"Misschienstopthijietsinmijnschoen."

Translation:Maybe he is putting something in my shoe.

11 months ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/apexaviour
apexaviour
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So "stoppen" also means to put or to stuff, and not just to stop / halt.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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Yep, that's correct. :)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/macneil88

I thought zit was used for putting something inside something else. Why has stopt been favoured here?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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"Zitten" is used for something being inside of something else. It's the result of someone "stoppen" it in there.

Just like "liggen" is the result of "leggen" and "staan" is the result of "zetten".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tracey843948

That's very helpful, Simius. Thank you.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DieFlabbergast
DieFlabbergast
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Another totally improbable sentence: the course is full of them!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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First of all it does not matter at all if a sentence is improbable or not (and if you cannot deal with that Duolingo probably is not the learning platform for you).

Second, in this case it is not improbable. Have a look at: http://www.dutchnews.nl/features/2015/11/ten-things-you-need-to-know-to-celebrate-sinterklaas/

Especially pay attention to number 5.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tilly176534

This sentence immediately caused me to remember my first Sinterklaas! :)

3 months ago
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