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  5. "There are not many apples."

"There are not many apples."

Translation:사과가 별로 없습니다.

November 23, 2017

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maayan22866

What does 별로 mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntoniaLaR126475

Not many. From what I can tell you use 많이 있다 to say there are many and 별로 있다 to say there are not many.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldMath4

"Especially, in particular."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoesCathbert

사과는 별로 없어요? why is this wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

For clarity, 별로 and (level of formality) verb ending will be disregarded in the explanation.

있다 & 없다 ( = There is & There is not ) always require a real subject i.e. they need to be preceded by a noun marked by 이/가.

("There" in this kind of expression is called "apparent/ostensible subject")

'N'이/가 없다 = There is not any 'N'.

So:

There are not any/no apples = 사과가 없다 (single statement)

If then you wish to tag "apples" as a topic i.e.

Speaking of apples, there aren't any or There aren't any apples (but ...) = 사과가는 없다 (Open topic for possible discussion).

By omitting the subject marker, the sentence has no subject.

사과는 없다 = Speaking of apples, there isn't.

--> The sentence is incomplete. Hence, marked 'wrong'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldMath4

You have to choose between 가 and 는. You can't have both.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

cf. DLG example:

"서연이는 아름다운 반지를 매일 낍니다."

= Seoyeon wears the beautiful ring every day

Another way to use both subject marker and topic tag is:

사과는 사과가 없다.

It's a bit cumbersome but Korean does allow word repetition in a sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldMath4

I asked a fellow ALS 1954 student with a Korean wife about this. His reply follows:

Matt, I don't speak or understand Korean too well now, but I hear probably almost as much Korean spoken as English. A couple years ago I came across the same question you are asking. And consulted Hyoeun.

One of her brothers is named 은석. I have heard her utter sentences like the following countless times. 은석이는 어디있어요? When I asked about it, she said, 은석은 doesn't sound nice. But when a friend's name ends in a vowel she uses 은 after it. When I asked if she used the pattern for both speech and writing, she said "both". And after, a second, added, "I think it's the same for writing". I have heard MANY Koreans use this speech pattern. So I think your remark, " Sort of like the 'ny' of 'Johnny', is on point". ...

As for the sentence 사과가는 없다, she said, "That's not Korean. The 가 shouldn't be there."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldMath4

Bug in the evaluation program?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Calyope3

What is the difference using 별로 and 많이?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

많이 없다 = There isn't a lot/many ~ ( = there are some ~ )

많지 않다 = be not many ~ ( = be few ~)

별로 없다 = There are really none ~ = there are not exactly any ( = There is 'kinda' none / very few ). [별로 is a downtoner. It is usually used to soften the negativity of the sentence. ]

In usage, 많지 않다 = 별로 없다 but 별로 없다 is considered more colloquial (used a lot more in speech).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Annylost

Can i say 사과가 많이없습니다?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Korean_Dude

At least Snow White can't be poisoned!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldMath4

부사는어렵습니다!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nourx

Why can't we say " 별로 많이 없습니다 "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

별로 없다 = There are not really any => There are very few, if not none

별로 많이 없다 = There are not really a lot = There are not really many => There are only a few

The difference is similar to that of "few" (= near to nothing) and "a few" (= some but not a lot) in English.

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