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  5. "你很高兴,我也很高兴。"

"你很高兴,我也很高兴。"

Translation:You are happy, I am also happy.

November 20, 2017

170 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonijminte

Why is "very" sometimes translated and sometimes not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neekee

So my understanding is that the meaning of 很, when used with adjectives, is much closer to "is" (it's used basically all the time without carrying much weight) BUT the behavior is much closer to "very", since if you pick another adjective it will replace 很, rather than being used in addition. Since in other situations it does mean "very" and it's important to get used to adjectives not requiring a verb to link them with the noun, most language courses seem to just teach it as "very" and then slowly wean you off translating every emotional state expressed in Chinese as extra intense ;)

I do think both translations should be allowed and would report any sentences that don't, though. The course staff do seem to be actively fleshing out the range of accepted translations based on that feedback :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FloraYouse

So helpful comment. Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexis6273

I get very confused if 很 means is, doesn't 是 means is too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

@Alexis - not a native speaker, but below is based on my learnings from dozens of great discussions here involving native speakers. 是 can be used only to connect two nouns, 很 is for noun and adjective. e.g. 他是学生 (ta shi xue sheng) = He is a student. But 他很高兴 (ta hen gao xing) = He is happy. Hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pokewawa

Very helpful, thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuei-Ti

(I'm a native speaker.) 很 means "very," not "to be." As many native speakers like to exaggerate things, 很 is used so frequently that its effect has faded so much that some native speakers simply assume people don't really mean"very" when using 很. This has led some native speakers who have learned some English grammar but haven't learned certain Chinese grammar to misunderstand 很 and think it's the counterpart of "to be" (it's not). By the way, you don't need 很 to connect a noun and an adjective. 我高兴 is valid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melkajah

很 means very.....Chinese native use to say 你高兴,我也高兴。( you are happy i am also happy)....so to me 你很高兴,should be translated as you are very happy....So i am getting also a bit confused as well but more regarding the use of 很....so if someone have an explanation...:-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

@melkajah - As I said I'm not a native speaker and no expert, but based on what I've learnt from other native speakers, 很 is a noun-adjective connector and also means "very" sometimes (not always). When not using 很 as a connector, the sentence meanings may change quite a bit and 你高兴,我也高兴 means "If you are happy, then I'm also happy". I might be wrong but that's what I've picked up here on this forum.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melkajah

thanks RajasDaith .-) Your remark make sense regarding the imply. However if i had to translate "If you are happy, then I'm also happy" İ would say 如果你高兴, 那我也高兴. But same here i am not a native speaker and i might be wrong....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuei-Ti

(I'm a native speaker.) 很 means "very," not "to be." As many native speakers like to exaggerate things, 很 is used so frequently that its effect has faded so much that some native speakers simply assume people don't really mean"very" when using 很. This has led some native speakers who have learned some English grammar but haven't learned certain Chinese grammar to misunderstand 很 and think it's the counterpart of "to be" (it's not). You're right about not having 很. 我高兴 is valid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaMic2018

As a native speaker, who also consulted with other native speakers, I can vouch that the verb "to be" is often implied in Chinese. Therefore, contrary to so many people's claims, 很 is not needed to connect the subject (ex. 我) to the adjective (ex. 高兴). Think of the common questions 你好吗? or 你好不好? There's no "to be" or any verb in those sentences. The sentences 我病了, 我生病了 and 我有病 (literal translation "I have sickness.") all mean "I'm sick," but the first one contains NO verb. Therefore, please ONLY use 很 if you want to express "very." (Yes, people may use 很, similarly to the "very" used in "Very happy to meet you" without truly meaning it, as in being polite/welcoming, but this doesn't make 很 a connector word.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuei-Ti

I'm also a native speaker. I'm glad to see this comment - finally a correct one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RiddhiDhar

Thanks for the information. Took a screenshot. Please keep discussing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jerry969

I disagree. 很 is strictly a linking verb in the positive statement structure. It cannot be omitted if no other linkers exist. I.e “我病了” is correct but"我病" is wrong because of this "了” linker implies a finish tense. Similarly, "我好了” is correct but "我好” is wrong. Only the"我很好” is correct. “我饿了” is correct while “我饿” is wrong. However, "我很好" “我很饿” “我很病” are all gramatically correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuei-Ti

Based on your logic, would you please explain how the sentences below are correct or incorrect?

