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  5. "如果没有打折,我就不买。"

"如果没有打折,我就不买。"

Translation:If there is no discount, I won't buy it.

November 18, 2017

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

Should also accept "If there's no discount I just wont buy it" as 就 can translate to "just" and this is the natural way I'd say it in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick_Dark

I believe that "If it is not discounted, I will not buy it." should be accepted.

"打折" appears to be a verb like "打電話" (to call) and "打籃球" (to play basketball) that has been converted from a noun with the special verb "打".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fireandice

The "it" isnt necessary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben310267

It is more English though. Let's have the translations be as English as possible, shows the difference between typical English and typical Mandarin nicely


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jimothey

Not necessary but much more natural in my experience


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daltonstout59

In English it absolutely is. Otherwise there is no object in the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

"Buy" doesn't require an object, depending on the sense. Check a dictionary such as Wiktionary here: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/buy#Verb

But I agree it doesn't sound natural to me without "it". It sounds like something mostly non-native English speakers would say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hedwigechouette

"if you don't give me a discount I won't buy it" was rejected, but I think it's fine [even though there is no "me" in the chinese, it's inferred..the effective meaning is the same]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hougineer

"Sale" and "discount" mean the same thing. They should both be acceptable translations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

Not quite. You would have to say "If it's not on sale ..." The phrase "no sale" is something a salesman or negotiator would use and that has a different meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yukcMqS8

Please don't correct my English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Slade366

Doesn't 就 act as "just" in this situation; If there is no discount, I just won't buy it??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobinThor

Why not "I do not buy it"? Why is the future necessary here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George792719

Surely a more accurate version of what the Chinese says is: "If there is no discount, THEN I won't buy it".

That is what the 就 means in the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jorjorswens

if there is no discount i will not buy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beaudanner

TMD! 不打“it" 也错了吗!?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aurokumar

If there is no discount, I won't buy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesBacon7

it would be nice to be able to use them


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/psqu6jbd

How about "If there is no discount, then I won't buy".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoanWallac

I won't buy it is the same as I will not buy it. I am English and normally, as buy is a transitive verb IT is required


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

So.. is "没有" without a preceding pronoun, not a "[ don't have ]" anymore ?

Does it become a "[there is no] discount" for that reason ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

This is an Important remark


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wientmg

The way 有/没有 were taught to me in school, they denote existence of something or more abstractly the occurence of something. 是/不是 is about equivalence, in contrast. So 我是一个老师 is I am (equivalent to) a teacher. And 我有一个老师 states that there exists one teacher associated with me. Without a subject to "have" the existence of the word after 有, it's just a statement of existence (and/or the subject is implied). So here 没有打折 means there exists no discount/there has not been created a discount/a discounting action has not occured.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2snPXwPR

If they are not on sale i won't buy them marked wrong ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ayose...

In my dictionary 打折 appears only as a verb, "to give a discount", but here we see it a a noun ("discount"). Can it mean both?

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