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  5. "너는 이미 죽었다."

"너는 이미 죽었다."

Translation:You are already dead.

November 20, 2017

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/schifferjack

This is the korean equivalent of omae wa mo shindeiru


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KanKanMikan

shinda should be the most accurate equivalent


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

신다? Could you give an example?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coup_d.Etat

Oh, OP is talking about translating to Japanese. Indeed 死んだ (shinda) is closer to 죽었다. 死んでいる is closer to 죽어있다.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avertzy22

あなたはもう死んだ。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PixelatedMike

I'm assuming they use お前 (omae) instead of あなた because お前 is more rude and fitting to say to a villain


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UltimetaSy

나니?! or should I say...뭐?!?!


[deactivated user]

    뭐라고?!?!!?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

    Out of curiosity, can "너는" be shortened to "넌"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spawn6000

    Wait...so why is there a 다 at the end? Is this is the written form?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

    Yes. It's the impersonal "Plain form" (past tense in this case).

    It can be used in speech:

    • when musing to oneself.

    • as casual statements to friends or people younger than you. Usually used as an announcement or as exclamation (reaction).

    • in public, when addressing a large group of people when speaker doesn't know who the audience is.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spawn6000

    Ah thank you! I've been learning Korean for a while now and I never knew that the plain form could be spoken! :) I'm gonna go and look into it a bit more now online. Just one question, what do you mean by "musing to oneself"? Is that different from just talking about yourself in general?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

    Thinking and talking "to" oneself ...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobaBunny5

    So is "died" and "to be dead" the same? 죽었어?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

    (1) "죽다" (intransitive verb) is really a colloquial word for "to die", not usually referring to people = to stop living

    "죽었다" (죽다, past tense) = died.

    (2) 죽어 있다 (adjectival verb) means "dead" = no longer alive <- a resulting state of 죽다

    (3) 죽다 = to die || 죽어 있다 = (be) dead.

    • 그는 죽는다 = he dies = he stops living (죽다 present tense)

    그는 죽었다 = he died = he stopped living (죽다 past tense)

    • 그는 죽어 있는다= he is dead = he is no longer alive [ *있는다 = being, present state ]

    [Naver dict.] = lies dead

    • 그는 죽어 있었다 = he was dead = he was no longer alive [ *있었다 = been/done, past state ]

    [Naver dict.] = found dead

    (4) In common usage:

    죽었다 "died" (past tense) is also used (by inference) to mean is/are dead ( describing the present state)

    그는 죽었다 = he died --> he is dead.

    Edited March 2020


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Soniya_

    Is this sentence used to threaten someone in Korean?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myles288

    Is it purposely translated to "You are already dead" or can it also be "You already died"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaikandi

    Both are correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

    Think so.

    DLG wants to show that in common usage, 죽었다 (past tense of 죽다, die) can be used to describe its resulting state in the present i.e.

    죽었다 = died = is/are dead.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KanKanMikan

    of course it's not gonna be accepted, what else do I expect :/


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abarukaw

    히대부 아배시 다와바


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/astgarrido

    Thinking of K-dramas this might be useful: Goblin, Hotel del Luna, to name a few...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YW7k14

    뭐라고!!!??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lKfY7

    아타타타타타타타타타


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/julyfabipane

    드라마를 보는 것 같은데...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suhas121

    omae wa mo, shinderiu

    Learn Korean in just 5 minutes a day. For free.