  1. 你好。

  2. 大家好。

  3. 天寒地冻。

  4. 夜深人静。

  5. 眼高手低。

  6. 「番椒丛生,白花,果俨似秃笔头,味辣,色红。 (from 《遵生八签》)

  7. 西风烈,长空雁叫霜晨月。 (to know the source, please search it online)

  8. 目光短浅。

  9. 印度消费者对iPhone 11不买账:价格贵、没吸引力 (from https://news.mydrivers.com/1/646/646725.htm)

  10. 风大!出门要小心!全台19县市发布强风特报 (from https://news.ltn.com.tw/news/life/breakingnews/2920866)

  11. 你聪明,我傻瓜。 (see https://www.npf.org.tw/1/7748 for more info)

  12. 桑洲风景好 (from http://nh.cnnb.com.cn/system/2020/06/08/012113764.shtml)

  13. 半夜肚子饿 (https://www.hk01.com/%E6%95%99%E7%85%AE/479261/%E5%81%A5%E5%BA%B7%E5%AE%B5%E5%A4%9C-%E5%8D%8A%E5%A4%9C%E8%82%9A%E9%A4%93%E9%BB%9E%E9%A3%9F%E5%85%88%E5%94%94%E5%82%B7%E8%BA%AB-%E7%87%9F%E9%A4%8A%E5%B8%AB%E6%95%996%E5%A4%A7%E5%8E%9F%E5%89%87%E6%B8%9B%E8%BA%AB%E9%AB%94%E8%B2%A0%E6%93%94)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Levi
  • 2393

Read the tips and notes at the beginning of the module.
2017.11.21


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aelfwyne

Tips don't show on mobile. Makes it very confusing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dpatkat

2019 Apeil tips on mobile now. I am a Plus subscriber. But maybe available to all now. Otherwise, before subscribing, i preferred studying from browser so i could access tips.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Torben879342

Can confirm that it shows also for a non plus subscriber


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SrPhilippe

Now the app shows the tips


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephanieOS

I thought it was an error and reported it...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZhangtheGreat

While 很 does mean "very," it does not have the same weight as English. In Chinese we throw 很 around like it's nothing. For instance, we can say something is 很大 (very large) when it's only somewhat large, whereas in English, "very large" must mean VERY large.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuei-Ti

Sometimes people do mean "very," but you're right a lot of people use 很 without meaning it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/La_Esperantisto

Hěn 很 means something like to feel when its in dront of an Adjektive (我很高兴 - i feel happy)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuei-Ti

No. 很 means "very" (although a lot of people use it without meaning it). "Feel" in Chinese would be 觉得.

Ex. 我觉得很高兴。 I feel very happy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/martonricsi2010

I do not english, I study now the english and please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GameObject

Why is there no slow playback button? They speak so fast for new learners.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leonardo_t4

I know. They should talk slow like google translater


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazyEinstein

Tips and notes

When we want to describe something we don’t use the verb “to be”, we have to put something else before an adjective. The most common word used to do this is 很 hěn, which literally means very. It goes between the subject (who or what we are describing) and the adjective (what we are describing it as). Since 很 is used so often like this, it oftentimes doesn’t mean “very”, just a link between a noun and an adjective.

*Pinyin in brackets is the actual pronunciation as a result of the change of tone.

Chinese ----- Pinyin ----- English

我很好。----- Wǒ hěn[hén]* hǎo. ----- I'm good.

你很高兴。----- Nǐ[ní] hěn gāoxìng. ----- You are happy.

The word for “also” or “too” is much less flexible in Chinese than in English. It must always come after the subject and before the verb.

Chinese ----- Pinyin ----- English

我也认识你。----- Wǒ[wó] yě rènshi nǐ. ----- I also know you. / I know you, too.

我也很高兴。----- Wǒ yě[yé] hěn gāoxìng. ----- I am happy, also. / I am also happy.

