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  5. "她们要热牛奶。"

"她们要热牛奶。"

Translation:They want hot milk.

November 20, 2017

50 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QianYanWanYu

她们=they (women)
他们=they (men or men+women man+woman man+women, etc.)

妳 = you (woman)
你 = you (man)

= female


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cazort

Do people actually use "牠们"=they (animals) or "祂们" = they (deities)? I've seen these discussed but never encountered them in online writing and don't have a sense of whether they're commonplace or archaic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QianYanWanYu

牠們 (tc) or 它们 (sc) = they (animals)
祂們 (tc) for deities

In China, obviously, only 他 她 它 remain, for deity, they use 他 or even 它.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TARDISToni

Wow. I have been studying Chinese since 1985, and I don't consciously remember ever seeing the character 牠 (or 祂 for that matter, although I probably saw them at some point while studying 文言). However, looking them up on Wiktionary, the first one at least - with the animal radical - is cited in dictionaries as old as 辞海 (1915) and 康熙字典 (1716), as well as more recent ones. They certainly aren't modern usage, anyway! It's possible thay they were used in 文言 (literary Chinese) and have since fallen out of use.

You can see the entry from the 1716 Kangxi Zidian here: http://www.kangxizidian.com/kangxi/0697.gif
It's written in literary Chinese; it gives the pronunciation (using some other archaic forms of 'it') and says a couple of other thjngs I've forgotten how to read. :) I'd like to look into this further, but for now, I think it's safe to say they're pretty much archaic/obsolete. That doesn't mean you might not see them occasionally in modern writing, though.

I'm curious where you even found these, Alex!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan946894

2020.6.1 I think I remembered seeing 牠 in a Chinese textbook for native speakers in 1984.

Although I don't think it's used much anymore when I enter "ta" on my pinyin keyboard, 牠 is one of the predicated characters


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

I was taught 它 for animals! I had no idea that was a simplified form of 牠 though! I've never seen 祂 or 妳 before!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abeauty5950

Same. I always been learning the simplified version from the Chinese textbooks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KoenFoo

祂 and 牠 are not simplified forms. They are only non-standardised forms. You are free to use them daily.

Edit: Typical duolingo community. I'm a native speaker ffs. Go and check out a Chinese Bible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CorgiCerberus

I've only seen 祂 used in translated versions of religious texts, like the Bible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KoenFoo

Why are you downvoted. You are absolutely correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan946894

2020.8.1
Maybe they are Mainlanders that don't appreciate traditional characters anymore since only 他 她 它 remain. ツ
Bring on the downvotes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GhappynowappT

Is there no acceptable English translation other than 'they' for questions that use 她?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CorgiCerberus

Well, 她 alone means "she". «她们» means "they", but in written Chinese denotes a group of women. The aforementioned is a bit particular-- most people opt for the general 他们 (or even 它们) that can be used for all sexes. In speech, it all sounds like tāmen, so it remains ambiguous


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jad498154

I draw this 女 in google translate it show me that the pinyin nü but when i write "nu" with my chinese keybord it did not show me this character So how can i get it ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bronwyn790018

谢谢你!I had been struggling with that for ages but that worked. Does anyone know why n+v works instead of n+u?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chetlin

There's no "v" in pinyin so it's easier to repurpose that if ü is needed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricoleRay

But what we learn , has to use "n+v" , like hotel 旅店, donkey 驴子,green绿色,aluminium铝 , will use "l+v" = which is " L + ü "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abeauty5950

I would type the English meaning of the character and hope that the right character appears. Or you could turn on the Chinese keyboard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schallaven

Like a lot of sentences, for "Type what you hear" it only accepts the female form of "they". Should be fixed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marmn96

This sentence is avaliable as audio and it doesn't accept 他們 instead of 她們 . If I only have audio I'm not able to know which one it is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew-Lin

她們要熱牛奶。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hotula

I wrote 他 instead of 她 and got it wrong, when it didn‘t specify gender oomf


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zevanoux

I wrote 她 and got it wrong, there was also no mention of gender. Why won't Duo accept both options (unless if specifically mentioned)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas.Zach

The problem with forcing 她们 in a listening exercise, is that duolingo is actually teaching you poor habits. If it's not clear what gender the "they" is, you should always use 他们. If Duolingo wants to enforce a specific answer they should enforce the masculine "tā" so we learn good habits.

As it stands it just forces you to guess which tā they decided to use today, and arbitrarily marks you wrong when you pick the wrong gender half the time. It's really frustrating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benulo

The thirst is real


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiloszLakomy

他们要热牛奶 should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thaklos

Should this be warm milk in English? Is hot milk a thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orzage

Yes, hot milk is very much a thing. For example, I pour a large glass of hot milk into my breakfast cereal (so that it's hot and soggy, more like a stew) and drink hot milk when eating cookies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QianYanWanYu

Just hot milk
热=hot
暖=warm
(e.g. 熱奶茶=hot milk tea)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kcmurphy

My boyfriend always wants hot (not warm) milk for his coffee so the milk doesn't bring down the temperature.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YouWei96

谁会要汤热的牛奶呀


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PianoMusic7

How do I know the difference between he (他) and she (她) or they (他們/她們), when I do not see the characters. There's just audio...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vN9J4

I thought it should be 她们要热的牛奶 (ta men yao re DE niu nai) ??????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RickyCheng12

That should also be an acceptable answer, yes. But it's optional. And in this case, I don't think most people wouldn't use 的. Typically you add that when answering a question like 他们想要什么样的牛奶?or 他们想要那一种牛奶?But as a statement of fact, where you aren't really trying to emphasize the adjective, you wouldnt really use 的.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas.Zach

的 is a possessive particle, like an 's in English. In this instance you would be saying "the hot's milk", implying the temperature owns the milk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ddaley1941

Is the difference in pronunciation with words in complete sentences and individual words significant?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffersonM376619

how is this male/female business still not fixed yet? it's by far the most annoying thing about learning chinese on duolingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doctorg48

The program would not let me attempt to speak the phrase and then marked it as wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fS4EI4nF

❤❤❤❤ THE SINGLE RIGHT ANSWERS!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christophe833891

How do you say soy milk, or almond milk? I wouldn't assume all Chinese people drink cow's milk when you translate it as just "milk"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Th3_D4rk_Kn1ght

LISTENING EXERCISE - "THEY" SHOULD ACCEPT 他们 OR 她们!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_kkaebsong_

Couldn't they say warm milk hot milk dosen't sound apetizing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abeauty5950

I think the better translation would be "They want warm milk."

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