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  5. "对不起,我可以向你借笔记吗?"

"对不起,我可以向你借笔记吗?"

Translation:Sorry, can I borrow the notes from you?

November 20, 2017

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michelle.ko

"sorry, could I borrow your notes?" should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickeL9740

Yes, i typed this and i got it correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pkoutsenko

There is no BUT in the Chinese text


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SSSRoaB

That's more a property of the English language. Though I do agree that they should change it to 'Sorry, can I...' to minimize confusion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tgaertig

Why is 向 used here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

I believe it's part of the sentence structure for 借/borrow. 向你借something ”向你“ is like "from you" “借" is borrow.

"向你借something" is like "borrow something from you"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick_Dark

"向" can mean "from" per https://resources.allsetlearning.com/chinese/grammar/Expressing_%22towards%22_with_%22xiang%22#Used_as_.22from.22. So, the latter half of the reference sentence is literally "I can from you borrow notes?" and follows a 向 + target + verb pattern.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickeL9740

It is more likely to explain it like " I am here facing to you." It is like a action that is intend to something or someone. Not only a meaning of "from' but also "to". for example, 我冲向他。I rush to him. I borrowed a pen from him.我向他借了一支笔。 我从他那借来了一支笔。(I borrowed a pen from him(there). 那(这)。。verb来direct object means "did something and gained something from xxxxxx(there).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jimjams00

Better yet, 'excuse me, may/might I borrow your notes?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickeL9740

Why does it need a but


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankieW5

Excuse me, could I borrow your notes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taffystar

"Sorry, may I borrow your notes?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulXuHuan

I entered "a notebook" instead of "notebook" and got it wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grippygecko

Also it's not notebook, it's notes. 笔记本 would be notebook.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickeL9740

Because the notebook here has a possession state which is "your",therefore you cant say can i borrow a notebook.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Terence364703

'Excuse me. Can I borrow your notes please' was wrong. Punished for being polite again I guess...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FuCnSW

This one expresses more polite. It sounds like you wanna borrow something from the stranger. The way between friends should be 我可以借你筆記嗎

Though this sentence gramatically means 2 opposite questions. But only can I borrow your note is frequently used. If you don't want confuse yourself, put 的 then becomes 你的筆記 is more clear.

By the way, here 跟 can substitute 向, 我可以跟你借筆記嗎 is also polite speaking. 向 is too polite not used often nowadays.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricGohi

I don't understand why the come before the


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KynaPat

Lol. I never would have guessed this Chinglish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ckjuAOD9

Sorry, can you borrow me your notes?
what is wrong with this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

"You borrow me" is not right. Two correct setences are: "Sorry, can you lend me your notes?" and "Sorry, can I borrow your notes?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beaudanner

Yeah, if someone didn't say "but" to me I would be completely lost.

Sorry, can I borrow your notes? (Sorry BUT can you repeat that clearly?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beaudanner

Sorry, but can I borrow your notes? (oh, if you don't repeat "I" twice we don't know who we're talking about. so sorry!) Ugh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beaudanner

I'm still refusing to write "but" just so you can count it right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beaudanner

will you hurry up and please fix this "but" requirement for god sake? waste my time

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