也 can also be used in the phrase "If X is... then Y is (also) ..." Here we don't need to use 很.

Chinese ----- Pinyin ----- English

你高兴,我也高兴. ----- nǐ gāoxìng, wǒ[wó] yě gāoxìng. ----- If you are happy then I am happy.

你很高兴,我也很高兴。----- nǐ[ní] hěn gāoxìng, wǒ yě[yé] hěn gāo xìng. ----- You are happy, I am also happy.

我高兴,他也高兴。----- wǒ gāo xìng, tā yě gāoxìng ----- If I am happy then he is happy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaMic2018

I'm a native Chinese speaker who's testing through the Duolingo Chinese program to review written Chinese. In Chinese, the verb is not necessary or can be implied by the adjective. Therefore, hen to me always means very. I can say I am happy with 我高兴. Also, "if" is not implied in "你高兴,我也高兴. ----- nǐ gāoxìng, wǒ[wó] yě gāoxìng. ----- If you are happy then I am happy" If someone said "你高兴,我也高兴" to me, I would understand it as "You're happy. I'm happy as well."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sikeryali

谢谢你 Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Devosh

Thank you. I can't read the notes on mobile, so this is very helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manu900579

Where are those notes? I have only used Duolingo as an Android app.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pietro460054

They are on tge desktop version. You can check them on mobile by looking on chrome or other browsers and clicking see as desktop/pc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NamrataSam

That is such a pity, they have not integrated the full experience in the app! I can only squeeze Duolingo in during my commute on the app. :( I am sure there are many like me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathan734508

I didn't know you could read discussions on mobile


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

Thank you a lot for every thing you wrote !

Had there been a clarification like this for every comment , it would've been a blessing for mobile users.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MauroEzequ6

This guy explained it a hundred times, and people continue asking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph516503

So if 很 is just a link between, for example, "I" and "happy", and doesn't mean "very"... how would one signify that "I am very happy"? Would this be 我很很高兴 ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grippygecko

not 很很. There are other words you can use to increase the intensity of your happiness. You could say 我真高兴,or 我非常高兴, or even 我高兴及了


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulaMead

thats alot of work for lazyEinstein


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krishna.shree

Omg truth to be told; I always thought "hen" was "feel"; based on context (never learnt the text before; just had housemates who were really awesome and were teaching me some phrases ... however they were local South East Asians so it could be different... but I always found that assuming hěn was feel made many of the phrases make sense; "i feel warm" (wo hen re) wo hen hao (i feel good) etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uyenkhoii

Thank you. It's really helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markushopkins

I think "You are happy, and I am too" should be accepted based on the way "too" is used in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miles82007

I think 'is very' should be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gweilo89

When would you use this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emerald

how are commas and periods translated?
in the sentence, it has the comma in the middle, and ends with the circle period. however, the translation says each one is a sentence. Why does the chinese have the comma?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tina552856

Please translate "hen" as very. Was taught mandarin in Shanghai, and the teachers there would not use it unless you actually wanted to say l am "very" happy (or anything else for that matter)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doug264842

Commas shouldn't be used here in the English translation. It should be either a semicolon or a period.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonathanPrus

"Ah, you are happy, I am as well"                      "A, nǐ hěn gāoxìng, wǒ yě yīyàn" "啊, 你很高兴, 我 也 一样"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/348549080

Doesn't "很" mean very?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuei-Ti

It does. (I'm a native speaker.) As many native speakers like to exaggerate things, 很 is used so frequently that its effect has faded so much that some native speakers simply assume people don't really mean"very" when using 很. This has led some native speakers who have learned some English grammar but haven't learned certain Chinese grammar to misunderstand 很 and think it's the counterpart of "to be" (it's not).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuei-Ti

I tell the complete answer only to people I trust :) There are too many people who might use my answer against me @_@ Anyway, I'm American.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

你美国人. I'm learning to avoid the "to be", Arabic style. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuei-Ti

Interesting :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GS_no.934

The sentence sounds kind of sad in a way


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bossgamesr

I got it wrong cause I didn't put a period which has never happened


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvanLei2

Why did they repeat 很高兴 twice?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

You are happy, I am also.

