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  5. "他要鱼。"

"他要鱼。"

Translation:He wants fish.

November 19, 2017

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ynhockey

The lesson is called Drink. Is there a fish drink in China I should know about? :))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NinaKz

Soggy fish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian894876

Mmm... nothing like a tall, cool glass of fish! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbaddonWan

要 just means want, need, sometimes means “is going to”, '他要走了'means ‘he is going to leave’


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TellTheSeal

他要鱼。

他姓“麦克卢尔”,叫“特洛伊”。可能你认识他因为你看过他的电影。。。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessicaPer136520

Isn't 鱼肉 a better way to say fish as in food you eat? Thats how I learned it previously.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

No. It has to do with how foods are normally served. Fish and chicken are usually served whole. If you use the terms 鱼肉, 鸡肉 you refer to a fillet or the minced meat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessicaPer136520

that makes sense. So if I eat pieces of chicken (like fried chicken from KFC) would I then use 肉?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TellTheSeal

There are several variations, perhaps even enough to satisfy Conor MacSweeney (of the Young Offenders), such as:
- 鸡肉 = chicken meat
- 鸡块 = chicken nugget(s)
- 鸡米花 = chicken nugget(s) / popcorn chicken
- 柠檬鸡 = lemon chicken
- 炸鸡 = fried chicken
- 鸡丁 = diced chicken (meat)
- 烤鸡 = roast(ed) chicken
- 宫保鸡丁 = Kung Pao chicken (aka "spicy diced chicken")
- 醉鸡 = chicken in rice wine (aka "drunken chicken")
and so forth.

A funny one that offers insight into how the Chinese language works (how words are connected together to form other words or phrases) is 口水鸡 , which indicates "steamed chicken with chili sauce," but literally, 口水 means "saliva," being a compound of 口 , mouth, and 水 , water (i.e., saliva = mouth water); hence, "mouth water chicken," or "mouth watering chicken," or "saliva chicken," if you prefer to read it that way, refers to this dish made of chicken with chili sauce. Of course, "mouth watering chicken" is the most sensible of the literal translations in English.

Then there is this man, who often has a bucket of KFC on his mind (so to speak), and tells us the truth:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyQJH615KwA


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahwong1

lol, why is there a fish in the drinks unit (-.-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HalimahMuh

I answered 'She wants fish' and got it wrong. I thought 他 can be use for both gender?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flaviantzv

The pronounciation tā is indeed used for both genders. Nevertheless, in writing, the characters are different. 他 = he; 她 = she. To remember this more easily, check out how the first half of the character 她 is 女, which is the character for woman.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkWootton

这个是我的猫写的吗?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanCoughl7

I would literally pay extra for the vegan version of duolinguo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leillia

It says it can mean need as well as want. I put need, and it marked it wrong :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leillia

Apparently "he needs fish" is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laetee

why is "he want fish" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JArgeles

Because it "want" should have an s.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John_on_Du

Dear Duolingo creators of the Chinese course. I learned from a Chinese class that 要 means to consider. 想 or 想要 would be best for this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew-Lin

"要" can mean "want" or "need" without context. I think "想要" would be less ambiguous to express "want". But "他想魚" is not acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

I cannot think of a case that 要 means consider. Could you provide the text you have?

他想魚 is definitely not acceptable. 想 with a direct object only is acceptable when the direct object is a person. 我想你 means I miss you, I keep thinking about you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarriottPlayer

I also learned Chinese from a (college) class; I can assure you that 要 means "want" and fits just fine in this sentence.

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