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  5. "我不喜欢这里的菜,我不想给小费。"

"我不喜欢这里的菜,我不想给小费。"

Translation:I do not like the food here, I do not want to leave a tip.

November 20, 2017

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZingGot

I don't like the food here, I don't want to tip.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skydragat

I left this and was rejected. The phrase "give a tip" was suggested, and this is not proper English for tipping in restaurants; this is for advice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CinnamonTe1

"Give a tip" is perfectly fine in English. People usually say "leave a tip" because it's common to leave the money on the table when you walk out.

At other times, people hand the money directly to the server and also say a nice comment. You wouldn't say, "I'm leaving you a $50 tip because the service was so good" as you put the money directly in their hand. You would say "I'm giving you a $50 tip because the service was so good."

Either "leave" or "give" can be used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/g-c-

Idk about proper English, but saying "give a tip" in a restaurant context is definitely not uncommon in the U.S.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/varigby

Also very commonly used in the UK as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JOrlando3

only in the negative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisLons

Reported 2018 07 17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillisHershey

so was "leave a tip"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celticfiddleguy

Reported 16.1.18 "leave a tip" is more natural for this context. "give a tip" would mean "give some advice". However you might say "I won't be GIVING you / him / her / them a tip".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisLeverette

This is a bad example, because the person doesn't understand the service industry. The server didn't prepare your meal. They live on tips. Don't be a jerk. Leave a tip for the service provided.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dsweber2

That's how Tips work in America, but I'm not sure if that's how they work in China. I know Europeans basically don't have the practice at all, so I wouldn't necessarily expect the Chinese to have the same customs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JOrlando3

There aren't any tips in mainland China.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nevin711542

Not true in the definitive- there are a number of places, even restaurants that people do tip at now, usually at the high end. It's just not as common. In HK it is added but you can refuse it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wx.1b73c227d57f9

This is how tipping works in America, where it's somehow legal for a resturaunt to pay less than minimum wage. In most parts of the world, resturaunts legally have to pay wages that would otherwise be covered by tips, and hence you only tip if you genuinely enjoyed the service.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sonyChandr1

That's in your country. We don't have a pressure for tipping in Indonesia. Tipping is preference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisLeverette

This is not a lesson for teaching Mandarin to those whose first language is Indonesian. The lessons should be applicable to the cultures of the intended audience and the culture of the language being taught.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grippygecko

In many countries tips are discretionary, and wait staff have proper wages (this is only right, they work for a living they shouldn't be reliant on hand outs like a beggar), meaning if you got good service then you leave a tip. But I cannot justify refusing to leave a tip because you don't like the food at the restaurant. Especially if you said everything was fine when the waiter asked if everything was OK .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PonyFreckles

Here, we do leave tips, but it's at the discretion of the customer. It's illegal not to pay wait staff the at least the minimum wage, and illegal for restaurants to use tips to make up wages. It's also common practice for tips to be pooled and shared between staff at the end of the month and this often includes kitchen staff as well, as they're also responsible for the customer's experience but don't get the opportunity to be tipped directly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

Where is "here" for you, out of curiousity?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/c.elise.t

You know not all countries work like crappy USA right? In most of the world, waiters get a fair wage and tipping is only a sign of appreciation. Then in most of Asia tipping is non-existent, it's not even expected of you! Which is why it pisses me off when tourists do tip over there. Adjust to the culture of the country you're visiting, and don't spread a tipping culture if a country doesn't have that. I only leave tips in countries where tipping is a thing, and only if I liked the food AND the service was good. Grumpy waiter or slow service? Yeah, forget your tip. Remind me to never visit the US ever in my life, because it pisses me off that I should be the one paying someone's wage. That should be the restaurant's owner doing that and for me, that's not what tips are for. Tips are for showing you liked the food/service. Period.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewEpp5

Please flag it so they accept both "give a tip" and "leave a tip". Both are valid collocations for "tip".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephen_zissou

Don't leave tips in China anyway; no one tips in China.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/k800m800

"leave a tip" should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisLeverette

"I don't like the food here. I don't want to leave a tip." should be accepted. In English, leave a tip and give a tip have the same meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drewings1

"Cai" can mean food, but it more often connotes individual dishes, does it not? "Dishes" should be accepted for "cai."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clintack

It has a range of meanings. You can even use it to refer to different ethnic cuisines. It's the "food" in "Do you like Thai food?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karoliina765050

'Tip' works as a verb on its own, 'I don't want to tip' is a correct way of saying it and to me it sounds a lot more natural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unhappyboy

You don't not leave a tip because you don't like the food.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JOrlando3

The word bank is missing both "the" and "here," which makes it impossible to answer the question correctly. I did the best I could with what I had to work with, which was "I do not like food. I do not want to leave a tip." My only leftover words were "girl," "week," and "treat." It was marked incorrect. 04/16/19


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Prentice3

Not tipping because the service was bad is one thing, and somewhat justified. Not tipping a server because the food was bad is completely different. One does not tip or not tip on food, except in the case of a private chef. In a restaurant, tips go to the servers/bartenders and never go to the back of the house who prepare the meal. Punishing a server because a chef/cook has made crappy food is akin to shooting the messenger because they have bad news to share.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VictoriaXu14

"I don't like the food here, I don't want to leave a tip." is exactly the same meaning as "I do not like the food here, I do not want to leave a tip." I think my answer should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SmithUA01

"Tip" should, here and elsewhere, be accepted as an alternative to "give a tip".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lusheni

Why is the sentence rejected? "I do not like the food here, I don't want to give a tip"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

I don't know whether Duo cares about this, but your comma should be a period.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nevin711542

They do care. Just report it, I do comma splices sometimes, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

As far as i know and experienced, they don't care for that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chronicallylate

"I don't like this place's food, I don't want to give them a tip." was rejected


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottFencer

I was not given all of the articles necessary to make this sentence sound natural in English (i.e. "the" and "a")


[deactivated user]

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

    It should be "give ".

    Verb "leave" is different


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guatimozim

    I feel weird saying both verbs in the present tense. I'd say, "I didn't like …, I do not want …", or "I do not like …, I will not …".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikku15

    A native speaker would omit the second 我


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Maximilliano

    I don't like the food here, I don't want to leave a tip..WRONG!?! Really?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_leafdrops_

    "I do not enjoy the food here, I do not want to leave a tip" why is this incorrect? Under my understanding it shouldn't be


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xiyuema

    Duo is a cheapass.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shira330916

    Don't is a contraction of do not


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eljoy3

    I don't like the food here, i don't want give a tip


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lovelovelavish

    LOL people don't tip in China


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fumarase

    "I don't like the food here, so I don't want to give a tip." should also be accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JOrlando3

    There's no "so" in the Chinese. What is one sentence must be translated as two in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickSchmitt255

    "I do not like the food here, but since the servers don't make it, I'll gladly tip as much as I would have had the food been good" should be accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dcpetit

    "I don't like these dishes..." was rejected


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jieke694731

    Thats because its awkward.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jacobareed

    DUOLINGO. GET YOUR S*** TOGETHER. I HAVE REPORTED THIS FOR NOT ACCEPTING "I don't want to tip" MAYBE 5 TIMES.

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