Sounds better? No.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elbereth15

I'm beginning to stop using English punctuation in translations. Not good. I might stop using it at work :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vana469860

Thanks guys for your explanation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michele506255

Ugh. Not clear when click on characters. Could mean nice or happy...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliviaMcWh5

I just mixed up the words i said "I am happy you are also happy" you think it would be right this is crazy driving me nuts!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

@Olivia - Why do you think your answer should be wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AutumnTafoya0

Is there a difference between 高兴 and 快乐?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuei-Ti

高: high, tall

兴: interest, delight

快: (things going) smoothly, smooth

乐: happy

They're pretty similar, but 高兴 indicates a higher level of happiness, even excitement while 快乐 emphasizes how things are going smoothly and going well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alirezafxt

you are very happy i am very happy too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daoist-Papa

In the example page I could swear they translate the first part as "IF you are happy..." If I am correct, why there and not here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yomalyn

There is a small difference between the sentences. Watch for the 很 (hěn) character! It literally means "very", but can affect sentence meaning in other ways.

The Tips and Notes

Examples (from Tips and Notes):

This sentence DOES NOT HAVE 很 (hěn), and translates WITH IF... 你高兴,我也高兴。nǐ gāoxìng, wǒ yě gāoxìng. If you are happy then I am happy.

This sentence DOES HAVE 很 (hěn), and translates WITHOUT IF... 你很高兴,我也很高兴。nǐ hěn gāoxìng, wǒ yě hěn gāo xìng. You are happy, I am also happy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daoist-Papa

Thank you. I will move forward with this as the rule. Much appreciated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karuna8063

Very helpful, I also remembered it being "if...then". so seeing it again was necessary for me to understand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaMic2018

As a native speaker, who also consulted with other native speakers, I can vouch that the verb "to be" is often implied in Chinese. Therefore, contrary to so many people's claims, 很 is not needed to connect the subject (ex. 我) to the adjective (ex. 高兴). Think of the common questions 你好吗? or 你好不好? There's no "to be" or any verb in those sentences. The sentences 我病了, 我生病了 and 我有病 (literal translation "I have sickness.") all mean "I'm sick," but the first one contains NO verb. Therefore, please ONLY use 很 if you want to express "very." (Yes, people may use 很, similarly to the "very" used in "Very happy to meet you" without truly meaning it, as in being polite/welcoming, but this doesn't make 很 a connector word.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

@GaMic - fact tip. Not all native speakers of English score a band 9 in IELTS assessments. Spotting something in the language at one place does not make it true elsewhere. English example - "He reads a book" CORRECT, "I reads a book" INCORRECT.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_notasdf

Shouldn't it be You are very happy. I am also very happy?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phb2013

I wonder if when you want 很 to mean "very" in this sentence you have to provide the verb 是 - as in 我是很高兴。 Or would you have to say 我是很地高兴。 Does anyone know?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArtemiaHoi

Nope. The statement "我是很地高兴。" is an ungrammatical construction in Chinese. "我很高兴。" by itself already means "I am very happy", wherein "am very" is denoted by "很" in this case. It's rather similar to "我非常高興", where "非常" denotes "am extremely".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CAMG645897

Could "You are happy, as am I." Work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JensPetter7

You are very happy, I am also very happy. They didn't include 2x of the word "very"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emerald

how come in one of the corrections it showed "You are happy, and I am also happy", but here it shows as 2 seperate sentences "You are happy. I am also happy" ? (note it accepts I am happy too as correct)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Betty216058

How i can know the translate!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wimgrzyj1

There is no correlating word for 'and' in the example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pedrovlm

if you are happy, I'm happy too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattStarr1

iirc, the use of 很 and similar modifiers is often a consideration of cadence, rhythm, etc. it doesn't sound right to a native speaker if the wrong number of syllables are spoken. Kinda like in English songs, where you things are described as "old" or preceded with a "this" or "that", because the line has fewer beats than the melody.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YodasWs

I tried "you're pleasured", but the test said that was wrong and that the answer was "You're pleased". Both don't make much since in English...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flowercaps

I keep mixing up 你 and 我 for some reason...Anyone have any tips on not getting Me and You mixed up because it's frustrating to be below on my skills level because I'm interpreting it wrong :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ja52ng74

I got a dodgy way of remembering.

