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  5. "这是你的爸爸吗?"

"这是你的爸爸吗?"

Translation:Is this your father?

November 18, 2017

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Slade366

How would you say, Is that your father? Like you're pointing out a person in public?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikeyjkk

A more common sentence in English imo. 'Is this' is far less common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stupedfatidiot

Would you usually say 他是你的爸爸吗?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Olgi_Tawakhal

"Is this your papa ?" Incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nami806696

This sentence is incorrect. Unless people are asking if objects are dads.... A better way of saying it would be Is he your father?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diegor2

I think it's fine to use 这 for people meaning "this person", but I'm not a native speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diegor2

I think it's fine to use 这 for people, meaning "this person", but I'm not a native speaker.


[deactivated user]

    Such a rude question Or statement. Literally. To me it sounds like "IS THIS your father like?

    Gosh, I wouldn't say such a bad exclamation to someone's dad, no matter how badly he had behaved or is.

    But, thanks Duo, this sentence is very usefull. 我爱我的家人。


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NRDICKERSON4

    I disagree. I feel like, I'm no Chinese language expert, that the saying doesn't come off as offensive in Chinese as it does in English and that the course makers are trying to get us used to associating locations with things/people that we're talking about. Replacing "this" with "that" would make it sound more natural to an English speaker but we are here to learn Chinese, not English. Translating it that way makes it less confusing and stops people from commenting that Duo is using words inconsistently.

    Calling a goldfish a "poisson or" or saying that it's gold instead of red would make you sound weird in French because a goldfish is called a poisson rouge and is seen as red in color. While my example wasn't the best, I'm trying to say that trying to make translations of Chinese sentences fit into everyday English could lead to people missing the meaning behind the words in another language. If we aren't taught and constantly told that "x" means this in "x" language, we might sound weird to the speakers of the language that we're learning.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nadya464264

    I answered "is it your father?" And it was false? Srsly?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Desurage

    I don't hear the 吗 when the guy says it, but I hear it when the lady says it


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoonlightN11

    How to differentiate between THIS and THAT?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nuriayasmin

    Duolingo's Chinese course is really frustrating. They speak much too fast and been given only the Chinese characters without pinyin makes it impossible for beginners to learn properly. I also have lessons and a busuu subscription, I'd not be able to make any progress just with duolingo. It's a pity because other courses are really good.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeroenFran11

    I would say dad is as good as father, just a little less formal. Both translations should be right for爸爸


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Franco5151

    Another weird statement. Nobody would ever say "This is your father" unless it was some sort of crazy long lost reunion.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hot_Pot

    This is a question (note the 吗 at the end of the sentence). And I think "Is this your father?" is a perfectly fine question to ask when, say, you're showing someone a picture of someone you think might be their father.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Irene962434

    Another stupid answer. I'm done with Chinese course.

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