1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Chinese
  4. >
  5. "这个字中文怎么说?"

"这个字中文怎么说?"

Translation:How do you say this character in Chinese?

November 23, 2017

85 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mecell

How do you say this Chinese character?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/codewritertom

That would be "中文字" - switching the order will give you the meaning you want. Crazy, i know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Imnuts7

汉字 is better, the simplified form of 漢字 (kanji in Japanese).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brillenschnecke

It is not only a kanji but the traditional 汉子 which is used till today on Taiwan, Macau and Hong Kong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brillenschnecke

I meant 汉字, sorry!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_STR3SS_

Same difference, if you really want to argue over semantics


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZingGot

Imagine you speak Japanese and recognise a character - you may (perhaps) have an idea of it's meaning, but wouldn't know how to pronounce it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

You recognize the character, know what it means (in Japanese - sometimes they're very different), And you can pronounce it in Japanese but not in Chinese. Happens to me all the time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JairoCaste19

Your bad influence misled me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

As we don't "speak" a letter in English, we also don't 说 a character in Chinese.

Correct:

这个字中文怎么 ? (best)

这个字中文怎样 ? (alternatively)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/codewritertom

the intended meaning here might be "say", not speak.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilyAlcee

You can say how do you say this letter..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy499355

Sounds off to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Imnuts7

Is that the traditional form of 念?I've never seen that character before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew-Lin

"唸" is a variant form of "念" when meaning "read out", not the matter of traditional form. By the way, in Taiwan both form are used, while the latter is getting more common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ladonnaeibhlin

Should it be "How do you pronounce this character in Chinese?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobinThor

no, this is for a translation of a word into chinese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celticfiddleguy

Actually it can mean either "how do you say this word (some other language) in Chinese" or "how is this character pronounced in Chinese"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobinThor

"how is this character pronounced in Chinese": What does this even mean? In Mandarin as opposed to Cantonese? Or Japanese? If you imagine a Chinese learner from e.g. English background, he would ask: "How is this character pronounced?", not "How is this character pronounced in Chinese?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PonyFreckles

Well, I'm a native English speaker who's learning Chinese, but can read more Japanese. I have a friend who is much the same. This is absolutely something we might say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZamiraBik

How to say this character in Chinese? - why this one isn't accepted? There isn't even 你 in the sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottSumne2

Its poor English grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Szh54

How do you say this (English) word in Chinese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celticfiddleguy

Yes, "字" can mean either a Chinese character or a word/term of any language. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/字


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

Just to make a remark here we don't refer to a word in Chinese itself as 字, unless it's just a single character.
e.g.
It is hard to say the word "sorry".
would translate to
对不起这 三个字 很难说出口。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celticfiddleguy

Yes, thank you Keith. "字" is a single Chinese character (or Japanese, Korean etc.) Or a word in any non-character based language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Szh54

*How do you say this (English) word in Chinese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

That would be: …中文怎么说? where you replace the … with the word you are asking about. If you want a direct translation of "How do you say this English word in Chinese?" (perhaps you are a Chinese speaker pointing to a long English word in a book, and you want your friend to translate it into Chinese for you,) you would say "这个(英文)词中文怎么说?” Note: "English" could be 英文 or 英语.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CalvinN4

"Say this character" is blindly translating. You say a word. More accurately you pronounce a word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

Characters and words are often not the same thing. (Character is 字. Word is 词.) There are many two--and even some three and four--character words in modern Chinese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy499355

In that case, it should be "How do you read this character?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kuyaC

Does 字中文 belong together? I first thought that it stands for "Chinese character" and should be written 中文字.
But now I see, maybe 中文说 means "...say in Chinese..."
Like

How do you say this character in Chinese?
这个字中文怎么说?

How do you say this character in Japanese?
这个字日语怎么说?

Can anyone confirm?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

I think you're totally right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Justin360988

Would it also be accurate to say "how do you pronounce this Chinese character?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

This sentence is asking about the Chinese pronunciation of a character, but it does not have to be a Chinese charcter per se. I believe the sentence could be asking about a digit, for instance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew-Lin

這個字中文怎麼說?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miles705

这个 字 中文 this Character Chinese

怎么 说 how say

How is this character said in chinese

Marked wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Darren565706

这个字中文 means this character in Chinese, not this chinese character.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

Either miles edited their comment or you misread it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jasdoge

Could someone explain the word ordering in this sentence? Why does 字 come before 中文?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

It's not 中文字 because you're asking about the Chinese reading of a character, as opposed to the Japanese or Korean reading. For example if you know 水 is read "mizu" or "sui" in Japanese but you want to know that it's pronounced "shui" in Chinese.