The character for I: 我 (wǒ) looks similar to the japanese kanji for I: 私 (watashi).

我 and 私 both look similar and begin with a "w" sound

So then 你 (nĭ) by elimination is "You"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewWatts18

我 is actually used in Japanese too, but it's われ (ware), which is one of many 1st person personal pronouns in Japanese. (私 (watakushi, watashi, atashi, washi)、我 (ware)、僕 (boku)、俺 (ore), etc.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanJeffSu

Check the pattern. I used to think that "Ni" is there's like a one slide on a stick while "Wo" has a 3 slide, and a bended stick. I this thing didn't, try to write it ten times on a paper. It's the best way to memorize.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Majamus1

Try this; wo/WOW I'm to cool (look at the symbol until you see a man learning cool against the door). And "you'r NOT/ni" (look at the symbol til you see a man just standing with his arms hanging down)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leisheng

Ok, but in English "I am happy also" is a perfectly valid translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daleyzhang

"You're happy so I am also happy" wasn't an accepted translation, is it because of my use of the word "so?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cecil164832

Sorry. This is the kind of thing you'd say if you were on drugs. You are happy! I am happy!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KhaMinhKhanh

I didn't use "also", but I used "I am happy, too", and I got it wrong =.=...

Please allow some flexibility for similar expressions...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaunDavis13

LOL Confusing, but fun


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zarkian

I like it when you get it correct and then yu can wipe out the answer and just say you did nothin' XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannaha70093

Is this phrase common in China or related to their culture in some way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArtemiaHoi

I'm Chinese, though not from China so I can't exactly vouch for their use. Where I'm from, "你很高兴,我也很高兴。" is usually (if ever) spoken as "你高兴,我也很高兴。", where the second "很" is optional. It's generally used as a phatic tool mark agreeability, etc. It's not really commonly used, tbh...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaMic2018

A smoother translation would be you're very happy. I am as well or Me too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diyxa.

I wrote: "If you are happy, I am also happy." Why was this marked wrong? Please help.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/An-duo-crates

I would also agree that any instance using 很 should accept 'very.' Thus, if we write 很高兴 it should translate to 'happy' as well as 'very happy.' The intended meaning may not need the 'very' but I'm sure I'm not the only one that gets frustrated when getting that one wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wubiii

um so i had exactly the same answer as it should be but it was marked as wrong? What?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AerialSN1PER

repeat that but in english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aldier98_11

I had no idea what tne answer was will have to start it all over again i guess


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatyaPraka616744

Why "are" and "also" are same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pieter159453

I typed the exact sentence given as the correct translation and was still told that my translation is incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/348549080

Check for grammar and spelling mistakes. Be sure you haven't forgotten any words. Sometimes, you could have dropped some or many words. Those are my recommendations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bill949306

I am happy, you are happy too, is somehow not the same as you are also happy...?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Slimegirl4558

Idk makes no sence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessicaPer136520

You should accept 'I am happy too' along with 'I am also happy' since both are perfectly correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suppremer

My crush : Smiles

Me:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThreeDollar

I was trying to think of why I would ever even think that phrase...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregoryDon7

Imagine working on a project with someone and it has been rough going, finally they are satisfied with what you've presented and you are relieved to hear it. With a sigh of relief you say these words...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lavanya601237

I just don't understand where to use which word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hedaya911295

i said i am happy too which is the same meaning of i am also happy !!!! why the answer is wrong ???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sikeryali

Report it.

