"Do you have time this afternoon?"

Translation:你今天下午有时间吗?

November 22, 2017

20 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaviFontal

Another alternative. 你今天下午有空嗎 Ni jintian xiawu you kong3 ma


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarAdal3

空 in this context is used to convey the meaning "to be empty", right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamawn

it means are you free


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicoleLove329

An expressionist one with the 嗎,哈哈!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xinmei20

你这个下午有没有时间?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carsenyoung

This is what I put too. Can anybody explain why this is not a correct option?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang

The problem is with *这个下午. While it is understandable what you mean, people just don't say it that way (it is permissible in some non-Mandarin local languages, but not in Standard Chinese or an other variant of Mandarin I have encountered so far). You say 今天下午 "today afternoon". And similarly for other days or times of day: 昨天晚上, 明天中午, 那天早上 etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maartendoc

时 (shí) = o'clock/time
间 (jiān) = between/among/room
时间 (shíjiān) = time/period


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RuciGluci

would 有空 sound more natural in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottSumne2

I find that 有空 is more natural, but 有时间 is a little more formal. Both are perfectly acceptable though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yuxqii._

you think that you are improving and then duo pulls the reverse card on you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenediktWi10

Why is 这个下午你有没有时间? wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevirish

你今天下午有时间吗?is their correct answer. Why is 今天下午你有时间吗?wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang

It isn’t. Someone probably just forgot to add it to the list of accepted answers. Please use the flag button to report he missing answer to the contributors next time the sentence comes up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jocke111

你 can also be omitted, but duolingo wont accept it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarAdal3

I think Chinese is the last language to be omitting the subject (after Japanese and Korean, which do this extensively).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephen_zissou

What do you mean by "last language"? Chinese omits the subject very often, not as much as Japanese, but much more often than English or German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/domsalazar0

Lol, the audio plays the English sentence instead of the Chinese one

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