"Notre invité nous attend en bas."

Translation:Our guest is waiting for us downstairs.

March 15, 2013

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan_Ritchie

why suggest that 'en-bas' means down below, then mark me down for it. Stupid duolingo

February 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/gaysue

why not "down below"?

February 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AriaBrei

Would a female guest be ¨une invitée¨?

November 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

Yes, exactly.

November 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AllanH918

Perhaps (but alas, there is no context) they are on a boat-----down below!!

January 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tbdotl

Same problem, "down below" isn't allowed but is suggested as an option and was the only one that seemed to make sense. Very strange. Instead "below" is given as the correct answer.

February 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/michelinman

en bas could mean below

October 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

In the example: "en bas de la page", yes it means "below"

But when you are in a house, "en bas" translates to "downstairs"

October 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/eirlana

But the phrase doesn't say they are in a house. They could be in a garden at the top of a hill, for instance. Besides which, I know I've used the term 'below' to mean downstairs before. 'the guests are below' is definitely a term I would use. I wouldn't say 'below' is a wrong answer just because downstairs is more usual.

November 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

Agreed. In that perspective, the French could be "en-dessous".

November 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/coclark

Why not accept "below" as an answer since that can mean either downstairs or be specific to another context...

November 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/agentwigs

Is it only a Scottish thing to say 'He is waiting on us' as an alternative to 'waiting for us'?

February 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sel.kandar

No, we say that in the US as well.

March 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/beanie.m

But, at least in the US, and depending on context, "waiting on" someone can also mean attending to or serving them in some manner. "Do it yourself, I'm not going to wait on you." I imagine this is where the terms "waiter" and "waitress" come from.

September 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/prasadgupte

Notre sounded like net :(

December 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/the_maky

What is the difference between awating and waiting?

December 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

"to await" is directly transitive: our guest is awaiting us.

"to wait for" needs a preposition: our guest is waiting for us.

December 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/the_maky

thank you very much

December 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/jeffersonhowell

Just to be clear, in this context we are using "to wait for" correct? Does that make the preposition "en"? If "awaiting" was used, would you omit the en but the construction would otherwise remain the same? French prepositions man..... I dunno.

Side note: Is it "attend" and not "attendons" because the guest is the subject of the sentence?

January 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

"en bas" has no link with verbs "attendre/await", that are directly transitive, i.e. there is no need for a preposition, unlike "wait for", to introduce its object (nous/us):

  • our guests are awaiting us downstairs = our guests are waiting for us downstairs = nos invités nous attendent en bas.
January 9, 2015
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