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  5. "Viele Kinder sind klein."

"Viele Kinder sind klein."

Translation:Many children are short.

November 22, 2017

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/archedmandible

What's wrong with, "Many children are small?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ly_Mar

I may be making a faulty assumption here, but from what I gather “small” said of a child indicates actual size or age, while “klein” said of a person only indicates stature.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

The word “klein” when used for people specifically means “short”.

The word “small” is for overall size, not just height and the word “little” is used for age or size.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VenomRobot

I WROTE THE SAME IT MARKED CORRECT (SORRY FOR CAPS)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nukamoi

Duo says "klein" is equivalent to "short", "small" or "little" but the answer "Many children are small" is not accepted here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Strange, now (March 20, 2018) I put "Many children are little." and that was not accepted but they gave me the correction as "Many children are small." So, it depends on context. If you said "my little brother" , that would mean "my younger brother" and the German word "klein" only refers to size, not age. They may not accept "little" from the German word "klein" for that reason. I have since found out that “klein” specifically means “short” when talking about people, but means “small” or “little” for things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosieLuna7

Duolingo accepted "small" as a translation of "klein".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VenomRobot

IT ACCEPTED FOR ME (SORRY FOR CAPS)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/evonhoene

So how would you say, "Many children are small?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chasjas

Duo did not accept "Lots of kids..." but only "A lot of kids...". Common English accepts both uses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Did you try to report it perhaps put My translation should be accepted?

Still, there are so many ways to say the same thing. I would just say “Many children...”. I think “a lot of” is usually used to replace “much” for quantities that we don’t count and “lots of”. Is used for quantities that we can count and this is one of those. Though ultimately people do use those two interchangeably.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan..G

This same thing just happened to me, I wrote "Lots of kids...". I have now reported that it should be correct, hopefully from now it will be.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucystarling

I came here to make this comment - I tried 'lots of children', but it said I needed to use the 'singular' form ('a lot of children'). I thought they were interchangeable in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbydud

In America it is ok to say that many kids are small it not wrong to say that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ly_Mar

It may not be “wrong” per se, but is it a good translation of the German sentence? ”Klein” when referring to a person indicates first and foremost height, hence why “short” is the suggested translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Yes, "small" refers to size, but "little" could refer to size or age and "short" refers to size only about height. A short child could be a short fat child or a short skinny child. A small child would not likely be fat. A big child could be tall or heavy. You would say a thin or skinny child, rather than a small child if he were tall but under weight. You could say "a small fat child", but it would be strange to say "a small skinny child" as it would seem redundant as small covers overall size. You could say it, but you would be emphasizing that the child is very skinny for a small child. The thing is "klein" does mean "small" and sometimes in English we say "little" to mean "small" and often in English we say "small" to mean "short". There is overlap. http://dictionary.reverso.net/german-english/klein

On the other hand, "short" only means "klein" when talking about people. http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-german/short http://dictionary.reverso.net/german-english/kurz

http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-german/little

Then there are expressions: "My little sister" would be "my younger sister." "My big brother" would be my older brother." Your little sister could be taller than you and your big brother could be shorter than you. There is no way to know from this expression.

"You are a big girl now." means that you have grown in size over time and are therefore older. You could say this to a child who is still rather small, but they are bigger than they were. This is often flattery used to get a child to act in a better way or to let them know you expect more from them.

http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-german/tall http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-german/big


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/finiteMonkeys

Both translations should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emmanuelle675133

Why cant Klein mean small?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meri938793

Klein means small too, but my answer is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JarnailSin922679

Why not use kurz for short?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick27986

I'm told I'm wrong when I use words that you are given if you tap for hints. This is very frustrating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

What did you put? The hints are for all sentences, so you must choose the definition that fits this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/splatoonboi

There are many different hints, you have to select the correct word from the hint, not just the first one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PamMcCarty

Can "klein" be used interchangeably with "kurz?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 208

No. Those words mean different things. "klein" means "small" (small in scale, opposite of "big"), whereas "kurz" means "short" (small in length, opposite of "long").

The problem arises, when you talk about the size of people. In English you usually say "tall" and "short", but in German you use "klein" and "groß" for that, which literally means "small" and "big". Things are treated differently in different languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/allan.alb

Why not "vielen"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 208

because you need a nominative here ("viele Kinder" is the subject), not a dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoscoeSnyd

Warum nicht "little"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Try reporting it, but keep in mind that “little” can mean “small” or “young”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/splatoonboi

In English it just sounds odd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philip881766

I gave the same answer as the correction. Others did too, see below No response from Duo. ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanniKistler

When I asked for the sentence to be spoken slower she practically yelled it. I only wanted it slower. Not louder!

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