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  5. "四点整我要到医院。"

"四点整我要到医院。"

Translation:I need to be at the hospital by four o'clock sharp.

November 22, 2017

87 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/codewritertom

"I need to be at the hospital at 4:00 sharp" is marked as wrong. Please add to your database.

With all the incomplete translations for this particular module, it is extremely difficult to get through.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

You can’t put ‘&’ for ‘and’ either. Just write things out properly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZhefeiLi

I find it funny that "o" and "'clock" are separate tiles. It seems unnecessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

Lots of point and click multiple choice language learning apps and sites separate every contraction this way. It does seem weird for "o'clock" but it's probably done automatically by the system.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patmando1

So because other people are idiots its okay for you also to be an idiot. You are needlessly making learning difficult. You can either keep them seperate, or stop claiming that learning a language using duolingo is fun and easy.

This is just a way to make it hard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankLobo22

There is a ' after o and before clock please not to forget.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patmando1

I like how they justify wasting our time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarunyuOng

The words at and by are totally different. At means only that time eg. At 4 pm. = 4 o'clock. But by means can be earlier or that time eg. by 4 pm. means can arrive before 4 or at 4 but couldn't be later than 4. Does it make sense to you all?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

Yes normally we'd use "sharp" only with "at". "Sharp" sounds a bit wrong with "by".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anita607591

Totally agree with you. "sharp" does not go with "by"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

No, ‘pm’ does not mean ‘o’clock’. What do you think ‘am’ means?

There is no hint of ‘by’ here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dcpetit

My answer matched the correct answer, and it said mine had a typo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karoliina765050

Same here :D I wrote 'By four o'clock sharp I need to be at the hospital' and it told me I had a typo, while it was just another CORRECT translation of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GwendalRop

Same problem here, I checked few times and I've got a screenshot :) exact same words than in the correction


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trilingualisaur

I am very confused as to when 要 is supposed to denote 'want' and 'need'. It seems to be at random that it is used for either. Surely one would say '我需要' to mean 'I need'??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aurore792496

Having lived and studied in China for a few years, this is also my understanding: 我需要 = I need. I am flagging this one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Popsukka

But isn't it right to use just one character to mean something, two characters of the same meaning just makes it clearer. That's how I've understood it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/den-kungen

要 in this context means will, not need.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carlosstef476961

I have a similar question, sometimes 要 is for need and other have, and for the context i thing have to go to the hospital, more than i need


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rcc0002

"At 4 o'clock sharp I need to be at the hospital" should also be accepted if "I need to be at the hospital by four o'clock sharp." is the correct translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielTyna

Do chinese speakera often use this character for "sharp" when talking about time? We rarely use it in english. 4 o'clock is 4 o'clock.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mnogomon

I did this lesson though once just to see what english answers I am supposed to give, and then again to pass it. Ridiculous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daoist-Papa

Ultimately I feel there is a clash here. In English, if you include 'sharp' you are indicating a precise time, 'by' indicates anytime prior and is therefore in contradiction with concept of 'sharp'. Please Duo, if you read these, choose one or the other, as both in the same sentence doesn't work in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waltcamp45

I "want" should b accepted here as well as I "have"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TS__

I said "must" instead of "need to" and it marked me wrong, come on duo this is getting ridiculous!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tra193390

I wrote "will" instead of need, still marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fj.isaac

I need to reach the hospital at 4 o'clock sharp?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

Is something wrong with "At 4 o'clock sharp I want to arrive at the hospital"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

That actually refers to the time that you want it, not the time you need to arrive. You would be understood but it is not good English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobinThor

But that might be exactly what the Chinese sentence is referring to in my understanding.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marin470782

The Duolingo robot has odd ideas about the use of 'sharp' in English time statements, to which it clings stubbornly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZoliVaczi

Why is o and 'clock separated?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sora942232

Where is 'by'? 'At' seems much better. what do you think?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonpeter

I wrote, "I need to be at the hospital at 4:00 o'clock sharp." I don't see the difference in sense between that and what you accept.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

It is just that your notation is non-standard. If you are using "o'clock" then showing the minutes is unnecessary, so it is not listed as a correct answer in Duo's database.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Handrisuselo

I NEED TO BE AT THE HOSPITAL BY FOUR O'CLOCK SHARP!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dejo

I wrote "By four o'clock sharp I must be at the hospital." It marked it wrong want wanted me to type " I " twice "By four o'clock sharp I I must be at the hospital."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mutimutimut

I don't think not using "the" should be considered wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samuel846762

