"Wir stehen auf."

Translation:We get up.

November 26, 2017

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PaulMcCann6

We are getting up. (Reported)

May 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Nithin.KA

Is this a separable word? aufstehen?

January 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

Exactly.

January 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/John804122

How do you say "We stand up?"

July 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

The same way: Wir stehen auf.

It could mean moving into a standing position after sitting on a chair or after lying in a bed.

July 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/BillWesley2

Why isn't: We are getting up - acceptable?

July 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

Because the Pearson editors, who last touched this sentence, did not include that translation.

See also https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/24066422 .

You can report your translation if you'd like.

July 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Fayever

is that we get up off the floor or out of bed?

November 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/biertopf

It can mean both.

November 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/montee2015

"We get up." "We are getting up." What's the difference? Why is the first accepted and not the second?

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulMcCann6

See mizinamo’s reply (directly above your question). “We are getting up” is fine, it has been reported (see my comment above from 3 months ago, for example), but it’s still not present in the database.

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Will709432

So just to double check, in German there's no present continuous? Ich stehe auf can mean both "I'm getting up" or "I get up" !

What about "gerade" in this sentence if we really wanted to make it clear we're doing this now - wir stehen gerade auf... ?

Also I've come across, in my attempts at reading German, beim being used for this. Can't remember examples but I think it was something like ich bin beim stehen auf. Not sure if that's correct though.

May 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

So just to double check, in German there's no present continuous?

Correct. (At least not in the standard language. Some regions or colloquial registers have various ways to express a continuous action, but those constructions are not accepted here.)

Ich stehe auf can mean both "I'm getting up" or "I get up" !

That's right.

  • Ich stehe gerade auf. "I am getting up right now."
  • Ich stehe jeden Morgen auf. "I get up every morning."

The verb is the same in German, though in English you would use a different verb form for an action taking place right now and a habitual or repeated action.

What about "gerade" in this sentence if we really wanted to make it clear we're doing this now - wir stehen gerade auf... ?

That would mean "right now".

If that phrase is present in English, you can translate it with gerade.

But you wouldn't put gerade into every German sentence where you would use present continuous in English.

For example: "What are you doing right now? -- I'm watching TV and eating pizza." Was machst du gerade? -- Ich sehe fern und esse Pizza.

You wouldn't say Ich sehe gerade fern und esse gerade Pizza any more than you would say "I'm watching TV right now and eating pizza right now" -- it's too "heavy".

Usually, context is just fine for determining that an action is taking place right now.

As such, gerade is generally not accepted on the Duolingo course unless it translates an explicit adverbial of time in the English sentence.

Also I've come across, in my attempts at reading German, of beim being used for this.

Yes. This is one of the various methods some speakers use, but it's not considered part of the standard language on this course.

Can't remember examples but I think it was something like ich bin beim stehen auf.

beim = bei dem, so it requires a noun after it -- the gerund (i.e. the infinitive, capitalised, treated as a neuter noun): beim Aufstehen.

Some say ich bin am Kochen, some say ich bin beim Kochen. With an object, it's even more interesting: ich bin Mittag am Kochen / ich bin am Mittagkochen, for example.

I'm sure there are a couple of other regional or colloquial possibilities as well.

May 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Will709432

Brilliant. Thanks for the comprehensive answer. Threw some lingots your way. :)

May 27, 2019
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