"You're happy, I am happy too." Should be accepted as correct translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cecibelma

audio and my answer: 你很高兴,我也很高兴 correct solution: 你很高兴,我也很高兴... but then shows that is incorrect so...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raphael145545

Can I say this phrase when i want to say if you are happy i am happy?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuei-Ti

It'd be clearer to use add 如果 to the beginning of "you are happy" - 如果你很高兴,我也很高兴。 The word 如果 means "if." 如 means "follow," and 果 means "fruit; result." A way to remember 如果 is thinking of it as "follow the result of."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MNga5

Hěn=very,used to connect a noun and an adjective


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregoryDon7

Hovering over the character for gao in this example shows "tall" and "high" as other translations of gao. Are these correct or is this a mistake? Does gao mean those things as well as "glad," "pleased," and happy? At the beginning of the lesson only hen was shown to also translate as "tall" and "high."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThreeDollar

I'm no expert, but I am pretty sure that 高 does mean "tall" and "high." I think that when paired with different characters it shows different meanings as many characters can mean multiple things. I don't think that 很 ever means tall or high, though. Again, I haven't been learning Mandarin for very long, so I could be wrong about that, but I am almost certain that "tall" or "high" can be a translation for 高but not for “很." Hopefully, that was correct and helpful and not just me typing nonsense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuei-Ti

高 means "tall," "high," etc. It doesn't mean "glad," "pleased," nor "happy"; however, when paired with 兴, which means "delight," here comes 高兴, which means "high level of delight," "happy," etc. 很 means "very"; it doesn't mean "tall" nor "high."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThreeDollar

This looks correct to me, but I doubt I would ever actually say that. It is an incredibly awkward phrase that I doubt is used, at least the English translation. It sounds like you are insisting someone else is happy. "You ARE happy. I'm telling you, you ARE!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magarthryx

"You are happy, I am happy too" was rejected. Despite too and also beig swapped on other problems and being accepted.

This has been my most problematic section.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linda437018

I think that i've got my lifetime dose of 很高兴 with Greetings 2. If i'll ever hear it again afterwards, i'll probably start screaming.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicole972171

My answer is 100% the same as the app's answer but why it said my answer was wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvanLei2

What the ❤❤❤❤! Is it appropriate to say "I are" and "You am?" Dictionary makes the answer incorrect!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ingi160123

it is difficult to take the placement test with simplify. what is this crap "兴" why not use as well this original 興. sorry for expressing my frustrations, I am learning to read books that i written in traditional Chinese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mellamokia

hola, estoy aprendiendo mandarin y no entiendo este frase , yo soy una nativa en ingles pero por favor ayúdame gracias (yo soy siempre)(correcta) (nunca equivocada)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valerie647239

My answer was correct and it was like false...why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheDesertF3

Something is wrong here


[deactivated user]

    Can this be used in everyday conversation or would you have to say "You are happy SO I am also happy?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuei-Ti

    This can be used when something is win-win for both parties (so both parties are happy).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jerry969

    Native speaker here. Many learners are confused about why “很” is not translated "very" here. In a "subject + 很 + adjective" structure, “很” is a linking verb meaning "to be". It only means "very" when a verb is present in a sentence. I.e “I feel very good” is “我感觉很好”. "I sing very well" as “我很会唱” or "我唱歌很好" . There are other different types of linking verbs as well such as "了”,“过了”. The rule of thumb is, there has to be one and only one verb in a simple sentence, contrary to a complex sentence.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CuddlesPanda

    itʻs soooooooooooooooooooooo harddddddddddddddddddddddd:(


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helen568846

    My answer was right!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helen568846

    My answer is right, but have been marked wrong 3times! Why?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mags726737

    Duolingo rejected 'I'm' for 'I am'. As a native English speaker they are interchangeable and should both be accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IdkLol962870

    I got t-bagged by Duolingo for not capitalizing my text.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HJyI20

    Why am can't + also?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claudio695

    I think there is a bug here. I wrote the sentence in the right way however the app understood I was wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DallasNormile

    What happened to it being possible as an "If... then..." when 也 is present?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DruLearnsChinese

    Is this phrase spoken often? and why wouldn't we use " ta me gao xing"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannaha70093

    WHY'D THIS GET DISLIKED???????!!!!!!!!!! (Please excuse me, I had caffiene)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abe1029

    I'm going around liking the wrongly disliked ones and disliking the stupid ones; therefore balancing it out. LOL... I disliked your comment


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkAnthon530123

    exactly. PLEASE FIX!!!!

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