Imagine asking in French, how to pronounce this word ("grand" for example) in French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chibiito1

Does 字 mean a character or can it mean a word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linda437018

"How is this character said in Chinese?" – rejected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BradleySid2

It's kinda easy you guys


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/knoedelfri

Shouldn't it rather be "spell" or "pronounce" instead of "speak"? It sounds strange


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobinThor

这个字的中文怎么说 would be a more clear version of this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wbeeman

"How do you say this Chinese character" should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charlie285942

How do you say this in chinese should be acepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/msjanet38

I think it should be "这个中文字怎么说?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/max161409

I thought the translation would be spell not say


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy499355

It doesn't really make sense to talk about "spelling" a single character/letter. If anything, it would be "How do you write," but as you already know by now, it's read/say/pronounce.
And I still say it should be "read."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yuxqii._

Can't you say ''word'' instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexey_Amelin

This sentence DOES NOT INCLUDE 你 , which translate on english like "you"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottSumne2

It does not need to in Chinese. If the subject is obvious you can often omit it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexey_Amelin

This sentence DOES NOT INCLUDE 你, which translate on english like "you"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WIMDispa

I wrote: "How to say this character in Chinese?" It is marked as wrong. WHY???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnWillia27243

APA SIH YANG SALAH, KOREKSIANNYA GA ADA BEDA AMA JAWABAN GUA ANJER


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FJSoekahar

The correct answer should only be: "How do you say this chinese character" (when 字中文 translated to be Chinese Character). While :"How do you say this character in Chinese? Means how to say in chinese for any character be it English/latin character or Hindi character or Thai character etc. Any other opinion?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiriamMorr5

can it also be "how do you say this in chinese?" because when relating to the scentence you as a person would be pointing to the character and it doesnt need further destinction of it being one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexZhang815693

I think the English translation is a little off


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avertzy22

I know the answer! (这个字) zhegezi.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BradleySid2

Don't tell us the answer !!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CluelessGuy

the answer is actually wrong !!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JitendraKa742855

I don't understand this style of making sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guenter212784

I am not a native speaker of English, but I feel the literal translation "How do you say this character in Chinese" is impossible. You can read it (aloud) or you can pronounce it, but you cannot "say" it. Accordingly, Duolingo should accept alternative translations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hdDlD

"How do you say this Chinese character" has the same meaning, because you wouldn't ask for a pronouncing in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

Japanese also uses Chinese characters (and even refers to them as Chinese characters). So, asking how a character is pronounced IN CHINESE does matter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosanneNic

I feel that "How do you say this Chinese character(word)?" should be accepted, because it is asking how to pronounce it in Chinese, obviously. Why would someone want to say it in any other language? So, it essentially means the same thing as the official answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katiat

The same Chinese character is pronounced differently in different languages, like Japanese and Cantonese. So it's valid to ask how the character sounds in Mandarin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George792719

It seem it is not to duolingo' s liking to say:

"How do you say this Chinese character?"

Yet it is a fair interpretation of what is said in Chinese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniele329067

I think if you are asking someone how to say something in chinese its highly likely that the WORD is not in characters so a correct answer should also be "how do you say this in Chinese?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clwebb

Bid for 'How do you say this Chinese word?' from the floor, please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

Not the same meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rod37437

"How to say this word in Chinese?" is not a sentence in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wbeeman

How do you say this Chinese character should be accepted. In Chinese they are the equivalent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/e1VpVxkl

Accepted: Nov. 19, 2019


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sirdanilot

how do you say this chinese character should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelHe8

How do you say this chinese character? Should be correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wbeeman

"How do you say this Chinese character" is correct, but was marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/codewritertom

"How to say this character in Chinese? " 也应该对了, but marked as wrong here. "How do you say this character in Chinese?" = "这个字你 / 你们 中文怎么说 / 唸 / 读?" -- a little clunky, but still accurate.

Learn Chinese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.