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  5. "今年生日你会怎么过?"

"今年生日你会怎么过?"

Translation:How will you celebrate your birthday this year?

November 18, 2017

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/colinmcw

"What will you do for your birthday this year?" should be correct, reported 11/22/17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErickLinn

I do think that it is a right answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jorjorswens

How will you spend your birthday this year

This means exactly the same thing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

I wouldn't say that "spend" means the same thing as "celebrate", but it does mean the same thing as 过 in this context, and should be the default translation. To my mind, the Chinese doesn't presume that the birthday will be celebrated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RossGarton

That's how I translated it too. Hopefully it becomes an acceptable answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nikking01

Why is 过 used here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jorjorswens

it means go through... or "spend" in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sara770702

Because celebrate birthday is 过生日


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/varigby

It means "spend" here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErickLinn

but we also 庆祝生日, lit. celebrate abirthday.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeCrapse

but in normal everyday speech i've never heard someone use qingzhu when guo is so much more fangbian an has the exact same meaning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skyler178986

"What are you doing for your birthday?" should be correct!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

"How are you celebrating your birthday this year?" should also be an acceptable answer.
Chinese and English have different syntax so many answers are possible. However, "celebrate" is, I think, a better answer as compared to "spend" colloquially.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

过 here is used in the sense of 度过新年 or 佳节 or 生日, all happy occasions one celebrates with family or friends. This is a tricky one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daltonstout59

nowhere can I find that "过“ also means to celebrate


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fourthwall1

过, how do you "pass/over" your birthday is also meant as celebrate. A native speaker would also use this word for whatever festivities. Such as "how will you 过 The Nine Emperor Gods Festival?"

But this entire course fails to account for many other ways which are considered valid alternatives for a native speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeCrapse

guo doesn't mean to celebrate literally, however, guonian means celebrate new year, and guo shengri means celebrate your birthday, etc. There are many other cases


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YozuTei

I guess "How will you hold your birthday this year" is grammatically wrong in english?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miriam442403

Yes. Celebrate isn't the best choice either, though, it should most accurately be spend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DwayneKohn

"This year what will you do on your birthday?" is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rianwardana

"How would you celebrate your birthday this year" is marked wrong. Reported 2020 02 12


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JGreene68356

Isn't this the same "过" that we were taught applies to past events? (Eg, "你去过那儿吗"). I'm confused as to why it can be used here to refer to a future event. Based on the previous lesson, i thought this sentence was "How DID you celebrate your birthday this year?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ramy184050

Why do we need "this year". I don't believe it is needed, but I am most likely wrong. Can someone help please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ramy184050

Where is "your" here? Can the translation be: "How will you celebrate this year's birthday?" Isn't it possible that they are talking about the her son's birthday?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jim750574

其实,经常忘记


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MK-Inferno

STOP WORRYING ABOUT GRAMMAR

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