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"你姓什么?"

Translation:What is your last name?

November 24, 2017

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blackkittypet

This is a little unrelated to this problem but I find that the words are easier to learn when I know what it means and sounds like before I start trying to learn sentences and match them. For example when you see a box in a character (ex. 吃 eat, 喝, drink) it'll sometimes mean it's related to your mouth (not always but most of the time 听 listen) or maybe I just learn better differently than others.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarpeGuitarrem

You're actually catching on to some of the "radicals" in the characters. The symbol 口 means "mouth"! Not all characters follow this meaning literally, but a lot do!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LLB1964

I'm seeing the same symbol (xìng [not 100% sure on the tone marking]) and sometimes it is translated surname, sometimes name. Here they wanted surname, but some places it seems to indicate simply "name."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oVoFeng

If it is only xìng姓, then the meaning is surname. If you see xìng míng 姓名together, the translation is name. Because 名 means given name


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bella520860

Thank you for clearing this up!! I feel like they do not explain things like this well enough sometimes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

What do you mean by "given name"? Never mind, I looked it up and it means "first name". I just never use that expression. To me, I thought that I was given both a first name and a last name, but in reality, I guess, you are born with a last name and are given the first name. I thought that my dad gave me his last name, but I guess in this expression that it was my last name and that he didn't have a choice. Now though in the new world, people sometimes have their mother's last name or a combination of the two last names.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grippygecko

Given name is a better description because in Chinese (and many other cultures) the family name is written or said first, followed by the personal or given name. E.G. Zhang Yi Mou is Mr Zhang.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nizzle1931

I believe 'xing' is in the fourth tone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Tip: in the Chinese sentence, the interrogative word is at the end, but if you translate in English, you have to put it at the beginning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmelamel

How to differentiate name and surname..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Surname is last name. If you ask "What is your name?" someone could give both first and last name, or last name, but as likely that person might just give a first name. I get it though, in English, we rarely specify unless they gave just a first name and now we want to know the last name too. In Chinese this is specifically the last name, so assume someone only gave you a first name, but you need to know the last name and this is what you would use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChloeTheLe3

Nihao Wo jiao Chloe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vengeful3

我高兴认识你。你好吗


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeToo573802

It would help, beginners like, when you translate in all the first lessons in the cards what the chinese sign is meanig


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catparrot

There are two "xing4" words that are very similar.
姓 xìng family name; surname; to be surnamed
性 xìng nature; character; property; quality; attribute; sexuality; sex; gender; suffix forming adjective from verb; suffix forming noun from adjective, corresponding to -ness or -ity; essence
https://yellowbridge.com/chinese/dictionary.php?searchMode=P&word=xing4&sortBy=f&pageno=1

xing4, etymological character formation of 姓:
woman + life ==> one's family name; clan, people
https://yellowbridge.com/chinese/character-etymology.php?zi=姓

xing4, etymological character formation of 性:
heart + life ==> nature, character, sex
https://yellowbridge.com/chinese/character-etymology.php?zi=性


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeannDicki

Can anyone explain why 'mingzi' is omitted here, but is required for 'Ni jiao shenme mingzi'?

(Also if anyone can point to an extension or something that will allow me to type characters, that would be awesome.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Scroll up to oVoFeng's answer to LLB1964 above, this means "last name" while your version asks about the " first name".
http://duolingo.wikia.com/wiki/Chinese http://duolingo.wikia.com/wiki/Guide_to_keyboard_layouts_and_input_methods


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

Go to your computer's control panel or phone's settings. There should be a language input section. It is often grouped with time zone and/or region. Choose Chinese as an input option!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grippygecko

This seems very rude. You should say 你贵姓什么. the extra character 贵 means "expensive, precious " and is used to mean "honourable " here. You add it for someone else's family name but not for your own. To not use it in the sentence here is impolite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jennyfer99432

I m just confused with xing and ming words plz someone help me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmadAbdul274414

i want to understand why it is written like this if any word is new to me how can i say it that is write i dont its meaning it i ok i want to know how can i say it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duolingoishardaf

How can you tell if its last name,name or surname


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Veronica274744

It is super dooper easy to learn chinese with this app which is DUOLINGO!!

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Natasha153186

I put what is your surname and it said it was unacceptable. Surname is the same as last name


[deactivated user]

    I swear sometimes this means last name and sometimes it just means name


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eugy423403

    Kienes son los inventores


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xiaoshe4

    this translation is very rude. it is much much better to say "您贵姓", althought it's a bit difficult for a learner. acturally, when starting a dialogue with someone not close to you, you'd better use 您 rather than 你. at least, it's important in Beijing.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaramLim

    how is that wrong

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