's nowhere near as common as the work related meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

No. You can say "take a vacation" but you cannot say "take a leave". You need to say just "take leave" if you want to use the word "leave".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephanusG1

Where I come from 'leave' is always uncountable (no indefinite article) unless we say 'a leave of absence'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luca.3v

Exactly, "take leave" means something else


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarenECase

"Take time off" means the same thing as "take leave." Just saying . . .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathan723223

'My company doesn't let me ask for a leave of absence' should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Char716229

what is take leave never heard that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeoChavez17

Why is "my company doesn't allow me to take leaves" unacceptable? Shouldn't it be the same whether you're referring to the singular 'leave' as well as the plural 'leaves'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SoleneGrah

To take leave is not commonly said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/badmode

"My company does not allow me to leave" should be correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sagadabeans

"Go on leave" should be accepted. "Take leave" is unnatural and requires an indefinite article, i.e. "take a leave".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustusRobi3

No, "take leav" (no article) is fine; at least i (who speak American English) find it more idiomatic than "take a leav" (with article). (Brits et al. might find "take a leav" [with article] more idiomatic.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iwilleatyouall

It doesn't require an article because it's an uncountable noun. You don't drink a water. You drink water. You don't take a leave. You take leave.

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