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  5. "你爱看中国电影吗?"

"你爱看中国电影吗?"

Translation:Do you love watching Chinese movies?

November 21, 2017

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShannAwesome

Why would duolingo offer both "films" and "movies" as options in a multiple choice question? Trying to find out who is a cinephile?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oni

Both start with 電。 Easily confused for beginners.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oni

Oops, thought you meant between TV/movies. Ehh, maybe to be a little tricky. Or an issue with the autogeneration algorithm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oni

WARNING for learners: Currently the pronunciation of 影 is way wrong. By itself and in compounds!! It should like "ee-ng" not "yaw-ng" !!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Imnuts7

There's nothing wrong with it now imo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick_Dark

The pronunciation is apparently technically correct, but it's dialectical.

The standard pronunciation can be found at http://stroke-order.learningweb.moe.edu.tw/characterQueryResult.do?word=%E5%BD%B1.

The dialectical pronunciation can be found at https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E9%9B%BB%E5%BD%B1#Chinese. (You have to click "Expand" to get to the audio player.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ImeneLache1

Like in Chinese is 喜欢 and love is 爱


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChicoBabal

Why not 中国的, though? They never seem to be explaining what up with the most common charcter, 的. My Chinese teacher, for example, said you never use the particle when you mean your family members (so you would say "我妈妈..." And not "我的妈妈", which is a standard here.. and now this! Could anyone explain this to me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Utopial

In this case, 中国 is being used as an adjective meaning Chinese. If you use 中国的,it translates literally to China's, as a noun possessive. It is correct that if you couldn't use 中国 as an adjective you would have to use 中国的, but that is not the case. See for example 中国人, meaning Chinese person. 中国的人 would mean China's person, which is a bit of a strange phrase so it is not used. Hope that helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reo968149

This is only recording the first character. Always has me repeat it. Something is wrong as it used to work before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdityaJhav

Why is it 中国电影 and not 中文电影?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TellTheSeal

The former is movies made in China; the latter is movies in the Chinese language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hhif12

Do you love Chinese movie (without bloody S), and is wrong??? Do i really have to put a Chinese movie, or Chinese movies to be correct? I'm using a cell phone here. And I'm practicing Chinese, not English!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/suchen2019

i wrote 你 爱 看 中国 电 影 吗 in chiese axactly iqual an it did not accepted , that is unfear


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gracie349696

Mistake here by the robot! It marked as wrong 'Do you like to watch Korean movies'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MilanLin

What is wrong with "Do you like to see Chinese films?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LavethWolf

That would be 你们喜欢看中国电影吗? I believe. This sentence uses 爱 ( to love )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kuobenj

Do you like Chinese movies also works right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patcyw

not really, because the question is asking if you like to watch them, whilst yours is just asking if you like Chinese movies (it's broader so slightly different in that sense?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anabelocto

"Do you love Chinese movies?" Sounds Chinglish. It's more natural to say "Do you like...?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anabelocto

Then, you can answer "I love Chinese movies"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TarGrrrl

Agreed in English you almost never ask do you love something although you may ask do you love someone. Instead you ask do you like something, and if the person you ask really, really likes it, they may answer "I love (whatever)!".

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