What does sharp mean, Sorry I'm not an English native speaker


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

It means "exactly" or "precisely" when referring to times.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JudithMett2

Why is 'zai' for 'at' omitted here? There seems to be no rule as to when words such as these are used or not used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael331687

For the one question about the school with 要到 I used "be at".. Incorrect.. Now I us "go to".. Which is the correct it gave for the question I mentioned above... And..... Incorrect..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zaldrizes2

Can anyone tell me if there's a reason that 需要 isn't accepted? It's the only difference between the "correct" answer and mine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarionNand

I have just written the right answer three times it still says that it is wrong!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

It is better to copy and paste your answer. Others might see something that you have missed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaein694563

The meaning is still the same but they still say is weong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WIMDispa

What is the difference between "I have to be" and "I need to be" ?????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

None really. The latter is more common in the US I think but both are widely used in Australia and elsewhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YitLiC

It's so annoying everyone you miss a specific word that shouldn't matter if it's not in the sentence, you need a more diverse database, please!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John885280

Your hints say "I am at the hospital...", which you then mark wrong!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tsen107548

for four o'clock sharp... grumble


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thinkthing

Is it wrong to use "in" the hospital?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

It is just not how it is usually said when referring to the time you have to be somewhere. Being "in" hospital usually refers to you being a patient in a bed at the hospital so it is not commonly used if you just have to be there at that time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PBywater1

要 can be "want" as well, right? If the answer is "need" shouldn't it be 四点整我需要到医院


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkGrasel1

Translation options must be modified to: I need (or WANT) to be at the hospital by (or AT) four o'clock sharp

Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brndn_h

I feel you you should be able to say "for 4 o'clock sharp" as well as "by 4 o'clock sharp"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RositaStob

Stupid duolingo we are learning chinese not disputing about the English translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lois106894

I have to be was marked wrong. What is the difference between have to be and need to be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertHilt3

Surely "i will be at the hospital by four o'clock sharp" should be accepted. If it was need then it should be 需要.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuLee01

Why is the answer 'BY' 4:00...and not 'AT' 4:00? How do you determine that the timeframe relates specifically to 'BY' and not 'AT'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidCorba5

This section does have a number of problems. I can't see why "at 4 o'clock sharp i am to be at the hospital" isn't accepted. Maybe because I didn't put "I" in caps?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Popsukka

Isn't it enough to say "o'clock", why "sharp" as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allan870624

What is the difference between "four o'clock sharp" and "exactly four o'clock?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnKidd4

Please note that I cannot control the spacing when choosing the boxes containing 'o' and 'clock'... so it shouldn't be marked as incorrect spacing. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndersZhou1

I will go to the hospital at four o'clock sharp.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celticfiddleguy

Go = 去

Get to/ arrive = 到


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lily41907

FFS delete the idea of "sharp"!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lily41907

FFS delete the idea of "sharp"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicholasCh973033

I've to be is British English.... I will be should also suffice


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samchadw

Also, the original sentence in Chinese does not imply anything about "sharp". It just says "i need to be at the hospital at 4 o'clock"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celticfiddleguy

整 Zhěng = whole, complete, exactly, "sharp"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Natalie937439

"i need to be at the hospital FOR 4 oclock sharp" marked incorrect because it should be "BY 4 oclock sharp" - come on this is trivial.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike423180

Is this learning English or learning Chinese? How is "At 4pm sharp I want to arrive at the hospital" a wrong translation? The English grammar is right and the translation is just "need to be" vs "want to arrive", but its perfectly ok in English to say " I want to arrive somewhere by 4pm sharp..." and that's exactly how Chinese say it. SMH...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

Where on earth does the original sentence say ‘pm’?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanPatric908907

In English it should either "at 4 o'clock sharp" or "by 4 o'clock" but not "by 4 o'clock sharp" as required.

I do not know which of the correct English forms the Chinese text implies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dejo

If you are visiting a sick friend then you ''want'' to arrive; if you have an appointment with a doctor then you ''need'' to arrive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

Should also accept "I need to go to hospital at 4 o'clock sharp" I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jinjanodwan

去 = "go"; 到 = "arrive"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celticfiddleguy

Yes, this is because there are times when 到 is used to indicate "arriving" someplace to do something and we just don't say "I'll arrive at the airport to get you" but rather "I'll go to the airport to get you". However the stress is on "arriving/ being at" vs "moving toward/ going"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daoist-Papa

@ jinjanodwan: This works for me. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael331687

Yeah the last question with the same grammatical set up allowed "need to go"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phlezk

F.uck this bullsh!t

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