"Her donkey can hear my chickens."

Translation:Její osel slyší má kuřata.

11/18/2017, 6:17:15 PM

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/agtorres1012

I translated this phrase as "Její osel muže šlyšet moje kuřata" but I was corrected to "Její osel slyší moje kuřata", but this is more "her donkey hears my chickens". Am I right?

11/18/2017, 6:17:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Nemesis_NaR

Maybe a native English speaker can clarify better the difference between sentences "He can hear them" and "He hears them".

My knowledge is that English, for verbs of sences, uses aditional verb "can". I know for sure that "I smell" means "I stink" but "I can smell" means "I have the ability to smell." Using this logic, the prefered correct English translation is "He can hear them."

And now back to Czech - we don't use "může" in the way English does with verbs of sences and therefore translating it is wrong.

However, to make things even more complicated, the sentence "Její osel může slyšet má kuřata" isn't wrong - it makes sence but one would expect the sentence to continue: "He can hear them when something"...

11/18/2017, 8:44:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/AzzyDassler
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Oh, come on, your last paragraph makes it totally fine to use the "může slyšet" phrase. Because the given sentence has no context.

I kinda understand what you're trying to explain, but it's all lame because of the lack of context. As a standalone sentence, I think in can be translated both ways.

Not to mention that it is all simply misleading.

6/8/2018, 10:37:33 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/VladaFu
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Do you consider "I can see you." and "I am able to see you." to be the same? Are you American or British?

I think you are interpretting the last paragraph incorrectly. "Může slyšet" is about the potential ability to hear something. Maybe he does not hear anything actually, but he is able to. "He can hear you" normally means the same as "Here hears you" if you happen to live in the area where you can say "I see" and not only "I can see".

6/8/2018, 12:41:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanCowballs

Native English speaker here. He can hear them implies the possibilty of hearing as in... if he wasnt wearing headphones he could hear them or in the present tense, he can hear them but he isnt listening. He hears implies that he is actively listening. Without the can is more specific to an ongoing action definitely happening versus the possibility that it could. It changes the sentence considerably.

12/10/2018, 4:29:36 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/VladaFu
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You simply do not use "může slyšet" in Czech. You use "slyší" often even when speaking about a possibility. In negative sometimes "nemůže slyšet" might be OK but not for the most of "I can't hear you", that is really only "neslyším tě".

12/10/2018, 7:48:41 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/on-Rock
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Why there is an error when i typed "jeji osel muze slyset me slepice" ???

12/5/2017, 10:19:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/kacenka9
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please read previous explanations. Your sentence would be "Her donkey is able to hear my hens"

12/6/2017, 7:23:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/fehrerdef
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Why do they always include this "can" in connection with verbs of perception? That leads me to try a translation using "může" and getting rated wrong. Very confusing.

12/14/2017, 11:22:56 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/BoneheadBass
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I understand your frustration, and I share it! To compound it, this sentence might also be translated as simply "Her donkey hears my chickens." I've more or less gotten used to this, so sometimes I include "can" in the English translation and sometimes I don't. My experience has been that both versions usually work.

2/4/2018, 11:56:35 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Filomena.Prvni

"Her donkey is can hearing my chicken." - right?

5/10/2018, 1:54:00 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/AzzyDassler
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No, this is very poor English. Either "Her donkey can hear ..." or "Her donkey is able to hear ..."

6/8/2018, 10:28:51 AM
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