"Co chceš udělat s těmihle línými zaměstnanci?"

Translation:What do you want to do with these lazy employees?

11/26/2017, 12:41:36 PM

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Tim984837
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Does one hear the executioner's axe being whetted in the perfective here? What do you want to do, once and for all, with these lazy employees?

10/17/2018, 2:40:07 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/JBHayven
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Does this mean "what do you want to achieve with these lazy employees" or "how will you deal with these lazy employees", or either?

11/26/2017, 12:41:36 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/endless_sleeper
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Both.

11/27/2017, 3:27:02 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Natashagra12

Why could you not say workers instead of employees? In Canada we use the two words interchangeably

10/21/2018, 8:05:01 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/VladaFu
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Isn't worker reserved for non-management level employees?

1/26/2019, 6:53:46 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Pedro_42
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I think I also had the same doubt when consulting https://slovnik.seznam.cz/en-cz/?q=worker : that definition (non-management level employee) seems to apply to the word "dělník" (the whole line reads "dělníci: (lower) workers, employees not in management"). Likewise, "pracující v určité oblasti" (working in a particular area) applies to "pracovník".

An alternative/complementary definition of "dělník" is "a person performing an occupation based on manual labor" (so I guess a good translation would be "manual worker/laborer")

As for "pracovník" and "zaměstnanec", I suppose they're probably interchangeable in most cases, but they're not exactly synonyms:

pracovník = a person performing a particular job as a profession

zaměstnanec = a person working for remuneration as instructed and on behalf of the employer with whom he / she is in a contractual relationship

For example, a self-employed person could be a "pracovník", but they wouldn't be a "zaměstnanec" (since they don't have an employer).

1/26/2019, 7:51:29 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/BoneheadBass
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I would say, yes, it is. i also think the use of "worker" may be environment-driven. I've worked mainly in professional services firms, where there are partners, managers/directors, and what are termed "employees" (salaried or non-salaried). Although their levels are different, managers and directors are also employees; only the partners are not. No one, at any level, was referred to as a "worker." I suspect it is different in other types of organizations.

1/27/2019, 8:47:10 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Pedro_42
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Probably because there is already a specific word for "worker". Compare:

work = práce

worker = pracovník (workers = pracovníků)

job = zaměstnání

employee = zaměstnanec (employees = zaměstnanců)

1/26/2019, 4:30:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Natashagra12

I never really thought about the distinction between a worker and an employee but I agree that worker would not be used to describe a manager. The term employee can be used to describe both.

1/28/2019, 4:55:58 AM
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